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Publication numberUS3103757 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 17, 1963
Filing dateMay 12, 1961
Priority dateNov 20, 1958
Also published asUS3138888
Publication numberUS 3103757 A, US 3103757A, US-A-3103757, US3103757 A, US3103757A
InventorsBrewer Margaret W
Original AssigneeSavage Arms Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bolt action rifle with ejector housing on magazine box
US 3103757 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 17, 1963 N. 1.. BREWER 3,103,757

BOLT ACTION RIFLE WITH EJECTOR HOUSING ON MAGAZINE BOX Original Filed Nov. 20. 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet l Ffig 1- III 2.1

INVENTOR NIC HOLA 5 L. BREWER DECEASED BY MARGARET W. BREWER EXLCUTRUK ATTORNEY Sept. 17, 1963 N. L BREWER 3,103,757

BOLT ACTION RIFLE WITH EJECTOR HOUSING 0N MAGAZINE BOX Original Filed NOV. 20, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR NKIHOLAS L. BREWER DECEA5ED BY MARGARET \N. BREWER EXECUTEIX ATTORNEY United States Patent Ofiice 3,103,757 Patented Sept. 17, 1963 3,193,757 BOLT ACTIGN RlFim WETH EJECTOR HOUSING (N MAGAZINE BOX Nicholas L. Brewer, deceased, late of Tarpon Springs, Fla., by Margaret W. Brewer, executrix, Tarpon Springs, I ia assignor, by mesne assignnments, to Savage Arms Corporation, Westiicld, lviass, a corporation of Delaware Original application Nov. 20, 1958, Ser. No. 775,143, now Patent No. 3,095,279, dated Oct. 24, 1961. Divided and this application May 12, 1961, Ser. No. 126,741 7 Ciaims. (CI. 4225) The present invention relates to improvements in small arms, such as rilles or the like, and in certain aspects finds particular utility in bolt action rifles.

This is a divisional application of applicants copending application Serial No. 775,l43, filed November 20, 1958, now Patent No. 3,005,279, and assigned to Savage Arms Corporation.

The principal object of this invention is to provide an improved magazine and ejector economical to manufacture and easy to replace and repair when necessary.

These and related objects of the invention including the novel features by which such ends are obtained will be apparent from the following description of the disclosure found in the accompanying drawings and the particular novelty thereof pointed out in the appended claims.

in the drawings:

PEG. 1 is a side elevation of a receiver and associated parts embodying the present invention with certain portions thereof broken away and with the action closed;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the elements seen in FIG. 1 with the action open;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary section taken on line IHIII of FIG. 1, with the bolt removed from the receiver and with the shells removed from the magazine;

FIG. 4 is an exploded perspective view, on an enlarged scale, of the magazine and ejector assembly seen in FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a partially exploded perspective view on an enlarged scale and with portions in section, of the bolt seen in PEG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a section taken on line VIVI in FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view on a different angle showing the front end of the bolt seen in FIG. 5 and illustrating its relation to the receiver which is shown partially in section and with its extractor in exploded relatron;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view, with certain parts removed, showing a different angle of the rear end of the bolt seen in FIG. 5;

FIG. 9 is a longitudinal section showing the front end of the bolt as it would be locked up in the breech preparatory to firing the illustrated cartridge;

FIG. 10 is a plan view of certain component parts seen in FIG. 5; and

FIG. 11 is a section taken on line XI-XI in FIG. 5.

The present invention includes certain aspects which are related to bolt action rifles as well as other novel features having broader utility in the field of small arms as will be apparent to those skilled in the art. FIGS. 1 and 2 illustrate the relationship of the various compo nents of a bolt action rifle embodying these inventive features.

Thus a rille stock is grooved to receive the lower portion of a receiver 22 and secured thereto by screws 24, 26 threaded into the receiver. The rifle barrel briefly indicated at 28 is threaded onto the forward end of the receiver with a lock nut 30 clamping a recoil plate 32 against the front face of the receiver 22. The recoil plate 32 may be received in a transverse slot formed in 2 the rifle stock 20 so that, if desired, the barrel 28 may be otherwise dissociated from the rifle stock to give a free floating barrel mounting yielding greater accuracy.

A bolt 34 is slidably and rotatably mounted in the receiver 22 and may be operated by a handle 36 to carry out the functions normally associated with bolt action rifles. Thus the handle 36 may be raised from the position seen in FIG. 1 to rotate the bolt 34, and cock the firing pin. It may then be retracted (FIG. 2) to withdraw an expended cartridge shell from the firing chamber to automatically eject the shell and then moved forwardly to feed a fresh cartridge from a magazine 38 into the chamber. When the handle 36 is again moved to its lower position, the bolt is locked in the breech of the rifle with the firing pin cocked in position to be released by the trigger 40. The above brief description is provided primarily to give an over-all picture of the rifle in which the present invention is embodied and the various components thereof, as well as its detailed mode of operation, will now be described in detail.

The belt 34 best seen in FIGS. 5 through 10, and particularly in H6. 5, comprises an elongated tubular body 42. The bolt handle 36 is provided with a hub 44 (FIGS. 5 and 8) having an inturned flange 45 which seats on the rear end of the tubular body 42. The hub 44 is slotted at 46 to receive diametrically opposed projections 48 extending from the rear end of the tubular body 42, thereby angularly positioning the handle 36 with respect to the tubular body 42. A screw 50 is threaded into the rear end of the tubular body 42 to secure the handle 36 in place. Ball detents 51 (FIG. 10) engage grooves 53 in the hub 44 (FlG. 8) to prevent loosening of the screw 58 when the rifle is in use and yet permit easy manual dissembly of the screw 50 without the need for special hand tools.

A bolt head 52 is disposed at the front end of the tubular body 42 and has a reduced diameter 54 (FIGS. 5 and 6) telescopically received within the front end of the tubular body 42. The bolt head 52 is angularly positioned by a projection 56 struck from the upper surface of the body 42 (FIG. 6) and received by a notch formed on the inner end of the reduced diameter 54. A locking pin or cross pin 58 secures the bolt head in place on the front end of the body 42. It will be seen that oppositely extending lock lugs 60 project from the fore portion of the bolt head 52. A front bathe 62 is rotatably mounted on the reduced diameter 54 between the front end of the body 42 and the lock lugs 60 and further has oppositely extending baffle lugs 64 projecting therefrom, the battle lugs 64 having the same general cross section as the lock lugs 60. it will also be noted that a spring friction washer 66 (FIG. 9) is disposed between the front baflle 62 and the bolt head 52 to urge the latter forwardly and thereby maintain the pin 58 in place and also to prevent the free relative rotation between the lugs 64 and the lugs 60, that is, the lugs 64 will be held from turning out of line with lugs 60 by themselves when outside the receiver.

The bolt 34 as thus far described, is slidingly received within a bore 68 (FIG. 3) extending lengthwise of the receiver 22, while horizontally disposed channels 70, opening outwardly of the bore 68, slidingly receive the lugs 64 and 66. The channels 70 terminate (FIG. 7) at the forwardmost position of the lock lugs 60 and the front end of the receiver is counterbored to form locking shoulders 72 (FIG. 7) which are angularly disposed to the channels 70. With this arrangement the bolt 34 is locked in the breech by moving the bolt to its forwardrnost position and then rotating the handle 36 from upper position to its lower position and thus bringing the lock lugs 60 into engagement with the shoulders 72,

thereby locking the bolt. It will also be noted that when the bolt is so rotated the baffle lugs 64 are captured in the channels 70 and their position relative to the receiver remains unchanged. This relationship of lugs 60 and 64 also involve the bafiling of gases as in the event of a ruptured cartridge, all as will be later dealt with in greater detail.

After firing a shell, the bolt handle is raised to return the locking lugs 60 into alignment with channels 70 preparatory to retracting the bolt and extracting the expended cartridge casing from the firing chamber. The relationship of the bolt head to the cartridge casing is best appreciated from FIG. 9 wherein it will be seen that the forward end face of the bolt head is counterbored at 73 to receive the grooved end of the cartridge case c. An extractor 74 is mounted on the forward end of the bolt head 52 and includes a lip or book 76 (see also FIG. 7) which engages the conventional groove formed in the grooved end of the casing c. More particularly, the extractor comprises a split spring band or clip having a relatively thin annular section 78 (FIG. 7) with grooved retaining lugs 80 at either extremity, the hook 76 extending :from one of the retaining lugs 80. The forward end of the bolt head is relieved at 81 (FIG. 7) to receive the annular extractor section 78 with grooves 82 (FIGS. 7 and 9') being provided to receive the rear portions of the retaining lugs 80, thereby positively positioning the extractor 74 relative to the bolt head 52 in an axial sense. This mounting arrangement further permits the spring band to be expanded as the retaining lugs 80 are snapped into notches 83 in the front face of the bolt head 52 with the lip or hook 76 projecting into the counterbore 73. The extractor 74 thus yieldingly hooks the rear end of a cartridge casing and is free to be deflected when the end of a cartridge case is inserted or ejected from the counterbore 73. It will be appreciate-d that the extractor is simple to manufacture, requires a very minimum of space and may be easily removed simply by springing one or the other of the retaining lugs 80 out of the notch or recess 83 formed in the end of the bolt head.

The extractor 74 thus relcasably grips the cartridge by the hook 76 and after firing, the bolt handle is rotated to its upper position preparatory to withdrawing and ejecting the casing. On firing the cartridge the casing will expand in the chamber and cam means are provided for positively camming the bolt rearwardly to initially free the casing from the chamber. These means comprise a member 84 rotatably and slidably mounted on the bolt body 42 between the bolt handle hub 44 and the rear end of the receiver 22 (FIGS. 1 and 8). Member 84 also serves as a rear gas bafile, as is later explained, and further includes a cam face 86 which is engaged by a projection 88 extending from the handle hub 44. In the last part of the upward movement of the bolt handle 36 the projection 88 engages the cam surface 86 and positively displaces the bolt 3-4 rearwardly thereby drawing with it the expended cartridge casing which is gripped by the lip or hook 76. It will be noted the extractor 74 is in the counterbore end of the barrel at this point and is thereby prevented from expanding as the casing is forcibly removed by this camming action. The bolt may then be fully retracted and the shell casing carried rearwardly to the ejector mechanism for automatically kicking the expended shell casing from the receiver.

Reverting back to member 84, it will be seen that it is somewhat greater than semi-circular in cross section with its lower ends resting upon shoulders 9|] (FIG. 1) formed adjacent the rear end of the receiver 22. The member 84 is normally maintained in a given angular relationship with the bolt body 42 by means of a spring pressed ball detent 92 (FIG. riding in a longitudinal groove 94 formed in the tubular body 42. This detent arrangement permits the bolt body to be rotated relative to the member 84 when the bolt handle 36 is moved to its lower position to lock the bolt in the breech of the rifle.

Referring next to FIG. 6, it will be seen that a tapered slot 96 is cut in the lower front end of the bolt head 52 and enters the bottom of the counterbore 73. Upon retraction of the bolt 34, the slot 96 is in aligned relation with a stamped sheet metal ejector 98 (FIGS. 1 and 3) which is spring urged upwardly. As the bolt nears full retraction, the ejector 98 enters slot or groove 96 and the rear end of the casing will forcibly strike the forward face of the ejector 98, thereby kicking the casing out through an ejection port or cut-away 10G intermediate the ends of the receiver. It will be noted that the lip 76 (FIG. 7) is generally aligned with the port 160 so that as the rear end of the casing strikes the ejector 93 it will be thrown laterally through the port 109 in a low arc.

The ejector 98 is disposed towards the rear of a bottom or lower opening 162 formed in the receiver 22 and is provided with an integral depending tail 194 which is guildingly received by a slot 166 formed in an ejector housing 198 (see also HG. 4). The upper end of the ejector 98 slidingiy engages the rear wall of a magazine box lit) and the rear wall of the receiver opening 102. A spring 112 is captured between the bottom wall of housing 108 and a projection 114 extending rearwardly of the extractor 98. This arrangement provides for vertical reciprocating movement of the ejector allowing it to move upwardly into the slot 96 of the bolt head 52 upon retraction of the bolt and to thereby eject the expended casing. The extractor is thereafter cammed down- Wardly as the bolt is again moved forwardly to feed another shell from magazine 38 into the firing chamber.

Referring now to the magazine 38 it will be seen that it comprises the magazine box 111} which is a sheet metal stamping bent into a rectangular configuration with the ends of the stamping meeting in abutting relation along a vertical line intermediate the width of the rear wall of the magazine box as is best seen in FIG. 4. A pair of tabs or lips 116 project outwardly from the rear wall of the magazine box and receive a downbent tab 118 extending from the ejector housing 138. The rear wall of the magazine box is also slotted at 120 to receive projections 122 extending from the walls of housing 103 to prevent the rear wall of the magazine 110 from spreading. It will also be noted that a lip 124 projects forwardly from the front wall of box lit) and lips 126 project rearwardly from the rear wall of the box. The lips 126 are spaced apart to permit passage of the ejector 98 therebetween and further guide said ejector. The lips 124, 126 are both spaced below the upper side edges 128 of said box, so that box 110 may preferably be mounted on receiver 22 by forming ledges 13!) (FIGS. 1 and 3) longitudinally of the bottom opening 1&2 and opposed horizontal slots 132, 134 spaced downwardly from the ledges 130 at the forward and rear ends of the opening 102. With this arrangement, the magazine box 119 may be assembled on the receiver 22 by inserting the lips 126 fully into the slot 134 engaging the upper box edges 128 with the ledges 130 and then shifting the box forwardly a distance suificient to introduce the tip 124 into the slot 132 and against the forward end of the receiver opening 102. The housing 108 with the ejector 98 and spring 112 assembled thereon is then inserted between the rear end of the box 110 and the forward end of the bottom opening 102 with the projections 122 entering the slots 120. Thus lips 124 and 126 are caught in the slots 132 and 134 respectively and cannot be removed without dismantling the housing 168.

It will be appreciated that while the combination mounting of the ejector 93, its housing 108 and the magazine box 110 have certain unique cooperative relationships, it would be possible to attain advantages by mounting either one or the other in the manner described, utilizing the necessary functions attributable to each and yet by either using some other form of ejector mechanism or using some other means for mounting the magazine box.

As can be seen from FIG. 1 the magazine box 110 is disposed within a central opening through the rifle stock 20. A base plate 131 covers over the bottom of this opening and is held in place by the screws 24, 26. A follower plate 133 is urged upwardly from the base plate 131 by a spring 135. This arrangement, as illustraded, permits cartridges to be loaded through the upper and lower ports 100 and 102 into the magazine 38 in staggered relationship. The follower plate 133 is provided with an olf-set projection 137 (FIG. 2) which insures that the cartridges will be caught on one side or the other of the bottom opening 102 (see FIG. 3) and not be fed loosely from the magazine 38. The cartridges project upwardly a sufficient distance so that upon full retraction of the bolt 34 the rear end of the uppermost cartridge is picked up for projection by the bolt 34 centrally from the magazine and then carried into the firing chamber as the bolt is moved forward. it will be seen that the inbent ridges 139 are formed on the side walls of the magazine box 110 to engage the forward shoulders of the cartridge casings to prevent shucking of the cartridges and consequent damage to the tips of the bullets.

The firing mechanism for the present invention is uniquely simple and comprises a firing pin 136 (FIG. 5) centrally disposed within the tubular bolt body 32 and projecting through a central bore of the bolt head 52. A firing pin stop nut or stop piece 138 is threaded on the forward end of the firing pin 136 and is engageable with the rear end of the reduced bolt head diameter 54 to limit the protrusion of the forward end or point 141 of the firing pin 136 beyond the counterbore 73. The point 141 of the firing pin 136 is best seen in its cocked position in FIG. 9, wherein it can also be seen that the bore in the outermost end of the bolt head closely approximates the diameter of the point of the firing pin to minimize the amount of gas which may be blown rearwardly through the bolt body 42. As has been noted, the stop piece 138 controls the extent of firing pin protrusion, this being established by threading the stop piece 138 to the appropriate axial position on the firing pin 136.

A lock washer 140 (FIG. 5) maintains the stop piece 138 in adjusted position. More particularly, the lock washer 140 is formed with a central opening having a straight edge which non-rotatably engages a fiat 142 formed lengthwise of the firing pin 136 and has spurs projecting outwardly and received in notches formed in the rear end of the stop piece 138.

A main spring 144 is coiled about an intermediate length of the firing pin 136 and is seated at its forward end on the lock Washer 140 and at its other end 0111 a washer 146 which is axially positioned on the firing pin 136 by a cocking piece 148 threaded on the rear end thereof to preload the spring 144, the washer 146 is also non-rotatably mounted on the firing pin 136 by reason of a central hole having a straight edge (FIG. 11) engaging the flat 142. A sleeve 150 slidably surrounds the cocking piece 148 (FIG. 5) and is provided with projections 152 (FIG. 11) at its forward end which interdigitate with spurs extending outwardly of the washer 146. The sleeve 150 (FIG. at its rear end butts against a shoulder formed on the assembly screw 50 and is rotatably mounted thereon by means of indentations as at 154 which engage a peripheral groove 156 formed in the forward end of the screw 50. The sleeve 150 is provided with a lengthwise slot 158 having a width somewhat less than the diameter of a transverse hole 160 formed adjacent the rear end of the cocking piece 148. A cocking pin 162 (FIG. 8) is disposed within the hole 160 (FIG. 5) and retained therein by the marginal edges of the sleeve slot 158 embracing a necked portion adjacent the head of the pin 162. The head of cocking pin 162 is disposed ad- 6 jacent the outer surface of the bolt body 42 passing through a cam opening 164 formed therein.

With this arrangement of parts, the firing pin may be cocked and fired in the following fashion. It will be seen that the head of the cocking pin 162, in the forward position of the bolt is disposed within the rear of receiver 22, entering into the near channel 70. A sear lever 166 projects upwardly into the near channel in obstructive relation to further forward movement of the cocking pin 162, and is integrally formed on a sear 169 to be later described in detail.

Normally the firing pin 141 is held in a retracted or cocked position by reason of spring 144 being compressed and held by the cocking pin resting in a notch 168 (FIG. 5) formed adjacent the rear end of the cam opening 164. In this position of the cocking pin 162 the cocking piece 148 and striker 136 are of course retracted while the spring 146 is compressed since the washer 146 is held relatively stationary by the sleeve 150. The above describes the relative disposition of the cocking pin 162 and related parts as the bolt 34 is moved forwardly to close the action of the rifle. After the action is closed, the bolt handle 36 is lowered to locked position as above described. In so lowering the handle 36, the bolt body 42 is rotated relative to the receiver 22 while the cocking pin remains relatively stationary being captured in the channel 70. The cocking pin 162 is thus held in cocked position at the rear of the greatest lengthwise extent of the opening 164 and the riflle is in readiness to be fired. Finger pressure on the trigger 40 will release the sear 169, in a manner later described, allowing the sear lever to swing downwardly out of the path of forward movement of the cooking pin 162 thereby permitting the firing pin to percussively strike the cartridge in the firing chamber under the influence of main spring 144. It will be noted that the cocking piece 148 is axially adjusted on the firing pin 136 to prevent cocking pin 162 from striking the forward end of the opening 165.

After the rifle has thus been fired the bolt handle 36 is raised to its upper position thereby rotating the tubular bolt body 42 relative to the cocking pin 162. During this rotation the angularly confined pin 162 is displaced rearwardly by cam surface 171 (FIG. 5) of the opening 164 thereby camming the cocking pin 162 and with it the firing pin 136 rearwardly and reseating the cocking pin 162 in the notch 168. Spring means return the sear lever 166 and the firing cycle just described may be repeated after retraction of the bolt 34 to eject an expended cartridge casing and return movement of the bolt to feed a fresh cartridge into the chamher.

What is claimed is:

In a rifle or the like, a receiver having a lengthwise bore for receiving a bolt, an ejection port opening upwardly of said bore intermediate the length of the receiver, and a bottom magazine opening, a magazine box secured to said receiver beneath said bottom opening for receiving cartridges which are to be fed upwardly through the bottom opening, an ejector housing detachably carried on the rear wall of said magazine box, a vertically disposed ejector mounted in said housing and guided thereby for vertical sliding movement and spring means for urging said ejector upwardly toward said bore.

2. In a rifle or the like, a receiver having a lengthwise bore for receiving a bolt, an ejection port opening upwardly of said bore intermediate the length of the receiver and a bottom magazine opening having an elongated generally rectangular outline, a magazine box for receiving cartridges which are to be fed upwardly through said bottom opening and comprising vertical side walls generally matching the outline of said bottom opening, said receiver having undercut means for the detachable mounting of the magazine box thereon, said magazine box having projections extending therefrom and engageable with said undercut means to secure the magazine box in fixed 7 relation to said receiver, an ejector housing mounted in part on the rear wall of said magazine box and interposed between said magazine box and the rear end of the bottom opening in such fashion that relative detaching movement between the magazine box and the receiver is prevented, a vertically disposed ejector mounted in said housing and guided thereby for vertical sliding movement and spring means for urging said ejector upwardly towards said bore.

3. In a rifle or the like, a receiver having a lengthwise bore for receiving a bolt, an ejection port opening upwardly of said bore intermediate the length of the receiver and a bottom magazine opening beneath said port and having an elongated generally rectangular outline, a magazine box for receiving cartridges which are to be fed upwardly through said bottom opening and comprising vertical side walls generally matching the outiine of said bottom opening, said receiver having opposed slots at opposite ends of said bottom opening and said magazine box having outwardly bent tabs projecting from the upper ends of its front and rear walls removably disposed in said slots to detachably mount the magazine box on said receiver, an ejector housing removably carried on the rear wall of said magazine box with its upper end interposed between said magazine box and the rear end of the bottom opening to prevent movement of the magazine box which would disengage said tabs from said slots.

4. In a rifle or the like, a receiver for receiving a bolt an ejection port opening upwardly of said bore intermediate the length of the receiver and a bottom magazine opening beneath said port and having an elongated generally rectangular outline, a magazine box for receiving cartridges which are to be fed upwardly through said bottom opening and comprising vertical side walls generally matching the outline of said bottom opening, said receiver having opposed slots at opposite ends of said bottom opening and ledges formed lengthwise f the marginal side edges of said bottom opening, said ledges being spaced above said slots, said magazine box having outwardly bent tabs projecting from the upper ends of its front and rear walls, said tabs being spaced beneath the upper edges of its side walls, said rear tab being projectable into said rear slot and the upper edges of said side walls being engageable with said ledges, said magazine box being shiftable to introduce the front tab into said front slot, a sheet metal ejector housing having its upper end interposed in latching fashion between the rear end of said bottom opening and the rear wall of said magazine box to prevent disengagement of said tabs from said slots, said magazine box having an outwardly projecting lip adjacent the lower end of its rear wall and said housing having a downwardly bent portion received by said lip to retain the housing in latching relation on said box, said housing further comprising a slotted bottom wall, an ejector having a tail extending through the slot in said bottom wall, the rear tab of said box having a slot for receiving the upper end of said ejector whereby the ejector is guided for vertical sliding movement, said ejector further having a projection intermediate its length and a spring confined be- 8 tween said projection and the bottom housing wall for urging said ejector upwardly.

5. In a rifle as in claim 4 wherein the magazine box is bent into rectangular shape from a single piece of sheet metal with the ends of said sheet metal abutting along a vertical line intermediate the length of said rear wall and wherein the rear wall is provided with slots on each side of said vertical line and further wherein the ejector housing has forwardly extending projections entering the slots in the rear wall of said magazine box to prevent spreading of the rear Wall of said receiver.

6. In a rifle or the like, a receiver for receiving a bolt, an ejection port opening upwardly of said bore intermediate the length of the receiver and a bottom magazine opening beneath said port and having an elongated generally rectangular outline, a magazine box for receiving cartridges which are to be fed upwardly through said bottom opening and comprising vertical side walls generally matching the outline of said bottom opening, said receiver having opposed slots at opposite ends of said bottom opening and ledges formed lengthwise of the marginal side edges of said bottom opening, said ledges being spaced above said slots, said magazine box having outwardly bent tabs projecting from the upper ends of its front and rear walls, said tabs being spaced beneath the upper edges of its side walls, said rear tab being projectable into said rear slot and the upper edges of said side walls being engageable with said ledges, said magazine box being shiftable to introduce the front tab into said front slot, and an ejector housing interposed between the rear end of said bottom opening and the rear wall of said magazine box to prevent disengagement of said tabs from said slots, said magazine box having an outwardly projecting lip adjacent the lower end of its rear wall and said ejector housing having a downwardly bent portion received by said lip to retain said housing in latching relation on said box.

7. In a rifie as in claim 6 wherein the magazine box is bent into rectangular shape from a single piece of sheet metal with the ends of said sheet metal abutting along a vertical line intermediate the length of said rear wall and wherein the rear wall is provided with slots on each side of said vertical line and further wherein the ejector housing has forwardly extending projections entering the slots provided on each side of said vertical line to prevent spreading of the rear wall of said receiver.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 853,715 Mondragon May 14, 1907 1,172,069 Stamm Feb. 15, 1916 1,260,991 Hammond Mar. 26, 1918 1,306,972 Nelson June 17, 1919 2,275,213 Wise Mar. 3, 1942 2,875,544 Krieger Mar. 3, 1959 FOREIGN PATENTS 405,749 Italy Sept. 6, 1943 411,001 Great Britain May 31, 1934

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US853715 *Aug 8, 1904May 14, 1907Manuel MondragonFirearm.
US1172069 *Oct 27, 1914Feb 15, 1916The Fibm Of AdolphHans stamm
US1260991 *Nov 1, 1915Mar 26, 1918Dalton Arms CorpMagazine for firearms.
US1306972 *Aug 22, 1916Jun 17, 1919 Cartridge-magazine for firearms
US2275213 *Sep 5, 1940Mar 3, 1942Wise Charles RRifle magazine
US2875544 *Jan 3, 1955Mar 3, 1959Krieger Robert RFirearm cartridge magazine
GB411001A * Title not available
IT405749B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5926988 *Jan 21, 1998Jul 27, 1999Casull; Richard J.Mechanical tight cartridge casing release for a rifle bolt
DE1291267B *Oct 30, 1963Mar 20, 1969Heckler & Koch GmbhAuswechselbares Magazin fuer eine Feuerwaffe
Classifications
U.S. Classification42/25, 42/18, 42/50
International ClassificationF41A3/00, F41A19/00, F41A15/16, F41A17/52, F41A17/32, F41A13/00, F41A3/22, F41A19/16, F41A15/12, F41A17/00, F41A15/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41A17/32, F41A15/12, F41A15/16, F41A13/00, F41A19/16, F41A3/22, F41A17/52
European ClassificationF41A15/12, F41A15/16, F41A19/16, F41A17/52, F41A3/22, F41A13/00, F41A17/32
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 9, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: SAVAGE INDUSTRIES, INC., SPRINGDALE RD., WESTFIELD
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:EMHARDT INDUSTRIES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:003938/0104
Effective date: 19810923