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Publication numberUS3103762 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 17, 1963
Filing dateOct 17, 1960
Priority dateOct 17, 1960
Publication numberUS 3103762 A, US 3103762A, US-A-3103762, US3103762 A, US3103762A
InventorsGlass Marvin I, Leonid Kripak
Original AssigneeGlass
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Remotely controlled electric toy
US 3103762 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 17, 1963 M- l- GLASS EI'AL REMOTELY CONTROLLED ELECTRIC TOY Filed Oct. 17, 1960 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 I39 Z95 fnverzzur's 3 Marvin lGlass Leonid Kripak 2 Sept. 17, 1963 M. 1. GLASS ETAL REMOTELY CONTROLLED ELECTRIC my 4 Sheets- Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 17, 1960 JJZVEHZDPE Marvin I.Glass Leonid Kripak W A Se t. 17, 1963 M. 1. GLASS ETAL REMOTELY CONTROLLED ELECTRIC TOY 4 Sheets-Shet 3 Filed own; 17. 1960 5 mm mm v.m

Leonid Kripak REMOTELY CONTROLLED ELECTRIC TOY Filed Oct. 1'7, 1960 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 l I l fzzvEztzzaz'" f5 Marvin LGlass Leonid Kripak --I4 I United States Patent 3,103,762 REMOTELY CONTROLLED ELECTRIC TOY Marvin I. Glass, Chicago, and Leonid Kripak, Villa Park,

a Ill.; said Kripak assignor to said Glass Filed Oct. 17, 1960, Ser. No. 63,007 17 Claims. (Cl. 46-232) This invention relates generally to toys which are remote controlled. The invention also relates to selfpropelled toys. More particularly, the invention relates to self-propelled toys which are controllable from a 3,103,762 Patented Sept. 17, 1963 III fragmentary view illustrating engagement of the rocket in firing position on the firing device;

FIGURE 12 is an enlarged side view, partially broken away and sectioned, one of the arms of the robot;

FIGURE 13 is an exploded, diagrammatic perspective viewof a portion of the mechanism for rotating the arms of the robot; and

remote point and which incorporate one or more fascinating and/or realistic, attention attracting, operational features, such as special auditory and visual effects, variably controllable multi-directional travel, and missile firing features. Still more particularly, the invention relates to toys which are intended to simulate, both in appearance and activity, armechanical creature or robot.

In this ever-advancing age of science everyone, including children, is subject to ever increasing exposure, by

ing eyeballs.

'" incident to a vocal command from the player and are virtue of newspapers, magazines, and television, to the concept of automated activities by mechanisms and devices which are remotely controlled and which may perform certain actions suggestive of human endcavorz. As a result, youngsters are becoming more and more interested in, and attracted toward, mechanical creatures. Accordcarried by a tricycle support including two independently V ingly, the general object of the invention is the provision of a toy which is suggestive of a mechanical creature or robot and which, when coupled with the fari reaching imagination of a child, will provide many long hours of play.

More specific objects of the invention include the provision of a self-propelled toy which includes mechanism operable to drive the toy over any selected path or track, which includes one or more missile firing mechanisms, with or Without related means for producing an associated realistic sound effect, and/or which is remotely controllable, at least in part, by sound command.

Other objects of the invention include the provision of various operating components and devices which, in this disclosure, are described in functional and structural combination in a robot toy.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent by reference to the following description and the accompanying drawings of one embodiment of the invention in which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a toy which resembles a robot and which embodies various of the features of the invention; 7

FIGURE 2 is an elevational view, partially in section,

showing the general layout of the interior mechanism within the robot;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged, partial plan view of a portion of the operating mechanism of the robot;

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary side view of a portion 0 the operating mechanism within the robot; 7

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary view taken generallyalong line 55 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE dis a fragmentary view taken generally along line 6-6 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 7 is a perspective view of the slide by means of which various of the operating components are connectable to the motor;

FIGURE 8 is a plan view, partially broken away, of the remote unit for controlling the robot;

FIGURE 9 is a sectional view taken generally along line 9-9 of FIGURE 8;

FIGURE 10 is an enlarged fragmentary view, partially broken away and sectioned, showing the rocket firing deviceincorporated in the robot;

FIGURE 11 is a partially broken away and sectioned,

a bifurcated slide 79 which is guided for linear movement driven by a self-contained-power source.

In appearance, the toy takes the form of a mechanical robot 17 which is controlled by a remote unit 19 (see FIGURES 8 and 9') and which includes a main body 21 movable forwardly located drive wheels 23 and 25 and a rearwardly located caster wheel 27 (see FIGURE 2). The main body 21 can be fabricated in various ways and, in the disclosed construction, two mating plastic sections are utilized. At the top of the main body 21 is a head 29 which includes the before-mentioned rotating eyeballs 31 and 33. Rotatably carried at the shoulders of the robot main body are a pair of arms 35* .and 37. In the disclosed embodiment, the projectile discharging features include a rocket firing device 39 located in the head 29 (see FIGURES 2, 10, and 11), and a ball throwing mechanism 41 associated with each of the arms 35 and 37 (see FIGURES 12, 13, and 14).

Secured within the main body 21 is a frame 43- (see FIGURE 2) which includes a main platform 45, together with a pair of transversely spaced upright posts 47 and 49'(see FIGURES 2 and 4) and a cross beam 51 (see FIGURES 2, 4, and 13) connecting the upper ends of the posts 47 and 49.

As seenespecially in FIGURE 3, there is mounted to the platform v45 a pair of upright plates 53 and 54 which constitute a sub-frame supporting a small direct current electric motor 55, and a speed reducing gear train 57, as well as various components which can be selectively connected to the gear train 57 to cause the various action operations. In the disclosed construction, the motor 55 is electrically connected to and powered by a series of batteries 59 mounted in a battery pack 61 (see FIGURE 2) which is snap fitted into the back of the main body 21. However, another source of energy could be used as well as an alternating current type motor. In addition, a spring wound motor with a suitable r-eleasemechanism could also be employed.

The speed reducing gear train 57, through which the various operating components are powered, is driven, as seen in FIGURE 3, by a pinion 61 on the output shaft of the motor 55 and includes, in part, a series of intermeshed first, second, third, and fourth gear and pinion assemblies '63, 65, 67, and 69 which are respectively carried on cross shafts 71, 73, 75, and 77 journalled in the side plates 53 and 54.

Suitable means are provided for selective connection of the various operating components to the gear train 57. In the disclosed construction, this means takes the form of by the lower margins of the side plates 53 and 54 and by suitable lugs (not shown) projecting from the side plates. Movement of the slide 79 is controlled, as will be later described, by the remote unit 19.

The slide 79, as seen best in FIGURE 7, incorporates a series of cam surfaces 31, 83, and 85 which are arranged to selectively connect either or both of the drive wheels 23 and 25 to the motor 55 to causemovement of the robot I V eitherj'ahead, or to the left,.or to the right. ,Also included on the slideare cams 87 and 89 which are respectively operable to actuate the rocket firing. device 39 located in the, head 29 of the robot and to cause rotation of the arms 35 and; 37 so asto effect throwing ofobjec'ts from the robot.

Considering themechanism bywhich travel of the robot is controlled, each of the drive wheels 23 and 25 is depending leg 114 of a pivotally mounted, inverted Y lever 1 15 so as to rotate the Y leverin the counterclockrelease of a rocket 117 (see especially FIGURE 11) in the head of the robot. The Y lever 115 is pivotally carried on thefourth cross shaft 77 .andincludes', on its j stem 119, a pinion 121 which is located so as to be con- I tinually -in meshwith a gear 123 fixed exterior of the independently connectable to the gear train 59 by separate, but generally identical means or arrangements. Ac-

cordingly, onlythe arrangement for driving the drive wheel 23 will be disclosed, it being understood that the other drive arrangement is constructed and operates in a similar manner. Specifically, as shown in FIGURES 3 and 6, the Wheel 23 is rotatably mounted on a shaft 91 extending through the lower forward part of the main 1 I body 21 and includes, adjacent the main body, a portion 93 of reduced diameter which takes the form of. a gear.

Connecta-ble between the gear portion 93 "of the wheel and a gear '95 connected exterior of the side-plate 54 ona cross shaft'9-7 extending between the side plates 53 and 54, is a pinion 99 mounted for rotation on a pivot lever 101. The lever 101 is pivoted about the cross shaft 97 and the pinion 99 is 'rotatably mounted on the lever so as into andout of meshing engagement with the gear porto be retained in mesh with the gear 95 and so as to move 7 tion 93 of the drive wheel 23 incident to pivoting o-fthe lever 101. In turn, the cross shaft 97 also carries a gear 103in-mesh with the fourth gear and pinion assembly 69'. 'Depen-ding' from the lever 101 is anarm 105 having a wedge 107 at its lower end which, as the pinion 9*9 moves out of meshingengagement with the gear portion 93 of the drive wheel 23 incident to clockwise pivoting of the wise direction, as seen in FIGURE 5, thereby effecting plate 53 on-the fourth cross shaft 77, and so as to be movable, incident to pivoting of the Y lever 115, into and I out of engagement with a drive gear: 1125 rotatably mounted on a stud '127 projecting from theplate 53L V The Y lever115 is nornrallybiascd by suitablen eans so that the pinion121 is in a neutral or disengaged posi-'- tion relative, to the drive gear 125,. In the'disclosed construction, this biasing means takes the form of a double ended leaf spring 129 which .is suitably mounted, 'as' shown, on the plate 53 so thatits opposed lends engage pins 131 and 133 respectively anchored in thepreviously mentioned depending leg 114andin the other depending leg 135.,

The drive gear 125 operates, when connected to'the gear train 57, toreciprocate a throw r'od137 (see FIG- URES 2 5, and 10) so as-to performthe dual function of opening a door 139 (see FIGURES 1 and 2). in the head 29 of the robot and of releasing the rocket 1'17 carried lower end to a stud 141 on the drive gear 125 and is lever 101, as seen in FIGURE 6, engages Within one of suitable means which, in the disclosed construction, takes I the form of a leaf spring 109' engagingthe rearward end of the lever 101 so as to urge the pinion 99 into meshing engagement with the gear portion 93 of the drive wheel 23; However, the leverl101 is generally restrained from such movement by 'engagementof an ear 111 which projects from the rearward end of the lever 101 for en- 7 the tooth spaces on the gear portion '93 to lock the drive wheel 23 against rotation. As seen in FIGURE 6, the

lever 101 is biased in the counterclockwise direction by head of the robot.

gagement with a ledge;1'13 (seeFIGURE 7) extending along the side of the slide 79. I .As can be seen best in FIGURE 7, the beforcsmentioned carnming surfaces 81, 83, and 85 constitute upwardly inclined notchesxin the ledges 113 which permit swinging of the levers 101 under the influence of the leaf springs 109 so as to serve the dual function of unlocking the drive wheels 23 and 25 for rotation and of engaging the pinion-s 99 with the drive wheels so as to cause their rotation in the rotated while the left wheel 23 is locked againstrotation,

thereby pivfotingthe robot to the left. In this connection,

' by a tongue 147 which'is interfitted in a mating not-ch or it will be observed, that the rearward portion of the cam-: ming surface '81 is located directly across from camming,

ously connected tothe gear train 571.

' Cont' ued forward positioning of the slide 79 relative to'the turn left position operates to cause release of the rocket firing device 39 contained in the head 29 of the robot. More particularly, as seen best in FIGURE 5, the cam 87 on the slide 79 is positionable under one surface 83 so that both drive wheels canbe simultanein launching position by the firing device 39; More particul-arly, the throw rod 137 is pivotally connected at its guided adjacent its upper end by a post or pin 143 ,(see FIGURE 10) anchored in a block 145 (see FIGURES 2 and 10) supporting the, rocket firing device 39. The post 143 is positioned tolocate the top ofthe throw rod 137 so that, incident to upward movement of the throw rod,

the undersurface of the door 139 is engaged and swung" upwardl'y'to its open. position to permit travel of the rocket outwardly of the robot head incidentto release of the rocket.

Preferably, the door '139 is fabricated of transparent material so that the rocket 117 can be seen within the The rocket firing device 39 is adapted to discharge the V rocket 117 and to cause operation of a noise making means 146 (see FIGURE 10), which means, inthe dis-' closed construction, produces a noise effect resembling a siren sound. More particularly, the rocket firing device is supported on the before-mentioned block 145. which is mounted, in part, on the cross beam 51 extend-- ing between the upright posts 47 and 49, and,.in part,

groove in a projection 149 .on the inside of the robot head 29. Extending within the block 145, as seen best in FIGURE 10, in an upwardly inclined disposition, is a channel or guidcway 151 which receives a plunger 153 for axial movement therein.

The plunger 153 includes a lower portion 155 of noncircular cross section which prevents --rotation of the.

plunger in the, block and which also serves to limit upward movement of the plunger outwardly of the block by engagement with a shoulder 157 (see FIGURE 11) within the guideway adjacent the top face of the block. In-

cluded on. the lower plunger-portion 155 is a rack 159 I whichis engageable with a pinion 161 mounted on a cross.

arbor 163 journalled in the block. The pinion161 forms a part of the siren sound noisernaker, still to be described.-

At its upper or outcrzend the plunger 153- takes the form of a cylindrical rod 165 whichis'of smaller diam-f cter than one dimension of the ,lowerportion 155 and which passes through .a rocket-aligning hub 167 projecting from the top face of the block. At its entremcupper end,

" there is suitably attached, as by the illustrated screw 169,

a stop in the form of a washer 17,1 whichis of larger outside diameter than the rod. The washer 171 functions In this'connection, the door is suitably hinged along its rearward, edge to the robot head .29:

to retain on the rod 165 aflanged collar 173 which is otherwise axially slidable upon the rod between the washer 171 and the block 145.. Surrounding the rod 165, between the collar 173 and the bottom of a well 175 in the rocket-aligning hub 167, is a helical power spring 177.

Located for pivotal movement across the top face of the block 145 is a latch member 179 which is suit-ably biased by a spring 181 for movement toward a position locking the rocket 117 against release. The latch member 179 includes an ear 183 which is engaged by a bent portion 185 of the throw rod 137 to cause movement of the latch member 179 away from its rocket engaging position incident to the terminal portion of the upward movement of the throw rod, which movement also completes opening of the door 139 at the head of the robot to permit passage of the released rocket. I

t The rocket 117 is particularly designed for cooperation with the latch member .17 9 to retain the rocket in position ready for release, and with the plunger 153-c0llar 17 3- power spring 177 arrangement so as to facilitate spring powered launching of the rocket, as well as delayed operation of the siren noisemaker '146. As seen in FIGURE 11, the rocket 117 comprises a hollow elongated, generally cylindrical body having a rounded nose and an open base. The base is proportioned for a sliding fit on the rocket aligning hub 167 and includes a flange 187 engageable by the latch member 179 to retain the rocket on the hub against the force of the power spring 177. Approximately rhid-way of the rocket there is provided a shoulder 189 which forms a bore permitting passage of the rod 165 and Washer 171, but which limits travel of the collar 173. Located outwardly of the shoulder '189 within the rocket is a wall or stop 193 which is engaged by the outer tip of the plunger rod 165 incident to loading of the rocket on the plunger .153.

-As can be seen from FIGURE 11, when the rocket 117 is loaded on theplunger 153, the collar 173 is first en gaged by the shoulder '189 to compress the power spring 177 as the collar '173 slides inwardly along the rod 165. When the spring 177 reaches a partially compressed condition, the outer tip of the rod engages the wall 193, which engagement causes inward travel of the plunger 153 relative tov the block .145. At the same time, the power spring 177 is further compressed by continued engagement of the shou1der189 with the collar 173. Inward movement of the plunger 153 engages the rack 159 with the pinion 161. Whenthe rocket 117 is seated on the aligning hub 167 in position for engagement by the latch member 179 to prevent unwanted discharge of the rocket, the power spring 177, as seen best in FIGURE '11, is essentially fully compressed.

When the throw rod 137 is moved upwardly by the drive gear 125, the latch member '179 is swung from its position of retaining engagement with the flange 187 of the rocket 11 7. The power spring 177 then acts through the collar 173 against the shoulder 189 to launch the rocket from the plunger. As the power spring 17 7 expands, the collar 173 travels outwardly of the plunger rod 165 until it cont-acts the washer 171, after which the power spring '177 also rapidly drives the plunger 153 outwardly of the block 145. This movement of the plunger 153 causes rotation of the pinion 161 and consequent operation of the siren noisemaker 146 at a time subsequent to launching of the rocket 117 from the head of the robot.

The siren noisemaker 146 incorporates, in addition to the pinion 161, a sounding box or chamber '195 including a diaphragm 197 of shim stock, fish paper, or other suitable material. Secured generally centrally of the diaphragm .197 is a vibrator or reed 199 which extends for engagement of its free end with the teeth of the pinion 161. The arbor 163 carrying the pinion 161 preferably also supports a fly wheel (not shown) so that rotation of the pinion will be sustained for a relatively prolonged time interval after disengagement of the rack 159 from the pinion 1161 incident to the terminal portion of the outward plunger travel. Thus, sustained rotation of the pinion 161 causes continued vibratory action of the vibrator 199 with a consequent siren noise effect being produced.

Returning" now to the slide 79 and its selective movement relative to the plates 53 and 54, as the slide is moved forwardly of its rocket releasing position, the cam 87 perrmits return of the Y lever to its central or neutral position in which, as seen in FIGURE 5, the drive gear is disengaged from the pinion 121'. Further'forward movement of the slide 79 is effective to actuate the ball throwing arms 35 and 37 of the robot by engagement of the cam 89 with the end of the depending leg of the Y lever 115 so as to rock the Y lever clockwise,-as seen in FIGURE 5, from its central or neutral position. This movement effects engagement of the pinion 121 with a gear 251 rot-atably carried on a stud 203 fixed to the plate 53. In turn, the gear 201 engages an idler gear 205 carried by a second stud 207 fixed to the plate 53. Fixed to the idler gear 255 is a sprocket 209 which is connected through an endless chain 211 to a second sprocket 213 (see FIGURE 4) fixed on a cross shaft 215 which extends through and is journalled by the upright posts 47 and 49. Engagement of the pinion 121 with the gear 201 causes the cross shaft 215 to rotate in the clockwise direction, as seen in FIGURE 4. Carried for free rotation at the ends of the cross shaft 215, exteriorly of the main body 21, are the arms 35 and 37. The arms are secured on the cross shaft 215 by suitable means, such as a threaded nut which may take a decorative form such as indicated at 216 in FIGURES 12 and 13.

Each of the arms 35 and 37v of the robot is generally identicaLbothin construction and operation, except-for being left and right handed. Accordingly, only the arm 35 will be described. The arm 35 is generally a hollow element or body including a main part 217 providing, at least in part, a magazine for containing a plurality of balls 219, which balls are preferably of light weight, such as ping pong balls, only smaller in size. The top of the nain part 217 is closed by a cover 221 which, in the disclosed construction, is suggestive of an epaulet and is hinged, as indicated at 220, to the main part 217. Suitable means are provided for retaining the cover closed, such as a spring or the illustrated clip 222. At the lower end of the arm 35, there is provided a cup or receptacle 223 which is rearwardly open when the arm is downwardly hanging from the cross shaft 215. Connecting the cup 223 and the main part 217 is an intermediate part 225 which carries at least a part of a device 227 for feeding balls 219 one at a time to the cup 223.

The balls 219 are thrown from the cups 223 by intermittent rapid rotation of the arms, one ball being thrown for each complete swing of each arm. This intermittent and rapid rotative movement of each of the arms 35 and 37 is provided by separate and generally identical drive mechanisms 229 (see FIGURE '13), both of which are driven off the cross shaft 215 and include a coil spring 231 and a cam controlled latch 233 operable to releasably anchor one end of the coil spring 231 while the other end is rotated so as to cock or to store energy in the coil spring. As the drive mechanisms are generally identical except for being left and right handed and except for being arnanged so that the arms 35 and 37 operate alternately, only the drive mechanism associated with the arm 35 will be described.

More particularly, the cross shaft 215 has fixed thereto, outwardly of each of the upright posts 47 and 49, a cam 235 which includes a camming surface 237 and an outwardly projecting central hub with a radial slot 239 therein. The coil spring 231 is located around the hub with its inner end fixed in the slot 239. The outer end of the coil spring 231 includes a rebent portion defining a hook 241 for engagement with the edge 243 of a stepped ear or tab 245 extending toward the main body 21 from the adjacent side of the arm 35. As will be seen, the

earv 245 watts both with the latch 233. and with the coil spring'231 to cause ballrhrowing activity. The coil spring 231 is proportioned and theslot 239 in the hub is located such that immediately after ball throwing action of the arm 35, when'the coil spring 231 is not under tension, thehook 2411 is somewhat angularly displaced,

rearwardly with respect to the direction of angular rot-a. tion of the cross shaft 215, from the edge 243 on the car 245 ofthe arm 35'. 'Encas-ing the coil spring 23-1 is a shell 247 which prevents hindering of the rotative moveposed leg 253 whichis pivotally connected at its outer 'end to the cross beam 51 so that the shorter or vertical leg 255 lies flush against the outside of, the upright 'post 47. As shown, the short leg 255 also includesa pair of Wings 257 which engage the front and rear faces of the upright 'post 47 to' guide pivotal movement of the L shaped member 251. Also provided are suitable biasing means urging the L shaped member 251 into flush-rela tion to the cross beam 51 and upright post 47. In the disclosed construction, this means takes the (form of a leaf spring 259 suitably attached, as by' a rivet (not shown), to the inside of the main body 21.

Projecting from the vertical leg 255 of the L shaped member 251 is a stop or tab 261 which is engaged at its lower edge by the camming surface 237 and is engage ablealongits'forward face by edge 263 of the stepped car 245. Engagement of the stop 261 by'the ear 245 cup 223 while, at the same time, the adjacent upper ball I locatesthe arm 35 in the'downwardly hanging position and prevents rotation of the arm by the coil spring 231 except when the stop 261 is elevated out of engagement with the car 245 by action of the earn 235.

More specifically, in operation, after the arm 35 has completed its ball throwing movement, it hangs in a vertical position with the ear 245 engaged with the stop 261 on the L shaped member 251, which member is held in flush engagement with the cross beam 51 and upright post 47 by the leaf spring 259; At the same time, the

to anchor the. outer end of the coil spring, and to thereby cause fcocking of the coil spring incident to continued rotation of the cross shaft.

stop 261 so I88 to disengage it from the car 245 and permit rapid swinging of the arm 35, under the influence of the coil spring 231, counterclockwise, as seen in FIGURES 12 and 13. This fast rapid motion results in throwing of one of the balls 219 from the cup 223 at the end of the arm 35 Ias the arm passes through the top of its path.

Passage of the balls 219, one for each rotation of each of the arms 35 and 37, from the magazine in the main part 217 of the arm into the cup 223 is facilitated by the This rotation of the cross shaft .215 also servesto subsequently pivotally elevate the before-mentioned ball feeding device 227, seen best in is provided on the outside of the cup 223 a lug 269 which prevents lover-travel of the lever 265 in the counterclockwise direction, as shown in FIGURE 12. The bell-crank lever 265' is shiftable clockwise, as seen in FIGURE 12,

7 against the action of the biasing spring 267 from a posi tion preventing passage of the balls from the magazine and through the bottom of the intermediate part 225 into to the bracket 285.

, s V the cup, to a positionpermitting passage fromth'e inter mediate part 225 of the lowermost ball therein to the cup.

' 223. More specifically, the upper arm 271 of the lever 265 has at its forward end a transverselyprojecting, outwardly convex plate or section 273 which has generally a radius of curvature corresponding to that of theballs 219,"and which serves generally to prevent passage of: balls 219from the magazine to the cup. However, when r the lever is rotated clockwise, as seen in FIGURElZ,

from its position closing the bottom of the intermediate part 225, the lowermost ball is permitted to fall into the is restrained from movement into the cup by engagement of the top edge of the transverse curved section 273.

Movement of the bell-crank lever 265 against 'theaction of the biasing spring 267 from its position closing I the opening at the bottom of the intermediate part 225 is provided, as the arm is rotated upwardly and backwardly from its vertically hanging position, by engage-- merit of a lug 275 extending from the lower end of the: lever. arm 277 with a projection 279 on the adjacent, side gized. More specifically, the eyeballs, as seen best in FIGURE 4, are generally of identical construction, each being of rounded, generally conical formation, including a rearward serrated cylindrical portion 231 in meshing engagement with the corresponding portion of the other eyeball. The eyeballs are mounted at the forward end of 'a pair of shafts 283, each shaft being journalled in a bracket 235 fixed to the cross beam 51. Suitable means are provided, such as the enlarged shaft portions 287,101 preventing axial displacement of the shafts The eyeballs 3-1 and 33 are driven for rotation through a sheave or pulley 289 fixed to one of the shafts 283,.

band, to a second sheave or pulley 293 fixed, as seen in FIGURES 3 and 6, exterior of the plate 54 on the fourth cross shaft 77.0f the gear train 57. Thus, when the motor is in operation, one eyeball is rotated in the clockwise direction while the other eyeball'is rotated in the counter.

a very unvitality simulating noise effect. The noise effect produced by the disclosed construction is suggestive of an imaginary heartbeat, is produced at predetermined time intervals, and comprises two closely spaced high-pitched sounds.

More specifically, the sound producing means 295 in cludes, asseen best in FIGURES 2 and 3, two generally identical sound makers 297 which are located in a recess T in the platform 45. Each of the sound makers 297 includes a resilient bulb or bellows 299 which is collapsible and a reed 301 which produces a squeaking sound inci dent to inflow of air through the reed intothe bulb 299. Collapse of each of the bulbs in closely timed relation to provide the desired noise effect is provided by a pair of paddle levers 303 which are pivotally, carried ona bracket 305 mounted on the platform 45., The forward end of. each of the paddle levers 303 isengageable with one of a pair of tabs 307 struck from opposite sides'of a disk 309 mounted exterior of the side plate'53 on the third cross shaft 75 in the gear train 57. Thus, for each rotation of the disk 309, each of the sound makers 297 is collapsed tosubsequently produce a squeakingsound, The time interval between the sounding operation 'of each of the soundmakers2-97 in onecycle is considerably smaller 283 relative This provision, cou-' includes suit-' than one half the time interval between repeated sounding operation of the same sound maker. In this manner, the closely occurring operation of the sound makers 297 can be considered one composite sound which is repeated at intervals as long as the motor is running.

As previously indicated, travel of the robot 17, launching of the rocket 117, and throwing of the balls 219, is con-trolled by the remote unit 19 which is mechanically connected to the robot, as seen in FIGURES 2. and 8, through a flexible cable 311 including a tube 313 of suitable plastic material. More particularly, in the disclosed construction, the remote unit :19 is intended to simulate a microphone and includes a knob 315 which is selectively movable so as to control the-travel of the robot, release of the rocket 117, and ball throwing operation of the arms 35 and 37. Also included in the remote unit is a motor control switch 317 which is biased open by a mechanical lock out and which is closable, after release of the lock out, by sound command. The mechanical lock out incorporates a button 319 which is biased so as to automatically return the switch to the open position.

Still more particularly, the remote unit 19 includes a casing 321 which generally contains the operating components and a cover plate 323 for the casing. Movement of the slide 79 in the robot to control robot activity is governed by the movement of a flexible steel wire or shaft 325 which is incased in a plastic covering 327 and which extends within the flexible tube 313. At one end, the wire 325 is connected to the slide 79' in the robot and at its other end is connected to a movable block 329 carried in a guideway 331 in the casing 321. Movement of the block 329 in the casing therefor results in corresponding movement of the slide 79 in the robot.

The guideway 321 includes a rack 333, while the block plate 323, indicates the position of the block and the cor-Q responding robot activity.

As pointed out before, electrical control of the motor 55 is provided by an audio switch 317 having a mechanical lock out feature. More specifically, one of the terminals of the motor 55 is connected by a lead 341 to a contact post 343 in the casing, which lead 341 extends within the flexible tube 313 of the cable 311. In addition, one of the terminals of the battery pack 61 is connected by a second lead 3.45 to a second contact post 347 located in the casing in adjacent relation to the first contact post 343. The lead 345 extends within the flexible tube 313 of the cable 311.

The contact posts 343 and 347 are electrically connectable by a bridging contact or bus bar 349 which is fixed .to a diaphragm 351 pivotally mounted in the casing 321. The position of the diaphragm is controlled, in part, by a light, lover-the-center tension spring 353 which, as shown, connects a point near the center of the diaphragm 351 with a point in the casing spaced on the other side from the pivotal axis of the diaphragm. Thus, the overthe-center spring 353 operates either to bias the diaphragm 351 toward either of a first, open position in which the bus bar 349 is spaced from the contact posts 343 and 347 and a second, closed position in which the bus bar 349 engages both posts 343 and 347 to electrically energize the motor. I V The strength of the over-the-center spring 353 which biases the diaphragm 351 is such that air pressure accompanying adjacent, moderately loud vocal activity will throw the diaphragm 351 from its open to its closed position. In this regard, the portion of the cover plate 323 overlying the diaphragm 351 is slotted or otherwise 10 formed to provide for the passage of pressure waves accompanying a vocal command.

The mechanical lock out feature of the motor control switch 317 includes the button 319 which extends inwardly thnough one side of the casing into a position under the diaphragm 351. The button 319 includes an extending part 355 which passes through an opening in a wall 357 in the casing so as, in cooperation with the opening in the 'side of the casing, to guide in and out movement of the button. Carried on the extending part 355 between the wall 357 and the main part of the button 319 is a spring 359 which biases the button outwardly of the casing. In this regard, the button 319 includes a lug 361 which engages the casing to prevent displacement of the button out of the casing.

Biasing of the diaphragm 351 by the button 319 to its open position is provided by an inclined cam surface 363 on the button, which surface is operable through an opening 365 in the diaphragm and against one edge of the opening 365. The inclination of the cam surface 363 is such that, incident to inward movement of the button 319, the cam surface rides out of engagementwith the before-mentioned edge to permit movement of the diaphragm to its closed position. However, whenever the button is released, the spring 359 urges the button 319 outwardly of the casing, whereby the cam surface 363 engages the diaphragm 351 so as to return the diaphragm to its open position. In this regard, the strength of the button biasing spring 359 is greater than that of the overthe-center spring 353 and, thus, when the button is not depressed into the casing, the motor 55 is automatically disconnected from the batteries 59.

In order to close the circuit to the motor '55, the button 319 must first be pressed inwardly to disengage the cam surface. 363 from the diaphragm 351 so as to permit subsequent movement of the diaphragm from its normally open to its closed position, followed by a vocal command sufficiently loud to overcome the over-thecenter spring 353 and thereby carry the diaphragm to its closed position; The circuit to the motor 55 is automatically opened whenever the button 319 is released from its inwardly pressed position. This arrangement provides the important advantage of assuring that the motor circuit 55 will always be open when the remote unit is not in use. In summary, the disclosed robot 17 constitutes a selfpowered movable mechanism which is capable of various activities and which is controllable from the remote unit' 19. This remote unit includes the switch 317 which is operable to energize the motor 55 incident to a sound command and which incorporates an automatic .lock out feature for de-energizing the motor. Also included in the remote unit is'a selector by means of which various of the operating mechanisms in the robot can be connected and disconnected to the motor to selectively control the activity of the robot. These features include selective travel of the robot along a supporting surface, firing of the rocket 117 from the head 29 of the robot,; and successive throwing of a plurality of the balls 219 carried in the arms 35 and 37 of the robot. Provision is also made for continuous powering by the motor of the sound producing means 295 and of the pair of constantly rotating eyeballs 31' and 33. i

Various of the features of the invention are set forth in the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. An animated toy comprising a housing, at least two spaced wheels mounted on said housing for rotation so as to propel said housing for movement along a supporting surface, motor means on said housing, means rota-tably supported on said housing and operable to cause an object to be thrown from the toy as said means is rotated, relative to said housing, means on said housing for releasably holding a projectile for discharge, means for releasing said projectile-holding means and for causing discharge of the projectilegselective connecting means on said housing for selectively connecting said motor to said wheels so, as to drive said housing or to said means for releasing said projectile-holding means soasto cause discharge of the projectile, and for selectively connecting said motor to said rotatablethrowing means so as to throw objects from said toy, and means remote from said housing and mechanically connected to said selective connecting means to provide for controlled operation of the latter to effect movement of the toy along its supporting surface, discharge of a projectile from the toy, or cause the toy to throw, an objectsbyoperation of said rotatable means.

2 .-,An.|animated toy, comprising a housing at least'two spaced'wheels mounted on said housing for independent rotation so as to propel said housing for movement along a supporting surface, motor means on said housing, means on said housing for releasably holding a projectile, means for releasing said projectile-holding means, means on said from said toy, means remote said wheels so as to selectively drive said housing ahead,

to the left and tothe right, and to said means for releasing said projectile-holding means so as to cause discharge of the projectile, and means remote from said housing for selectively controlling said selective connecting means, and means mechanically connecting said controlling means to said selective connecting means whereby operation of saidtoy can be controlled.

3.An animated toy comprising a housing having an opening therein with a door swingable relative to a position closing said opening, at least two space-d wheels mounted on said housing for independent rotation so as to propel said housing for movement along a supporting surface, motor'means on said housing, means on said housing for releasably holding a projectile within said housing in position for discharge through said opening, means for -moving said door 'firom said closed position to an open position to facilitate discharge from said housing of said projectile and for releasingsaid projectile-holding means,

means on said housing for selectively connecting said motor to each of said wheels so as to selectively drive said housing ahead, to the left and to the right, and for connecting said motor to said means for moving said door and for releasing said projectile-holding means so as to cause discharge of the projectile from said housing, means remote from said housing for selectively controlling said selective connecting means, and means mechanically con necting said controlling means to said selective connecting means whereby operation of said toy can be controlled.

' 4. animated toy comprising a housing, at least two spaced wheels mounted on said housing for rotation so tively controlling-saidselective connecting means, and

means mechanically connecting said controlling means to objects, means on said housing for releasably holding a projectile for discharge, means for releasing said projectileholding means,-means on said housing for selectively connecting said motor to each of said wheels so as to selectively drive said housing ahead, to the left and to the right,

to said means for releasing said projectile-holding means so as to cause discharge of the projectile, andtosaicl throwing means so as to throw objects from said toy,

means remote from said housing for selectively controlling said selective connecting means, and means mechanically connecting said controlling means to said selective connecting means whereby operation of said toy can be controlled.

housing for selectively connecting said motor to said Wheels so as to drive said housing andto said means for operating said projectile-holding and sound-producing means so as to cause discharge of the projectile and production of the sound effect, means remote from said housing for selectively controlling said selective connecting means, and means mechanically connecting said controlling means to said selective connecting means whereby operation of said toy can be controlled.

5'. An animated toy comprising a housing, at least two' spaced Wheels mounted on said housing for independent rotation so as to propel said housing for movement along a supporting surface, motor means on said housing, means on said housing operable incident to rota-j tionfor throwing objects, means on said housing for selectively connecting said motor to each of said wheels so as to selectively drive said housing ahead, to the left and to the right, and to said throwing means so as to throw objects 7. The combination in a toy of a frame, first and second wheels supported by said frame for independent rotation'so as to propel said frame along a supporting sur face, a motor, first means mounted on said frame for movement to and from between a first position drivingly connecting said first wheel to said motor and a sec- 7 ond position locking said first wheel against rotation,

second means supported on said frame for movement to and from between a first position drivingly connecting said second wheel to said motor and a second position locking said second wheel against rotation, and means for selectively positioning said first and second means in said first positions so as to selectively drive said toy ahead, to the'right, and to the left.

'8. The combinationin a toy ofa frame, first and second wheels supported by said frame for independent rotation so asto propel said frame along a supporting surface, a motor, first means mounted on said frame for movement to and from between a first position drivingly connecting said first wheel to said motor and a second position locking said first wheel against rotation, second means supported on said frame for movement to and from between a first position drivirrgly connecting said second wheelto said motor and a second position lockingsaid second wheel against rotation, means biasing said first and second means toward said first positions, and selectively positionable means for selectively retaining said first and second means in said second positions against the action of said biasing means for selectively enabling movement, under the action of said biasing means, of said first and second means to said first positions, so as to cause the toy to stop, to advance, to turn left, and to turn right.

9. The combination in a toy of a frame, first and second wheels supported by said frame for independent notation so as to propel said frame along a supporting surface, a motor, a first pivotal means mounted on said frame for movement to and from between a first position drivingly connecting said first wheel to said motor and a second position locking said first wheel against rotation, a second pivotal means supported on said frame for movement to and from between a first position drivingly connecting said second wheel to said motor and a second position locking said second wheel against rotation, means biasing said first and second pivotalmeans toward said first positions, selectively positionable means for retaining said first and second pivotal means in said second positions against the action of said biasing means for selectively enabling movement, under the action of said biasing means, of said first and second pivotal meansto said first positions, control means remote from said frame for selectively locating said selectively positionable from said housing for selec- 13 means so as to selectively control movement of said frame, including movement of said frame ahead, to the left, and to the right, and means mechanically connecting said selectively positionable means and said remote control means.

10. An animated toy comprising a housing; a motor mounted on said housing; first and second wheels supported by said housing for independent rotation so as to propel said housing along a supporting surface; a first means mounted on said housing for movement to and from between a first position drivingly connecting said first wheel to said motor and a second position locking said first wheel against rotation; a second means supported on said housing for movement to and from between a first position drivingly connecting said second wheel to said motor and a second position locking said second wheel against rotation; means biasing said first and second means toward said first positions; means on said housing for throwing objects by rotative force; said means including a shaft connectable to said motor, journalled in said housing, and extending outwardly of said housing; an arm rotatably carried on said shaft; said arm including a receptacle adapted for receiving an object to be thrown, being spaced from said shaft, and being open in the direction of rotation of said shaft; and means for drivingly connecting said shaft to said arm to cause the latter to be rotated so as to throw the object from said receptacle; said drive-connecting 'means including a spring having one end fixed to said shaft and having its other end engageable with said arm to cause rotation of said arm in the direction of rotation of said shaft; latch means carried by said housing for releasably engaging said arm to prevent rotation thereof, whereby said spring is tensioned incident to continued rotation of said shaft; and rotary means carried by said shaft for releasing the engagement of said latch means with said am after tensioning of said spring so as to cause rapid rotation of said body for throwing the object (from said receptacle; means on said housing for holding and firing a rocket and for producing a sound effect subsequent to discharge of said rocket; said last mentioned means comprising support means on said housing; an elongated plunger on said support means; said plunger extending partially in outwardly projecting relation to said support means and being movable inwardly and outwardly ofsaiid support means; a member movable on said plunger axially thereof between the outer end thereof and said support means; a compression spring on said plunger contained between said movable member and said support means; said spring normally maintaining said movable member adjacent the outer end of said plunger; a rocket mountable on said plunger in abutting relation to said movable member and against the action of said compression spring; means releasably holding said rocket on said plunger against the action of said compression spring; a sounding chamber including a diaphragm mounted on said support means; and means for vibrating said diaphragm incident to outward movement of said plunger occurring subsequent to discharge of said rocket; selectively movable means on said housing for connecting said motor to said first and second wheels by movement to and from between positions retaining said first and second pivotal means in said second positions against the action of said biasing means and positions enabling selective movement, under the action of said biasing means, of said first and second pivotal means to said first positions, so as to control travel of the toy, for connecting said motor to said means for releasing said rocket-holding and sound producing means so as to cause discharge of said rocket and the production of a sound eifect and for connecting said motor to said shaft so as to cause object throwing movement of said arm; means remote from said housing for selectively controlling said selectively movable means comprising a casing; a first flexible lead extending from said casing to an electrical power source;

means; means mechanically shiftable on said casing between various positions; and flexible means mechanically connecting said shiftable means with said selectively movable means so as to obtain related movement of said' selectively movable means, thereby controlling the ac t-ivity of the toy.

11. An animated toy comprising a housing, at least two spaced wheels mounted on said housing for rotation so as to propel said housing for movement along a supporting surface, motor means on said housing, means on said housing operable incident to rotation for throwing objects, a support means on said housing, an elongated plunger on said support means, said plunger extending partially in outwardly projecting relation to said support means and being movable inwardly and outwardly of said support means, said plunger having a stop thereon spaced from,- said support means, a projectile receivable on said plunger, a member movable on said plunger between said stop and said support means, a compression spring on said plunger contained between said movable member and said support means, said spring normally maintaining said movable member adjacent said stop, sound producing means on said support, said sound producing means being mechanically connectable to said plunger and being operable incident to movement of said plunger outwardly of said support means, means on said housing for releasably holding said projectile on said plunger, means for releasing said projectile-holding means, whereby when said projectile is received on said plunger for subsequent release, said plunger is moved inwardly of said support means and said movable memher is engageable by said projectile for movement inwardly of said stop so as to confine said spring, whereafter when said projectile is released, said movable member moves outwardly along the plunger to adjacent said stop so as to fire said projectile, and then causes outward movement of the plunger to operate said sound producing means, means on said housing for selectively connecting said motor to said wheels so as to drive 'said housing, to said means for releasing said projectile-hold ing means so as to cause discharge of the projectile, and to said throwing means so as to throw objects from said boy, means remote from said housing fior selectively controlling said selective connecting means, and means mechanically connecting said controlling means to said selective connecting means whereby operation of said toy can be controlled.

12. An animated toy comprising a housing, at least two spaced wheels mounted on said housing for rotation so as to propel said housing for movement along a supporting surface, motor means on said housing, a body carried on said housing for rotation, a receptacle on said body adapted for receiving an object to be thrown, said receptacle being spaced from the axis of rotation of said body and being open in the direction of rotation of said body, a magazine in said body for containing a plurality of the objects, said magazine having an aperture communicating with said receptacle for passage of the objeots from said magazine to said receptacle, means for controlling passage of the objects from said magazine to said receptacle incident to rotation of said body, said passage controlling means including a trip on said housing and a shiftable member on said body located adjacent said aperture, said shifitable member being engage- 15 I able by said trip incident to rotation of said body, and operable incident to engagement by said trip, to move relative to said aperture so as to permit the passage of a single object into said receptacle, means on said housing for releasably holding a projectile for discharge, means for releasing said projectile-holding means, means on said housing cfior selectively connecting said motor to said wheels sons to drive said housing, to said means for releasing said projectile-holding means so as to cause dis-.

charge of the'projectile, and to said rotatable body so as to throw objects from said toy, means remote from said housing for selectively contnolling said selective con-- necting means, and means mechanicallytconnecting said controlling means to said selective connecting means whereby operation of said toy can becontrolled.

' 13. An animated toy comprising a housing, at least two spaced wheels mounted on said housing for rotation so as to propel said housingior movement along a supporting surface, electric motor means on said housing, means on said housing operable incident to rotation for throwing objects, means'on said'housing for releasably holding a projectile for discharge, means for releasing said projectile-holding means, means on said housing for selectively connecting said motor to said wheels so asto drive said housing, to said means for releasing said projectile-holding means so as to cause discharge of the projectile, and to said throwing means 'so:as to throw objects from said toy, means remote from said housing for selectively controlling said selective connecting means,

, means mechanically connecting said controlling means to for movement incident to a vocal command, electrical.

contact means carried by said rnovablemember for travel therewi-th, incident ,to the vocal command, to a position electrically connecting said leads,'and means normally 5 biasing said movable member away from said position I electrically connecting said'leads, said biasing means being manually de-activatable, whereby operation of said my can be controlled.

14. An animated toy comprising a housing, at least- ,two spaced wheels mounted on said housing for rotation so as to propel said housing for movement along a sup porting sur face, motor means on saidhousing, a pair of generally identical noisemakers in said housing, means connected with said motor means for alternately and repeatedly actuating said noisemakers for sounding operaapart wheels mounted on said housing insupporting retion in such relation that the time interval between repeated sounding operations of one of said. noisemakers is substantially greater than twice the smaller time interval between alternate sounding operations of said pair.

for releasably holding a projectile for discharge, means for releasing said projectile-holding means, means on said housing for selectively connecting said motor torsaid wheels so as to drive said housing, to said means for re- 15 r as to throw objects from said toy, means remote from said housingfor selectively controlling said selective connecting meansyand means mechanically connecting said controlling means to said selective connecting means Whereby'operation of said toy can be controlled.

15. A toy comprising a housing, at least two spacedapart wheels mounted on said housing inzsupporting relat-ion thereto soas to afford movement of thehousingalong arsupporting surface, meansonsaidhousing for;

releasably holding a-projectile andifor releasing said pro- 7 jec'tilefor, aerial flight, rotatable means on saidhousing operableincident to rotation thereof for throwing an object carried by said rotatable. means, motor means supported on said housing, "and means on said housing for selectively connecting said motor to said wheels, to;

said projectile holding and releasing means, and to said rotatable means, so as to propelthe, toy, cause dischargev oi the projectile, and effect throwing of an object bysaid rotatable means, respectively.

16. A toy comprising a housing, at least, two spaced apart wheels mounted on said housing in supporting relation thereto so as to aflord movement of the housing along a supportingsurface, means rotatably mounted on said housing and operable incident to rotation thereof for throwing an object carried by said means, motor means supported on said housing, and means'on said'housing for selectively connecting said'motor to said-wheels and' to said rotatable means so as to propel the toy and effect.

throwing of an object by the rotatable means as desired.

17. A toy comprising a housing, at least two spacedlation thereto so as to afford movement of the housing alonga supportin surface, rotatable means on said housing operable incldentto rotation thereof for throwing an object carried by said means, said rotatable means,

and comprising means controlling passage of the objects j from said magazine to said receptacle and operable upon rotation of said rotatable means to permit passage of a single object into said receptacle, motor means sup: ported on said housing, and means on said housing .for connecting said motor to said wheels and to said rotatable means, so as to propel thetoyand eifect throwing of an object by said rotatable means as the latter is rotated relative to said housing.

i References Cited in the file of this patent I UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,880,138 H-ubl, Sept. -27, 1932 1,900,353 Marchetti Mar. 7, 1933 2,133,038 Muller et al Oct. 1 1, 1938 2,640,295 Auler et al June 2, 1953 2,775,846 Gazda Jan. 1, 1957 2,777,252 Tancredi et a1 Jan. 15, 1957 2,778,158 Ernst Jan. 22, 1957 2,781,753 Formis Feb. 19, 1957. 2,815,743 Brunderman Dec. 10, 1957 2,877,757 Gioragnoli Mar, 17, 1959 2,881,559 Glass Apr. 14, 1959 2,928,208 Wintriss Mar. 15, 1960 2,943,619 I Dunbar July 5, 1960 n -v y

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3171230 *Feb 25, 1963Mar 2, 1965Marvin Glass & AssociatesElectrically actuated sounding toy
US3195268 *Mar 1, 1963Jul 20, 1965Marvin Glass & AssociatesDoll with changeable expression
US3269055 *Jul 29, 1963Aug 30, 1966Kenneth S GoldfarbArticulated toy for spinning tops
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US5100153 *Feb 20, 1990Mar 31, 1992Welte Gregory AGame using radio-controlled vehicles
US5125668 *Apr 24, 1990Jun 30, 1992Welte Gregory AGame involving toy vehicles
US7938708Nov 3, 2006May 10, 2011Mattel, Inc.Articulated walking toy device
US7946902 *Nov 3, 2008May 24, 2011Mattel, Inc.Articulated walking toy
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Classifications
U.S. Classification446/191, 124/7, 200/61.1, 124/26, 446/308, 124/50
International ClassificationA63H13/10, A63H30/00, A63H11/00, A63H30/04, A63H11/10, A63H13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H11/10, A63H13/10, A63H30/04, A63H13/00
European ClassificationA63H30/04, A63H11/10, A63H13/10, A63H13/00