Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3103903 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 17, 1963
Filing dateJan 25, 1960
Priority dateJan 25, 1960
Publication numberUS 3103903 A, US 3103903A, US-A-3103903, US3103903 A, US3103903A
InventorsBroadrick Ed B, Ledford Glenn J, Mcdowell Herbert S
Original AssigneeLees & Sons Co James
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tufting machine yarn feeding means
US 3103903 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Seph- 17,' E. 'B.BROADRICK ETAL 3,103,903 I T UFTING MACHINE'YARN 'FEEDING' MEANS SePf- 17, 1963 E. B. BRoADRlcK ETAL 3,103,903

TUF'TINGv MACHINE YARN FEEDING MEANS 3 Sheets- Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 25, 1960 1963 E. B. BRoADRlcK ETAL Y 3,103,903

TUFTING MACHINE YARN FEEDING MEANS Sept. 17,

United States Patent G 3,103,963 TUFTING h/IACHEHNE YARN FEEDENG MEANS Ed B. Broadrielr, Tiger, Glenn l. Ledtord, Clayton, and Herbert S. McDowell, Mountain City, Ga., assigner-s to .lames Lees and Sons Company, Bridgeport, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Filed San. 25, 1960, Ser. No. 4,445 11 Claims. (Cl. 1112-79) This invention pertains to pattern attachments for pile fabric tufting machines and more particularly to a universal roller-type pattern attachment having disconnectable roller segments permitting use of the same attachment Ifor various fabric widths.

In the carpet industry the customary widths for broad fabrics are 9', 12', 15', and 18'. Where it is desired to produce a fabric having a Sculptured pile surface, a wellknown form of pattern attachment is used which produces this surface due tto controlled feed and/or tens-ion in the pile yarns. Such an attachment usually comprises a series of rollers mounted in banks in front of and over the tufting machine proper. Groups of yarns are fed over pairs of rollers, eac-h pair of which has two or more speeds controlled by electrically operated clutches. A pattern chain or cylinder operates suitable electrical connections for energizing the electrical means to vary the relative feed of the yarns threaded around each pair of rollers. if a particular broad machine, say wide, is fully lthreaded and it should be desired to produce a narrower Afabric on this machine only 9' or 12' wide, it is necessary to doit all of the unused pile yarn ends from the pattern attachment. This requires unthreading them from around ;12 or 14 rollers.

'Ilhe present invention contemplates the use of segmented rollers for the pattern attachment which may be disconnected either manually or electrically from the center section of each roller, thus permitting the unused yarn ends to remain on the stationary segments and thereby avoid the necessity for the unthreading and rethreading operation. In the preferred embodiment of the invention an outer disconnectable segment is placed on each of the roller shafts. This permits a reduction in width from approximately l5' to l2'. A second disconnectable roller segment can then be, if desired, disconnected `from the center section at each end so that the effective width is only 9'. Of course, the outer two or three segments on each roller can, if desired, be disconnected as a unit, thus directly changing from 18' or l5' to 9' Widths.

The invention also contemplates the use of suitable means for rotationally locking the disconnected segments so that even though the roller shafts are turning in the segments there will be no possibility that the unused segments will rotate with the consequent effect of tang'ling yarn ends on these segments.

A primary object of the invention, therefore, is to provide in a roller pattern attachment for a pile fabric tufting machine at least one disconnectable segment for the yarn feed pattern rollers.

A further object of the invention is to provide in a roller pattern attachment for a pile ,fabric tufting machine a plurality of axially movable segments on each end of each pattern roller and means for locking the segments together in driving relationship with the roller shaft.

A further object fof the invention is to provide in apparatus of the type described, spring loaded detent means for retaining the disconnectable segments in an interlooked position.

A still further object of the invention is to provide electromagnetic means for retaining the segments in interlocked and driving position.

3,163,963 Patented Sept. i7, 1963 lee A still further object is to provide in apparatus of the type described means for retaining disconnected roller segments in a fixed position.

Further objects will be apparent from the specification and drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is la schematic sectional view of a broad pile fabric tufting machine having a seven roller pattern attachment,

FIG. 2 is a schematic view of the pattern attachment of FIG. 1 showing the locking means for preventing rotation of disconnected roller segments,

FIG. 3 is a Itop view of a pair of pattern rollers as seen at 3-3 of FIG. 1,

FIG. 4 is an enlarged sectional detail as seen at 4 4 of FIG. 3,

FIG. 5 is an enlarged sectional detail as seen at 5--5 of FIG. 3,

FIG. 6 is an enlarged sectional detail as seen ait 6--6 of FIG. 3,

FIG. 7 is a section as seen at 7--7 of HG. 5,

FIG. 8 is a perspective of the connection of FIG. 6,

FIG. 9 is an enlarged sectional ldetail similar to FIG. 5 but showing electrical locking means for the disconnectable segments,

FIG. 10 is a section as seen at lll-ltl of FIG. 9,

FIG. 1"1 is a section as seen at 11-11 of FIG. 9,

FIG. ,12 is a section as seen at 12-12 of FIG. 9,

FIG. #'13 is a View similar to FIG. 9v showing a modified form of locking device :for the roller segments,

FIG. 14 is a section as seen at 14--14 `of FIG. 1'3,

FIG. l5 is a section as seen at 1'5-15 of FIG. 13,

FIG. 16 is a schematic showing of a varied form of disconnected segment clamping device, and

FIG. 17 is a sectional view as seen at 117-17 of FIG. 16.

A pile fabric tufting machine of the type on which the present invention is utilized comprises a bed Ztl over which a backing fabric F is 'fed from a pin feed roll 21 over roller ZZ `and around a pin take-up roll 23'. A series of tufting needles 24 are secured in a needle bar 25 supported on rods 26, Z6 and vertically oscillated from the crankshaft 27 through connecting rods 28 A presser foot assembly 29 is connected to the needlebar as is the usual thread jerker 30. The above crankshart and its associated structure is enclosed and -is journaled in an upper housing 31.

'Ilhe needles 24 reciprocate to carry the pile yarn Y through the backing `fabric F at the throat 35 of the tufting machine where a series of loopers 36 engage the yarns Y at each needle and thereby form the pile on the underside of fabric F. The present showing indicates a series of non-cutting loopers which are mounted in a looper bar A37 clamped to looper rockshaft 38 which oscillates to move the loopers into and out of the pile yarns Y.

The pile yarns Y are fed from -a convenient source such as a ereel, not shown, and are separated into groups it? and 4l. Each group is then threaded around a pair of pattern rollers ft2 and 43. Depending upon the nurn- 'ber of groups and the number of yarn ends, the pairs of 'rollers vary from a single pair to as many as seven pai-rs, such as shown in FIG. 1. Although there are actually 14 rollers in the pattern attachment, such an attachment is customarily referred to as a seven roller attachment indicating the number of pairs rather than the nurnber of individual rollers. Each of the yarn sets 40 and 41 is carried through a yarn guide bar 44 in front of its associa-ted roller pair and the yarn sets pass under each feed roller 42 and over the rear roller 43. From thence the yarns pass through `a rear guide bar 45, stationary yarn guides i6 and 47, and then through the yarn jerker 30. Since each pair of rollers in the pattern attachment 3 shown in FiGS. l and 2 is identical to each other pair and they operate in the same manner, the additional rollers have been designated with suitable subscripts which also apply to the associated yarn guides.

Referring now more particularly to FIGS. 3-8, each of the rollers f1.2 4and 43 is, in fact, a :segmented roller having disconnectable sets of segments at each end. Since the construction of each roller is identical, it will he suicient to describe the `front roller 42 of the top pair Ibut each roller in the lower pairs is similar. Front roller 42 is driven through its shaft 50 by the usual driving means, not shown. However, a driving interconnection between the rollers of each pair is provided through a pair of spur gears 51 `and 52 mounted respectively on shaft of roller `42 and shaft 53 of roller 43. `Both rollers are preferably provided with two intermediate supporting bearings shown at 54, 54 in FIG. 3. Describing now particularly roller 42, the center segment 55 of roller 42 is permanently pinned or keyed to shaft 50.

This segment 55 in a broad tufting machine is approximately 9 in length or at least suiciently more than 9 to accommodate all of the pile yarns Y needed to produce a `full 9 width. Each end of roller 42 is provided with three individually disconnectable segments. The lirst segments, approximately 11/2 in length, are designated 6G and 60a, the second pair also approximately ll/z' in length, 61 and 61a, and the third pair which are desirably somewhat longer than 1%. are designated 62 and 62a. The corresponding segments on roller i3 are designated with primed numeral-s in FIG. 3, but it will be understood as stated above that each of the rollers is identical.

Referring now to FIGS. 5 8, the disconnectable drive for the various segments comprises a cut-away portion which may be described as a half sector 65 secured in its corresponding segment, for example, segment 62, by means of screws or rivets 66, 66. The mating segment, for example, 61 (FIG. 8) comprises a collar 67 secured to segment 61 by means of screws or rivets 68, 68 and having a half ysector 69 similar to half sector 65. Opposite faces of half sectors 65 and 69 are provided with spring loaded detents 7) and 71 biased in the `sector by means of compression springs 72 and 73. The mating face of sector 65 is provided with small dimples or depressions 74 and 75 into which the detents 7i) and 71 snap when the segments 61 and 62 are interlocked by means of axial movement on shaft 50. Either or both of the collars 67 and 76 may be provided with antifriction bushings 77 and 7S if desired. Similar bushings are `used with the plain collar 79 at the outboard ends of segments 62, 62', 62a, and 62a. The identical interlocking connection is employed between segments 61, 62; 60, 61; 60a, 61a; 61a, 62a; 62'a, 61a; 61a, ila; 61'; 61', 62 on each pair of rollers 4t2 and 43.

Segments 55, 66, 60a, 6tla, and 69 are permanently secured to their respective shafts 50 and 53 as shown in FIG. 4. A plain collar 30 is pinned -through the sleeve of `segment 6i) and shaft 50 by means of a taper pin 81. Similar 'bushings S2, 83, and S4 are used for segments 55 and 60a and are in turn anchored to shaft Si) by means of taper pins 35, 86, and S7.

In order to prevent rotation of all disconnected segments having yarn ends trained around such disconnected segments, we provide a movable framework assembly 95 (FIG. 2) which is slidable underneath each of the roller shafts to engage the tlats of half sectors 69, etc., thereby preventing .undesired rotation of the disconnected segments. Each assembly is provided with a series of substantially horizontal bars or pins 96, 96 which contact the underside of shafts 50, 53 when moved into an operative or forward position as shown in FIG. 6. Three sets of pins 96 are shown in a retracted position in FIG. 3 whereas the fourth set has been displaced to engage segments 62 and 62 to prevent rotation thereof. Ordinarily the outer segments are not only disengaged on each roller of a pair but also at each end of each roller to provide an approximate reduction in the total width of the fabric of three feet. However, for purposes of illustration, FIGURE 3 at the left end shows rollers 42 and 43 completely interlocked as would be the case for full width operation, but at the right end the outermost segments 62 and 62' have 'been disconnected and nonrotatably anchored by means of pins 96 the corresponding pins for each pair of rollers are identied with a letter exponent corresponding with the pairs of rollers with which they cooperate as seen in FIGURES l and 2. Each framework assembly is supported on rails 97 slidable in sleeves 98 `and provided with stop pins 99 (FIG. 1). Also, it will .be understood that the corresponding segments on each of `the pattern rollers 42 and #53 would normally be disconnected `from top to bottom since the seven groups of yarns would in most patterns extend laterally the full width of the fabric. The pattern rollers illustrated herein have two disconnectable segments at each end thus providing a choice of three widths, namely, 9', l2', and l5'. For 18 tufting machines it is only necessary to add another segment to each end of each roller. In any particular design it might be desirable to disconnect less than all of the corresponding segments of each roller in which event a somewhat modified means for retaining the individual segments would be utilized. An example of such modified locking means would be described more fully in conjunction with FIGS. 16 and 17.

Referring now to FiGS. 9-l5, a modified form of disconnectable driving element for the various segments will be described. Here again it will be understood that the connection for only two segments is illustrated but that the identical device will be employed for each of the various separable segments. In FIGURE 9 a pattern roller segment 1d@ is shown drivingly connected with an adjacent segment 13-1, the latter of which is non-rotatably pinned to shaft 162 through collar 163 and taper pin y16M. In the form of FIGURE 9, segment 191 is provided with an armature 195 of some magnetically permeable material locked in segment 161 by means of electrical insulating material 166. An electrical coil 167 is positioned in segment y15.11B* and likewise is provided with suitable insulating bushings tit and `169. When coil 167 is energized in a manner to be described later, the armature 1125 and electromagnet tightly grip each other to provide a driving connection between the segments 19t) and 161.

rhe electrical connections for energizing and de-energizing coil 107 are carried through the hollow bore 115 of shaft 102 in the form of a pair of electrical leads 116 and `117 terminating at binding posts 113 and 119 mounted on a collar 129 which is fixed to shaft 102. The binding posts are electrically connected to two collector rings 121 and 122 mounted in the face of collar 120. A pair of spring loaded brushes 123, 124 are urged against the respective collector rings 121 and 122 by means of brush springs 125 and 126. Current flows from brush 123 to `coil 167 through pigtail 127. Similarly, current from collector ring 122 is carried through brush 124, pigtail 12S, to coil 167. The coil is maintained in position by means of the dielectric bushing '163 secured by four screws 130, `130. When coil 1637 is dta-energized, relative rotation of segment 166 on shaft 1112 takes place without perceptible axial movement of the segment on the shaft. The opposite end of segment 169 is journaled for this purpose on a collar mounted on an anti-friction bushing 136. Collar 129, however, turns with shaft 162 to prevent fouling of the electrical leads 116 and 117. As soon as the coil 107 is energized by the operator, segment l1G11 is driving/ly connected with segment 101, thus permitting it to rotate as a unit with shaft 192 in the usual manner.

A further modified form is shown in FIG. 13 in which the segment 160 is drivingly connected to segment 101 by means of one or more magnetically displaceable keys or pins which are moved axially in collar 141 by means of coils 1li?. and 165. When in loci-:ing position, as shown at the top of FIG. 13, the pins 14d drivingly connect the collar 141 'with collar v146 pinned to shaft 102 at 147. When pins 140 are retracted due to energization of coils 142 and 145, they are retained by means of three spring detents 150 which are provided with bent up ears 151 as seen in FIG. 13 and anchored to posts 152 by means of screws 153 (-FIG. 14). The detents 150 operate against a spider 154 which mounts and guides the three pins 140. Displacement of the detents by the beveled periphery of the spider serves to lock the three pins in either a driving or disconnected position so that it is only necessary to momentarily energize one of the coils 142 and 145 in order to lo-ck or disconnect the segments 100 and 101. Coil 142 when energized disconnects the segments since it pulls the pins to the right as seen in FIG. 13. To lock the segments the operator merely presses another switch -which energizes momentarily coil 145, thus `shifting the pin assembly. It is therefore unnecessary to have either of the coils energized for a substantial length of time in order to retain the segments in either a driving or a disconnected position. With the electromagnet of FXGURE 9 such indefinite energization of coil 107 must take place regardless of whether the segments are connected or disconnected.

In order to retain the disconnected segments in a relatively stationary position regardless of Whether they are of the mechanical or electrical variety, we provide a bracket 175 (FIG. 17) which extends between adjacent pairs of rollers 42 and 43. The bottom of the bracket 45 has a spring loaded clamp 176 which can be urged into contact with the periphery of rollers 42 and 43 by means of a cam 177 controlled by lever 178. Shaft y179 for the lever is desirably mounted in a pair of bearings 180, 180cm any convenient structural framework member, not shown. Pivoting of lever 17S compresses spring 181 and urges plate 176 against the periphery of rollers 42 and 43 so that they remain stationary when their respective shafts rotate.

It will be understood that the locking means shown in FIGURES 1 and 17 are illustrative of several forms that can be desirably employed to retain disconnected segments in a relatively stationary condition should such procedure be necessary or desirable to prevent fouling of the unused yarns trained over the disconnected segments. Where the friction is extremely slight bet-Ween the disconnected segments and their respective shafts, the drag of the yarn itself may be suicient.

We have thus described an eflicient improvement in pattern attachments for broad tufting machines commonly known as yardage machines in the industry which permits much greater flexibility in the manufacturing operation. lt is no longer necessary for the manufacturer to have different width machines unless he can keep every machine operating at full capacity. With a far lesser number of machines the manufacturer is now able to quickly convert to one or more different widths, thus affecting a s-ubstantial saving in door space required and capital investment.

Having thus described our invention, we claim:

1. A pattern attachment for use with a pile fabric tufting machine having a plurality of needles for inserting pile yarns through a backing fabric, comprising a series of yarn feeder main rollers over pairs of which a 'group of pile yarns is trained, at least one end segment roller on at least one end of each of said main rollers in axial alignment therewith, a shaft for each of said main rollers and its corresponding segment roller with each of said main rollers fixed to its shaft for rotation therewith, interconnecting drive means between the shafts of each pair of main rollers for positively driving same, and means for selectively and drivingly engaging each of said end segment rollers with its associated main roller.

2. Apparatus in accordance with claim l, in which each end segment roller is axially slidable on its shaft into and out of rotational engagement with its corresponding main roller, each main roller and segment roller respectively having complementary half-sectors positioned therein for `detachable interlocking engagement With one another.

3. Apparatus in accordance with claim 2, wherein the half-sector of each segment roller is provided with a spring loaded detent and each complementary half-sector of each main roller is provided with a depression complementary with said detent for retaining the complementary half-sectors in detachable relationship.

4. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1, including means for retaining the end segment roller, when in disconnected engagement from its corresponding main roller, in non-rotational relationship with its corresponding shaft.

5. Apparatus in accordance with claim 4, wherein the retaining means comprises a framework having a series of horizontally extending pins, said pins being movable into and out of engagement with said segment roller, when in a disconnected state, to prevent rotation of same with its associated shaft.

16. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 in which the engaging means comprises an electromagnet, a coil for selectively energizing and tie-energizing said electromagnet, and a magnetically permeable armature positioned to be locked to the magnet when the coil is energized.

7. Apparatus in accordance with claim l in which the engaging means comprises a plurality of pins axially movable with respect to the end segment, an electric coil for moving said pins from a drivingly engaged to a drivingly ydisengaged position, and spring loaded means for retaining the pins in either of said positions.

8. A pattern attachment for use with a pile fabric tufting machine having a plurality of needles for inserting pile yarns through a backing fabric, comprising a series of yarn feeder central rollers over pairs of which a group of pile yarns is trained, at least one end segment roller on each end of said central roller in axial alignment therewith, a shaft for each of said central rollers and its corresponding end segment rollers, with each of said main rollers fixed to its shaft for rotation therewith, in-

terconnecting drive means between the shafts of each` pair of lfeed rollers for positively driving same, detachable locking means between each end segment roller and its associated central roller for connecting one to the other in releasable engagement therewith, and means for retaining the end segment rollers, when in a disconnected state, in non-rotatable relationship.

9. yIn pile fabric tufting apparatus having a throat plate, means for feeding backing fabric across said throat plate, a plurality of oscillating needles Ifor penetrating the fabric as it is fed over the throat plate, and a plurality of pairs of rollers for feeding pile yarn to said needles, the improvement of at least one disconnectable segment roller forming the terminal portion of at least one end of each of said feed rollers and being in axialV alignment therewith, and means for selectively retaining said disconnectable segment rollers in a non-rotatable position when said disconnectable segment rollers are in a disconnected position with respect to said feed rollers.

10. yIn pile fabric tufting apparatus having a throat plate, means yfor feeding backing fabric across said throat plate, a plurality of oscillating needles for penetrating the fabric as it is fed over the throat plate, anda plurality of pairs of rollers :for feeding pile yarn to said needles, the improvement of at least one disconnectable segment roller forming the terminal portion of atleast one end of each of said feed rollers and being in axial alignment therewith, an electromagnet positioned in each of sai-d segment rollers adjacent one end thereof, means for energizing and de-energizing said magnet, an armature in the end of each feed roller associated with its corresponding segment roller, and electrical connections from the coil through the segment rollers.

1l. In pile fabric tufting apparatus having a throat plate, means for feeding backing fabric across said throat plate, a plurality of oscillating needles for penetrating the fabric as it is fed over the throat plate, and a plurality of pairs of rollers for feeding pile yarn to said needles, the improvement of at least one disconnectable segment roller forming the terminal portion of at least one end of each of said feed rollers and being in axial alignment therewith, at least one slidable key member between each of said feed rollers and its associated disconnectable segment roller, a coil for axially sliding said key member into engagement to drivingly disconnect the roller and its associated disconnectable segment roller, a second coil for axially sliding the key member to dis connect the segment roller from its associated roller, and

55 retaining means for the lkey member to hold it in either engaged or disengaged position.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,125,761 Strong Jan. 19, 1915 2,213,552 Scharr Sept. 3, 1940 2,412,013 Shade Dec. 3, 1946 2,712,682 Warner July 12, 1955 2,811,244 MacCaray Oct. 29, 1957 2,876,441 Boyles Mar. 3, 1959 2,932,181 MacCaffray Apr. 12, 1960

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1125761 *Nov 7, 1913Jan 19, 1915Underwood Typewriter CoType-writing machine.
US2213552 *Jul 4, 1939Sep 3, 1940IbmPaper feeding device
US2412013 *Aug 18, 1943Dec 3, 1946Shade Harley OCoupling for drive rolls
US2712682 *Nov 24, 1953Jul 12, 1955American Viscose CorpSpreader guide roll
US2811244 *Oct 27, 1953Oct 29, 1957Masland C H & SonsNeedling pile fabric
US2876441 *Feb 11, 1952Mar 3, 1959Tufted Patterns IncMethod and means for feeding thread in tufting machines
US2932181 *Aug 13, 1958Apr 12, 1960C H Masland And SonsMultiple pattern pickup
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3238591 *Sep 17, 1963Mar 8, 1966Spunize Company Of America IncYarn twist control apparatus and method
US3937156 *Nov 27, 1973Feb 10, 1976Spanel Abram NathanielMethod and means of tufting
US4134348 *Feb 22, 1978Jan 16, 1979Spencer Wright Industries, Inc.Yarn feed roller assembly
US4193358 *Jul 31, 1978Mar 18, 1980Edgar Pickering (Blackburn) LimitedTufting machines
US4382704 *Jan 23, 1978May 10, 1983Mannesmann AktiengesellschaftFriction drive in printers
US5094178 *Mar 22, 1990Mar 10, 1992Tuftco CorporationMethod and apparatus for tufting accent yarns in patterned pile fabric
US5383415 *Dec 21, 1992Jan 24, 1995Burlington Industries, Inc.Textured surface effect fabric and methods of manufacture
US5549064 *Oct 24, 1994Aug 27, 1996Burlington Industries, Inc.Textured surface effect fabric
US5899152 *Dec 11, 1997May 4, 1999Spencer Wright IndustriesYarn feed system for a tufting machine
US6244203Nov 26, 1997Jun 12, 2001Tuftco Corp.Independent servo motor controlled scroll-type pattern attachment for tufting machine and computerized design system
US6283053Dec 20, 1999Sep 4, 2001Tuftco CorporationIndependent single end servo motor driven scroll-type pattern attachment for tufting machine
US6550407Aug 23, 2002Apr 22, 2003Tuftco CorporationDouble end servo scroll pattern attachment for tufting machine
US6758154Jul 5, 2002Jul 6, 2004Kendall JohnstonTufting machine
US6807917Jul 3, 2002Oct 26, 2004Card-Monroe Corp.Yarn feed system for tufting machines
US6834601Aug 5, 2003Dec 28, 2004Card-Monroe Corp.Yarn feed system for tufting machines
US6945183Oct 26, 2004Sep 20, 2005Card-Monroe Corp.Yarn feed system for tufting machines
US7007617Nov 17, 2004Mar 7, 2006Card-Monroe Corp.Gate assembly for tufting machine
US7096806May 5, 2005Aug 29, 2006Card-Monroe Corp.Yarn feed system for tufting machines
US7237497Jan 13, 2006Jul 3, 2007Card-Monroe Corp.Replaceable hook modules
US7284492 *Jan 30, 2007Oct 23, 2007Card-Monroe Corp.Replaceable hook modules
US7347151Aug 30, 2005Mar 25, 2008Card-Monroe, Corp.Control assembly for tufting machine
US7398739Aug 14, 2007Jul 15, 2008Card-Monroe Corp.Replaceable hook module
US7490566May 30, 2007Feb 17, 2009Card-Monroe Corp.Method and apparatus for forming variable loop pile over level cut loop pile tufts
US7597057Oct 31, 2007Oct 6, 2009Card-Monroe Corp.Replaceable looper/hook modules
US7634326Sep 12, 2006Dec 15, 2009Card-Monroe Corp.System and method for forming tufted patterns
US7717051Aug 22, 2005May 18, 2010Card-Monroe Corp.System and method for control of the backing feed for a tufting machine
US7739970Dec 4, 2008Jun 22, 2010Card-Monroe Corp.Method and apparatus for forming variable loop pile over level cut loop pile tufts
US7905187Jul 10, 2006Mar 15, 2011Card-Monroe Corp.Yarn feed system for tufting machines
US7997219Aug 20, 2008Aug 16, 2011Card-Monroe Corp.System and method for facilitating removal of gauge parts from hook bar modules
US8141506Sep 21, 2009Mar 27, 2012Card-Monroe Corp.System and method for control of the backing feed for a tufting machine
US8201509Aug 25, 2010Jun 19, 2012Card-Monroe Corp.Integrated motor drive system for motor driven yarn feed attachments
DE2833928A1 *Aug 2, 1978Feb 22, 1979Pickering Edgar LtdTuftingmaschine
WO1996012843A1 *Oct 25, 1994May 2, 1996Burlington Industries IncTextured surface effect fabric and methods of manufacture
WO1998026123A1 *Nov 21, 1997Jun 18, 1998Cobble Blackburn LtdImproved yarn feed system for a tufting machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification112/80.73, 226/190, 400/609, 400/585, 226/110, 492/14, 492/38, 57/90
International ClassificationD05C15/32, D05C15/00
Cooperative ClassificationD05C15/32
European ClassificationD05C15/32