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Publication numberUS3104307 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 17, 1963
Filing dateJun 10, 1960
Priority dateJun 10, 1960
Publication numberUS 3104307 A, US 3104307A, US-A-3104307, US3104307 A, US3104307A
InventorsGarofalow Donald G, Schlosser Edward P
Original AssigneeGarofalow Donald G, Schlosser Edward P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combination filter, heater and light
US 3104307 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 17, 1963 D. G. GAROFALOW ETAL 3,104,307

COMBINATION FILTER, HEATER AND LIGHT Filed June 10, 1960 2 Sheets-Sheet l I F/ G. 5 6 6 E I 3a 54 53 42 3a 4&9' 42 50 INVENTORS 52 62 62 DONALD 6. GAROFALOW EDWARD SCHLOSSER I I ATTO R N EY Sept. 17, 1963 D. G. GAROFALOW ETAL 3,104,307

COMBINATION FILTER, HEATER AND LIGHT Filed June 10, 1960 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR S DONAL D 6'. GAROFA L 0W EDWARD SO /L OSSER A RNEY Filed time in, race, Sen No. 35,245 ll) Qlairns. (Cl. 219-39) The present invention relates generally to improvements in heating apparatus, and it has specific relation to a combination space heater and light.

There are many different kinds of space heaters on the market using infra-red electric bulbs in combination with a fan for providing a source of auxiliary heat in the form of a space heater, but none of them is very efficient or cap-able of using the light generated by said bulb to illuminate the room in which it is being used.

With the present invention there is provided a very emcient and extremely inexpensive combination space heater and light which overcomes all of the disadvantages of the aforementioned heaters.

An object of the present invention is to provide a simple, inexpensive and eillcient combination space heater and light.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a combination space heater and light which is simple, durable and economical to use, requiring no special electrical outlets or special heavy duty lead-in cords of the type required by most electrical heating appliances.

A further object of the invention is to provide a sim- V ple, efiioient, durable and extremely light-in-weight combination space heater and light, which is not only inexpensive to operate but which has means for controlling the amount of light to be given off without reducing the amount of heat to be discharged therefrom.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a translucent space heater which will give off sufiicient light to illuminate a room with a soft, subdued glow, especially suitable for television viewing.

A further object of the invention is to provide a combination space heater and light which has a sealed heating unit that is safe and efficient to use in that paper or other flammable material dropped accidently or placed against it by children will not be set on fire. 7

Another object of the invention is the provision of a combination space heater and light which has 'a sealed heating unit that is safe and explosion proof when used around flammable vapors, such as vapors from paints, solvents, etc.

A further object of the invention is to provide a combination space heater and light which can be used with a conventional light bulb in the summer time as a combination filter and light instead of a combination heater and light.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a heater and light wherein the incoming air will be preheated by the heat radiating from the heater casing before being passed over said heating elements.

Another object of the invention is to provide a casing for a space heater and light wherein the casing may be made of a colored translucent material, whereby the light emitted by said heater will take on the color of the casing.

Other and further objects and advantages of the invention, which result in simplicity, economy and efliciency, will be apparent from the following detailed description, wherein but three preferred forms of embodiment are shown, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part hereof, wherein like nume1 als indicate like parts, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a vertical sectional View of a combination space heater and light showing one embodiment of the invention;

FlGURE 2 is a cross-sectional view taken substantially along the line 22 of FIGURE 1, the same looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 3 is a modified form of combination heater and light wherein a plurality of heat and light sources are combined, and the combination is equipped with an air purifier and humidifier;

FIGURE 4 is a vertical sectional view of another modifie d form of combination space heater and light, which comprises a double walled casing of translucent material whereby the incoming air is passed between said Walls to preheat the same before it is passed over said heating ele- 'rnenrts.

Referring now to the drawings and particularly to FIGURES 1 and 2, there is shown a combination space heater and light which comprises an opaque housing 10, having upstanding sidewalls ll, l2, l3 and 14-, a removable closed bottom le and a movable top 17. The housing ill may be made of wood, preformed fiber board, metal, plastic or any other suitable materials that are light-in-weight, durable and inexpensive. The bottom 16 is attached in any suitable manner, as by screws, so that it can be removed for servicing and cleaning the fan.

The housing 10 is provided with a plurality of horizontal openings 21 in its sidewalls adjacent its bottom 16, which are adapted to serve as an inlet or intake for the air being drawn thereinto by the fan for heating. Obviously, any other form of opening may be employed that is suitable for the rapid intake of air thereinto. The housing It) is also provided with an air outlet 22, which is likewise shown as a series of horizontal apertures or perforations 22 through the side 12 of the housing 10 adjacent its top. Manifestly, the air outlet 12 may be provided in any other suitable form, which will permit the rapid discharge of heated air from the housing It) in any desired direction.

A conventional ventilating fan 26 is required to draw the air into the housing 10 through the intake opening 21, move it over the source of radiant energy and discharge it from the air outlet 22. Preferably, it should be mounted within the housing ill and on the bottom 16 adjacent the air intake openings 21, whereby the outside air may be quickly and efliciently drawn into the housing 10. The fan 26 is electrically operated, and receives its electricity from an outside source of supply (not shown) through a conventional electric cord 27, having a plug 28, which can be inserted in any standard electric outlet (not shown).

A source of radiant energy, Which is shown in the form of a projecting infra-red bulb 31, is used as the heating and lighting unit. The reflector bulb 31 may be mounted within the housing id in any suitable manner. In the present arrangement, it is mounted in a vertically extending socket member 32, which, in turn, is mounted on a horizontal removable supporting platform 3-3, having a plurality of spaced apertures or perforations 34 extending vertically for permitting the rapid passage of unheated air forced by the blades 25 of the fan 26 upwardly therethrough.

Mounted above the source of radiant energy 31 is a suitable removable and replaceable transparent or translucent air filter and heat exchange unit 36. The most etficient transparent and/or translucent heat exchange unit 36 known to date is spun fiber glass, having a density of 5.57 ounces per cubic foot by weight. Fiber glass is sold on the open market in bulk and in various sizes of preformed bats of various thicknesses. These bats can be out with a shears to any size desired. The air filter and heat exchange unit 36 shown in the drawings is made up of two such bats 37 and 38, having a crosssectional area equal to the cross-sectional area of the housing it), and a combined thickness of approximately four inches. The filter unit 36 is so light-in-weight that very little horizontal support is required. In the illustra- 'tions shown in the drawings, the heat exchange unit 3d, consisting of the filtering bats 37 and 38, is positioned on a rigid wire mesh screen 39, which, in turn, is supported by angle inon brackets 4-1 and 42 mounted on and extending along opposite sidewalls 11 and 12. This screen support 39 will prevent the heat exchange unit 36 from being jarred down onto the bulb 31 and becoming scorched or melted.

The fan 26 andinfra-red bulb 31 are connected in parallel to the source of electrical energy, whereby both will be operating at the same time wherever the plug 23 is electrically connected to said sourceof electrical energy.

Referring now to FIGURE 3, there is shown a modification which the invention may assume, wherein a plurality of individual sources of light projecting radiant energy infra-redybulbs are used for increasing the capacity of the heater. In this arrangement, the heater housing 50 has been subdivided by a vertical partition 51, extending from the bottom 52 of the housing to the top of the heat exchange unit or filters 53 and 54, forming two vertically extending heating chambers 56 and 57, each chamber having its own source of radiant energy 53 and '59.

In this modification, the closed bottom 52 is provided with feet 61, which raise it off the floor, and the air intake openings 62 are vertically extending apertures through that part of the bottom surrounding the fan 26. The top of the housing 50 is closed by a removable glass or'plastic baffle plate member 64, which is supported by brackets 41 and 42 and permits light to pass therethrough' but not the heated air stream passing through the heat exchange unitor filter 53. The moving air stream is deflected downwardly by the bafile plate 64 and through the second heat exchange unit or filter 54, which, in turn,

' is heated by a second infra-red projecting bulb 59. In

air absorbs more heat, whereupon it passes through the apertures 34 of the supporting platform '33, passing over a pan of water 66, thereby absorbing moisture. The heated airthen passes out through the rotatable circular air outlet 67. By making the air outlet '67 rotatable, it can be turned so as to direct the heated discharged air in any desired direction. When 'turned upwandly, as shown in FIGURE 3, the heater t may be used as a convenient hair dryer. 7

The fan 26, the infra-red projecting bulbs 58 and 5 9, and theozone bulb 68, which serves as an air purifier, are to be connected electrically in parallel so that when the plug 28 of the cord 27 is suitably connected to a source of electrical energy all will be operating at the same time.

Referring now to FIGURE 4, there is shown another modification in which the heating elements are similar to those shown in FIGURE 3, but the housing 70 is made of a spaced double walled construction, whereby the incoming air will be passed between said walls and over and around the inner casing for preheating before reaching the fan 26. If the housings are made of compacted fiber glass or plastic having non-burning or non-scorching properties, the material may be colored before forming in which event the finished heater will be either transparent or translucent and capable of emitting a soft subdued colored light or glow throughout its entire surface area.

7 The housing 70 consists of an inner casing 71 and an outer casing 72. The inner casing 72 is subdivided by a vertically extending partition 73, extending from the bottom '74, which is provided with feet 76, to the top of the heat exchangers 77 and 78, forming two vertically extending heating chambers 81 and 82. Each chamber 81 and 82 has its own source of radiant energy 83 and 84. The radiant energy bulbs 83 and 84 are General Electnic GE. 30, bulbs, havingno built-in reflector but a shape similar to a conventional electric light bulb, whereby heat and light is projected in all directions. With this type of bulb, a wire cage or screen 86 is mounted around each of the bulbs 83 and 84. Since the heat and light is being transmitted laterally as well as upwardly, increased heating capacity can be obtained by filling the space around the wire cage or screen 86 with bulk fiber glass 37, which is in addition to the heat exchange units 77 and 78.

In this construction, the air intake is through an opening in the top of the outer casing 72, and passes downwardly through the passageway 89 between said outer casing 72 and inner casing 71. The air is passed through apertures @1 in the lower ends adjacent the closed bottom 74 of the sidewalls of the inner casing 71 and the partition 73 into the fan chamber 92. By drawing the incoming air through the opening 88 in the outer casing 71, it is'passed over the outer surfaces of the inner casing 72, which is quite hot due to its heated inner chambers land 82. In this manner the incoming air is preheated before being passed into the fan 26. The open top 93 of the inner casing 72 is closed with a removable fiat bathe plate 94, which may be made of glass, plastic or any other suita le transparent or translucent material. This bafile plate 94 serves to deflect the heated air from the chamber 81 towards the chamber 82, where it is further heated before being discharged through the discharge outlet 67. The space around the screen or wire cage 86 in the chamber 32 is likewise filled with bulk fiber glass 87. The heater 7%) in FIGURE 4 is otherwise substantially identical to the heater 50 in FIGURE 3. "The wiring for FXGURE 4 is shown diagrammatically, and it is not believed to be necessary to show it in detail. The fan 26 and the infra-red bulbs 33 and 84- are to be connected electrically in parallel so that each will be operating at the same times.

The size and capacity of the heaters will, of course, be dependent upon the size of the housing, the number of heating units, the s ze of the fan, the density and thickloss of heat and light in passing through four inches of white or clear fiber glass positioned between the source of radiant energy and the top of the heater, as in FIG- URES l and 3. Fiber glass can be made in any number of colors, and the light emitted from a heater having colored fiber glass filters will take on the color of such filters.

. It will be appreciated that heaters using three 375 watt capacity infra-red bulbs may be used without endangering the capacities of an ordinary light outlet or a conventional light extension cord. Therefore, no heavy heating wire is required for an extension cord and no special outlet need be used. Tests have shown that two standard infra-red bulbs of 375 Watt capacity will give off more usuable heat under the conditions embodied in this type of heater than the conventional type space heaters using heating coils ,or calrod units, which require extra heavy electric cords and require 1,500 watts for eflicicnt operation.

The heat exchange units and/or filtering material obviously must be made of transparent or translucent material in order to permit the passage of and diffusion of light therethrough. Many different kinds of material now on the market have been tried, but none except fiber glass has proven efiicient. Manifestly, there may be other plastic or synthetic materials produced having all of the heat exchange and light transmitting properties desirable, which could be substituted for the present fiber glass without departing fnom the spirit or scope of the invention.

Fiber glass in bulk or in preformed bats is very inexpensive and exceedingly light-in-weight. Ithas no tendency to compact even under crushing weights, and, when the weight is removed, returns substantially to its original condition and shape. The spun fiber glass threads do not burn, but under intense heat become scorched, turning dark and sometimes have a tendency to melt within the range of heat developed by a 375-watt infra-red bulb. Therefore, it is necessary to use a ventilating fan for forcing the air through the housing at all times when the light is turned on. I

The fan should have suificient capacity to remove the absorbed heat from the fiber glass filters before it becomes scorched. A conventional ventilating fan having a capacity of moving a stream of air at the rate of three hundred feet per minute is sufficient for one 375 watt infrared bulb. Of course, fans having a higher or lower capacity might be used satisfactorily, but not efficiently.

The optimum is for the filter material to collect all of the heat being given off by the source of radiant energy, and a fancapable of removing it therefrom before it has an opportunity to build-up to: a scorching temperature therein. The thickness of the filter bats need not be limited to that shown and described, but can be varied between a thickness of not less than one inch nor more than eight inches, depending upon the velocity or capacity of the fan being used. Obviously, if too thick a filter is used, an exceedingly large fan must be installed, which would make the heater expensive and ineificient to operate. If too thin a filter were to be used, an ineflicient heatexohange and filtering action would take place, as there would not be enough build-up of heat to provide heated air having a temperature capable of comfortable heating of the room in which it is to be situated. A comfortable and elficient heating temperature is one that increases the temperature of the incoming air in the order of 125 degrees F.

It will be obvious that, if too thick at filter is used, the light from the source of radiant energy cannot be transmitted and difiused therethrough, and that, if too thin a filter were to be used, too much light would be transmitted and diffused therethrough for providing a subdued light of the type desired.

While no filters are shown in the drawings over the air inlets, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that the usable life of the transparent or translucent heat exchange and filtering units may be extended considerably if a disposable filter is mounted removably over said air inlets, whereby they may be changed easily and quickly when becoming dirty. Such filters would collect and remove most of the dust and dirt from the incoming air so that only clean filtered air will be passed through such units.

In the summer time, when filtering action and subdued light is desired but not heat, these heaters may be used efiiciently for such purposes by merely replacing the infra-red bulbs with conventional low wattage incandescent bulbs. The heat generated by such bulbs will not be noticeable.

It Will be obvious that the heaters 50 and 7t!- illustrated are portable space heaters capable of being moved as desired. However, it must be realized that similar heaters may be built into or otherwise mounted around the walls of a room in a building to provide the necessary individual heating unit or units therefor. Such a use will materially reduce the cost of equipping a building with a good heating system as compared to present day conventional central heating systems.

Although we have described in detail and illustrated in the drawings but three forms which the invention may assume, it will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art that the same need not be so limited, but that various modifications may be made therein without departing from the spirit thereof or from the scope of the appended claims.

What we claim is:

1. A combination heater and light which comprises an enclosed housing having an air intake and an air outlet, a source of radiant energy capable of producing heat and light mounted within said housing between said air intake and said air outlet, a filter of heat absorbing and light transmitting material mounted within said housing between said source of radiant energy and said air outlet capable of absorbing the heat and difiusing the light therethrough, said filter having a density and thickness capable of filtering the air passing therethrough without substantially impeding its progress while permitting a substantial amount of difiused light to pass therethrough, a light transmitting area in said housing for allowing the diffused light rays passing through said filter to pass out of said housing, and means for moving a stream of air over said source of radiant energy and through said filter to remove the absorbed heat therefrom and discharge it through said air outlet.

2. A combination heater and light which comprises an enclosed housing having an air intake and an air outlet, a source of radiant energy capable of producing heat and light mounted within said housing between said air intake and said air outlet, a filter of heat absorbing and light transmitting material mounted within said housing between said source of radiant energy and said air outlet capable of absorbing the heat and diffusing the light therethrough, said filter having a density and thickness capable of filtering the air passing therethrough without substantially impeding its progress while permitting a substantial amount of diffused light to pass therethrough, means for moving a stream of air over said source of radiant energy, a light transmitting area in said housing for allowing the diffused light rays passing through said filter to pass out of said housing, and through said filter for removing said absorbed heat for discharge through said air outlet, and means adjustably mounted above said filter for reflecting the diffused light from said filter outside of said housing and into the surrounding area.

3. A combination heater and light which comprises an enclosed housing made of translucent material having an air intake and an air outlet, at source of radiant energy capable of producing heat and light mounted within said housing between said air intake and said air outlet, at filter of heat absorbing and light transmitting material mounted Within said housing between said source of radiant energy and said air outlet capable of absorbing the heat and diifusing the light therethrough, said filter having a density and thickness capable of filtering the air passing therethrough without substantially impeding its progress while permitting a substantial amount of diffused light to pass therethrough, and means for moving a stream of air over said source of radiant energy and through said filter to remove the absorbed heat for discharge through said air outlet.

4. A combination heater and light which comprises an enclosed housing made of translucent material having an air intake and an air outlet, a source of radiant energy capable of producing heat and light mounted within said housing between said air intake and said air outlet, a heat absorbing and light transmitting filter of spun translucent fiber glass mounted within said housing between said source of radiant energy and said air outlet capable of absorbing the heat and diffusing the light therethrough, said filter having a density and thickness capable of filtering the air passing therethrough without substantially impeding its progress while permitting a substantial amount of diffused light to pass therethrough, and means including a circulating fan mounted between said air intake and said source of radiant energy for moving a stream of air over said source of radiant energy and through said filter to remove the absorbed heat for discharge through said air outlet.

5. A combination heater and light which comprises an enclosed housing having an air intake and an air outlet, a source of radiant energy capable of producing heat and light mounted within said housing between said air intake and said air outlet, a heat absorbing and light transmitting fiber glass filter mounted within said housing between said source of radiant energy and said air outlet capable of absorbing the heat and difi'using the light therethrough, said filter having a density and thickness capable of filtering the air passing therethrough Without substantially impeding its progress while permitting a substantial amount of diffused light to pass therethrough, means for moving a stream of air over said source'of radiant energy and through said filter to remove the ab sorbed heat therefrom for discharge through said air outlet, and a light transmitting area in said housing for allowing the difiused light rays passing through said filte 'to pass out of said housing. a

6. A combination heater and light which comprises an enclosed housing made of non-burning and non-scorching material having an air intake and an air outlet, a plurality of sources of radiant energy capable of producing heat and light mounted Within said housing'between said air intake and said air outlet, a filter or heat absorbing and light transmitting material mounted within said housing between each source of radiant energy and said air outlet capable of absorbing the heat and diffusing the light therethrough, said filter having a density and thickness capable of filtering the air passing therethrough without substantially impeding its progress while permitting a substantial amount of diffused light to pass therethrough, a light transmitting area in said housing for allowing the diffused light rays passing through said filter to pass out of said housing, and means for moving a stream of air over said sources of radiant energy and through said filters to remove the absorbed heat therefrom for discharge through said air outlet.

7. A combination heater and light which comprises a double walled translucent housing forming an outer chamber and an inner chamber, an air intake including the outer chamber, whereby the air entering said intake will be preheated while passing through said outer chamher and into said inner chamber, an air outlet connected with said inner chamber, said inner chamber being subdivided into a plurality of heating chambers arranged in series, each heating chamber having a source of radiant energy capable of producing heat and light, each heating chamber having a filter mounted between each source of radiant energy and its air outlet capable of absorbing the heat and diffusing the light therethrough, said filters having a density and thickness capable of filtering the air passing therethrough without substantially impeding its progress while permitting a substantial amount of diffused light to pass therethrough, and means for moving a stream of preheated air through said heating chambers and over said sources of radiant energy and through said filters to remove the absorbed heat therefrom for disand said air outlet, a heat absorbing and light transmit-ting fiber glass filter mounted within said housing between said source of radiant energy and said air outlet capable of absorbing the heat and diffusing the light therethrough, said fiber glass filter having a density and thickness capable of filtering the air passing therethrough without substantiallyimpeding its progress while at the same time permitting a substantial amount of diffused light to pass therethrough, means for moving a stream of air over said source of radiant energy and through said filter to remove the absorbed heat therefrom for discharge through said air outlet, a removable translucent bafile closing said opening in its top, and an adjustable closure mounted above said battle for reflecting the light passing through said bafile into the surrounding area.

9. A combination heater and light which comprises an enclosed housing made of a non-scorching, non-burning colored translucent material having an air intake and an air outlet, a source of radiant energy capable of producing heat and light mounted within said housing between said air intake andsaid air outlet, a filter of heat absorbing and light transmitting material mounted within said housing between said source of radiant energy and said air outlet capable of absorbing the'heat and diffusing the light therethrough, said filter having a density and thickness capable of filtering the air passing therethrough without substantially impeding its progress while permitting a substantial amount of diffused light to pass therethrough, and means for moving a stream of air over said source of radiant energy and through said filter to remove the absorbed heat therefrom for discharge through said air outlet. 7

10. A combination heater and light which comprises an enclosed housing having an opening in its top and an air intake and an air outlet, a source of radiant energy capable of producing heat and light mounted within said housing between said air inlet and said air outlet, a filter of heat absorbing and light transmitting material mounted within said housing and surrounding said source of radiant energy capable of absorbing the heat and diffusing the light therethrough, said filter having a density and thickness capable of filtering the air passing therethrough withoutsubstantially impeding its progress while permitting a substantial amount of diifused light to pass therethrough, means for moving a stream of air through said filter to remove the absorbed heat therefrom and 'discharge it through said air outlet, and a transparent bafile for closing the opening in its top to deflect the heat while permitting the difiusedrlight to pass out of said housing.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,706,846 Fisher Mar. 26, 1929 2,379,705 Graves July 3, 1945 2,527,013 Kjelgaard Oct. 24, 1950 2,938,101 Borzner May 24, 1960

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1706846 *Aug 15, 1927Mar 26, 1929Fanaire Heater CompanyHeating apparatus
US2379705 *Nov 19, 1943Jul 3, 1945Frederick GravesPortable electric heater
US2527013 *Oct 17, 1947Oct 24, 1950Kjelgaard Bayard LInfrared heater
US2938101 *Feb 7, 1958May 24, 1960Borzner Andrew CElectric space heaters
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3836750 *Feb 20, 1973Sep 17, 1974R CarusoHair dryer
US3973101 *May 31, 1974Aug 3, 1976Andre BosseElectric air heating furnace
US4003967 *Oct 31, 1974Jan 18, 1977Les Placement Courteau LimiteeElectric heating and humidifying apparatus
US4593179 *Mar 28, 1983Jun 3, 1986Georg SchulzMulti function air heater
US4900898 *Jan 20, 1988Feb 13, 1990Kling William EElectric space heater
US5345533 *Dec 20, 1991Sep 6, 1994United Optics Technology, Inc.Photoemission radiant heater
US5511145 *Nov 16, 1993Apr 23, 1996Bailey; Ralph E.Portable electric heater or floor lamp
US5963709 *May 13, 1997Oct 5, 1999Micropyretics Heaters International, Inc.Hot air blower having two porous materials and gap therebetween
US20110260031 *Nov 20, 2009Oct 27, 2011Jiri BurdaMultifunctional supply element
EP0088567A1 *Feb 28, 1983Sep 14, 1983Thomas Michael DeszbergCombined lighting and ventilation device
WO1990006707A1 *Dec 18, 1989Jun 28, 1990Dean Mabin WarwickMirror de-fogging apparatus
WO1990010830A1 *Mar 1, 1990Sep 7, 1990Soederhamn Architect AbLight fitting including filter elements
WO2011041992A1Oct 7, 2010Apr 14, 2011Potuzak IvanElectric heating unit
Classifications
U.S. Classification219/220, 219/473, 392/355, 219/553, 261/142
International ClassificationH05B3/00, F24H3/04, F21V33/00
Cooperative ClassificationF21V33/0092, H05B3/008, F24H3/0411, F21V33/0088
European ClassificationF24H3/04B2, F21V33/00F, H05B3/00L2B, F21V33/00F2