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Publication numberUS3104788 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 24, 1963
Filing dateSep 10, 1962
Publication numberUS 3104788 A, US 3104788A, US-A-3104788, US3104788 A, US3104788A
InventorsArthur B. Wood
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Beverage-cup holder
US 3104788 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 24, 1963 A. B. WOOD 3,104,788

BEVERAGE-CUP HOLDER Filed Sept. 10, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR.

Sept. 24, 1963 A. B. WOOD 3, 04,788

BEVERAGE-CUP HOLDER Filed Sept. 10, 1962 2 Sheets -Sheet 2 l -s" INVENTOR: W ARTHUR B. WOOD United States Patent 3,104,788 BEVERAGE-CUP HOLDER Arthur B. Wood, Arlington Heights, Ill., assignor to Admart, Inc., Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois Filed Sept. 10, 1962, er. No. 222,499 10 Claims. (Ql. 22445) This invention relates to a holder for use in carrying a pair of beverage containers.

One of the problems constantly experienced in serving patrons of drive-in refreshment stands in the handling of the beverages in paper cups or the like. Usually when multiple cups of beverage (coffee, milk, shakes, ice cream cup cones, etc.) are ordered by one person to satisfy the drink orders of several persons in the automobile, he must make two or more trips, carrying a cup in each hand. Sometimes these establishments furnish one-time use trays on which the cups are to be transported. Almost always this type transport of multiple cups of beverage from the dispensing counter results in spillage and overturned cups of beverage, before it gets into the hands of the patron. This is the type of problem sought to be overcome by this invention.

The main objects of this invention are to provide an improved form of holder for the transport of multiple of pairs of beverage cups to the patrons of drive-in refreshment stands or the like; to provide an improved, preformed, flexible templet readily arrangeable into tapered cylindrical form to have beverage cups telescopically seated therein; to provide an improved templet-type strip of this kind having transversely insertable parts for securing the strip in cup holding form; to provide an improved templet-type strip of this kind wherein the transversely inserta'ble parts afford an opening for the insertion of a finger to retaain the strip in cup-holding form for the ready transport to a spot remote from point of the dispension; to provide a templet-type strip of this kind incorporating means for preventing the cup from dropping through the holder; and to provide a templettype cup-holder strip of this kind of such simple construction as to make its manufacture extremely inexpensive and its use exceptionally facile.

One specific embodiment is shown in the accompanying drawings, in which;

FIGURE 1 is a face view of a templet-type strip constructed in accordance with this invention;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view illustrating the manner of placing the strip in operative form;

FIG. 3 is a view showing two cups in place in the formed strip and held by the index finger of a person handling the beverages;

FIG. 4 is a vertical sectional view taken on the plane of the line 4-4 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a vertical sectional view taken on the plane of the line 55 of FIG. 3; and

FIG. 6 is a top plan view of -a pair of the units side by side illustrating the ease of carrying two pairs of cups using only the index finger to transport the same.

The essential concept of this invention involves an arcuate-shaped, templet-type strip of flexible material having end projections which, by flexing the strip, are insertable through a transverse median opening in the strip for gripping by the fingers and converting the intermediate portions of the strip into a pair of juxtaposed frusto-conical-shaped cylinders for the telescopic reception of cups to permit the facile transport of beverages from a point of dispension to a point of consumption.

An on-the-spot, beverage-cup, forming holder embodying the foregoing concept comprises a strip 6 having outwardly-extending projections 7 and 8 insertable through a median opening 9, for gripping preferably by the index 3-,1MJ88 Patented Sept. 24, 1963 ice finger of one hand, to dispose the intermediate portions 10 and 11 of the strip 6 into a pair of pockets 12 and 13 for seating cups 14.

The strip 6 is die cut from conventional, paper-card material or, if desired, formed of suitable plastic. The material should be fairly stable and of such resilient flexibility and thickness as to tend to the formation of substantially fully-rounded pockets 12 and 13 when the strip 6 is to be put to use. Preferably, the strip 6 is of arcuate contour as shown in FIG. 1, with :a width of between 4" to 4 /2" with the inner perimeter 16 subtended by a cord of approximately 13 long and with the outerperimeter 17 subtended by a cord of approximately 17" long. The cup holder formed by these approximate dimensions will serve to hold almost all sizes of beverage cups now used in drive-in refreshment stands. However, it should be observed that should cups of extreme small or large size be used the fore-going dimensions will vary accordingly. Transversely of the strip are radially-disposed score lines 18 substantially joining the ends of the arcuateshaped perimeters 16 and 17.

The finger-grip extensions 7 and 8, each approximately 3" in length from the respective scores 18 and tapered outwardly, are somewhat rounded at the ends to approximately 2" width. The opposite edges of these extensions 7 and 8 are formed with a series of serrations 19 which coact to retain the extensions in cup-pocket forming positions, as will be explained presently. The extensions 7 and 8 are each slit as at 28 and are provided with a cutout 29 so as to provide the narrow tabs 21.

The intermediate portions 10 and 11 of the strip 6 have short, narrow arcuate-shaped sections 22 formed along the inner perimeter by the arcuate-shaped slits 23 and the radial scores 24, 25 and 26. These sections may be deflected inwardly into the pockets 12 and 13 for the cups to rest upon, as will be explained presently. As shown in FIG. 1, portions 20 of the strip 6, along the slits 23 and inwardly of the respective scores 24 and 25, may be cut out and in this case the bottom rim of the cup will seat on the edges 3%.

The transverse median opening 9 here is shown as an irregularly-shaped opening with oppositely-extending narrow radial slots 27. Although the opening'may be a convenience in providing easy entrance for the extensions 7 and '8 therethrough and creating finger gripping extensions. Such an opening is not altogether imperative since mere continuing of the slots 26 across the strip 6 will sufiice.

Such a pre-forrned, templet-type strip 6 is converted into an on-the-spot cup holder in the following manner:

The strip 6 first is flexed into somewhat annular shape as the extensions '8 and 9 are shifted inwardly into overlapping, rabutting position extending inwardly of this tentative annular form. Thereupon the abutting extensions 7 and 8 are projected through the opening -9 and gripped between the thumb and one or more fingers. Such projection of the extensions 7 and 8 through the opening 9 will tend to seat certain of the serrations 19 over these edges of the strip 6 defining the slots 27. Thereupon, the strip 6 will have been converted quickly into two frustoconical pockets '12 and 13, ready for the insertion of cups 14 (see FIGS. 2 and 4). The extent to which the extensions 7 and 8 are pulled through the slots 26 depends upon the size of the cups 14 with which such a cup-holder is to be used in serving beverages.

Having thus drawn the extensions 7 and 8 through the opening '9, the desired distance, the tabs 21 are pressed outwardly in one direction and turned outwardly away from the pockets to permit the insertion of a finger in the opening 31 caused by the pushing out of the tabs 21. The abutting extensions '7 and 8, with the folded back tabs 21 are gripped by inserting the index finger through the openi) ing 29 and the additional opening 31 formed by the folded tabs 21 for secure gripping of the holder as, with the other hand, cups 14 are placed in the pockets l2 and '13, as clearly shown in FIGS. 3 and 5.

The cups '14, for use with which this on-the-spot formed holder was designed for use, primarily are the conventional and extensively used tapered paper or plastic cups. As noted above, the conversion of the strip 6 in the twocup pockets 1 2 and 13 is readily accommodated to the vari-size of the cups that are presently used at drive-in refreshment stands.

In other situations, such as for home, church or club affairs, these on-the-spot formable cup holders can be used with the conventional glasses, if desired, since the pockets, being tapered as well as the sections 22 will prevent the glass from falling through the pockets 12-13. Soft ice cream stores also may use the device of this invention efficaciously since the cones are of cup-shape. Furthermore, as illustrated in FIG. 6, two devices of the present invention may be carried by the index finger hence four cups of beverage may be transported by using the index finger of one hand. This may be doubled by using the index finger of the other hand.

The sections 22 have been provided for use, when needed, to provide a rest for the bottom of a cup 14 to ensure against any possibility of the cup dropping through the pocket. .To that end a slight inward pressure on the extension 22 will dispose it inwardly as shown in FIG. 5. It should now be obvious that because of the flexibility of adjustment and the tapering inner side walls of the pockets 12-13 two different sizes of frusto-conical shaped cups may likewise be simultaneously carried by product of the invention.

It should also be obvious that the strip 6 provides an ideal place for advertisements, etc.

Upon removal of the cups 1 4 from the pockets 1?. and '13, a release of the extensions '7 and 8 generally will cause the strip 6 to tend to resume its unfolded, fiat position. Thereupon the strip 6 may be discarded or it may be used again, if desired.

Although but one specific embodiment of this invention is herein shown and described it will be understood that details of the construction shown may be altered or omitted without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined by the following claims.

I claim:

1. An article of manufacture comprising a narrow strip of flexible material having a. a transverse median opening therein, and

b. an integral extension on each end,

c. the strip flexible to bring the extensions into reverse abutting position for insertion through the transverse opening to be gripped by the hand and thereby convert the strip into two juxtaposed hollow cylindrical pockets for the telescopic seating of a cup in each pocket.

2. An article of manufacture as set forth in claim 1 wherein the extension has one edge serrated to anchor the edge of the strip when the extension is inserted through the opening.

3. An article of manufacture as set forth in claim 1 wherein the strip is of arcuate contour so that the hollow cylindrical pockets are of frusto-conical form.

4. An article of manufacture as set forth in claim 1 wherein narrow sections of the strip along one edge are Severed and scored to permit the depression of the sections inwardly after forming the pockets to position support for the basis of the inserted cups. *5. An article of manufacture as set forth in claim 1 wherein the extensions have narrow tabs foldable over on one of the extensions after insertion through the opening.

pockets for the telescopic seating of a cupi in each pocket. 7. An article of manufacture as set forth in claim 6 wherein the extensions have the opposite edges serrated to sit over the edges of the strip when the extensions are inserted through the transverse opening.

8. An article of manufacture as set forth in claim 6 wherein the extensions have tabs for folding over onto one of the extensions after insertion through the opening and thereby hold the extensions in face-to-face contact.

9. An article of manufacture as set forth in claim 6 wherein narrow sections along the inner perimeter of the strip intermediate the transverse opening and the extension are severed and scored to permit the depression of the sections inwardlyafter forming the pockets to position supports for the bases of the inserted cups.

10. An article of manufacture comprising a narrow strip of flexible material having a. the opposite perimeters of concentric arcuate contour, b. a transverse median opening therein, c. an integral extension on each end of the strip outwardly tapered and serrated along the opposite edges thereof, d. tabs formed in each extension, and e. narrow sections along the inner perimeter of the strip severed and scored, f. the strip flexible to bring the extensions into abutting position for insertion through the transverse opening with the tabs folded over onto one extension to be gripped by the hand and thereby convert the strip into two juxtaposed i hollow frusto-conical shaped pockets for the telescopic seating of a cup in each pocket with the bottom thereof resting on the respective inwardly-depressed narrow section.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Germany A g. .26, 19.54

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1795615 *Nov 7, 1929Mar 10, 1931Parran Alice NPaper cup or cup-holder handle
US2154195 *Dec 11, 1937Apr 11, 1939Leon BenoitFiller package
US3069538 *Jul 17, 1959Dec 18, 1962Harry E HobsonHeadlight
DE917217C *Sep 26, 1950Aug 26, 1954Richard SchwarzBaum- und Rutenbinder
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3353729 *May 15, 1967Nov 21, 1967Hull Robert SHolder for beverage can
US3402910 *Sep 29, 1966Sep 24, 1968Creative Packaging IncDisposable bottle holder
US3709545 *Jan 6, 1971Jan 9, 1973Oltmanns GContainer carrier
US4230235 *Apr 20, 1979Oct 28, 1980Amico Paul E DiBeverage can handle
US4491220 *Mar 2, 1984Jan 1, 1985Daviss Gilbert PContainer for holding popcorn and a drink cup
US4491356 *Sep 30, 1982Jan 1, 1985Container Corporation Of AmericaSleeve style package holder
US4678154 *Apr 25, 1986Jul 7, 1987Mcfarland Joseph RHolder for beverage containers and the like
US4685583 *May 16, 1986Aug 11, 1987Noon Kelly DDisposable beverage cup handle
US5203490 *Jun 25, 1992Apr 20, 1993Roe Mark EHot cup with heat-insulating hand-grip
US5238161 *Nov 26, 1991Aug 24, 1993Takiko KimishimaDevice for holding a glass
US5273334 *May 5, 1992Dec 28, 1993Schopfer E KevinGarment carrier
US5613720 *Nov 8, 1995Mar 25, 1997Shaddy; Joseph G.Cup holder
US5655805 *Jul 10, 1996Aug 12, 1997Shaddy; Joseph G.Cup holder
US5797640 *Apr 29, 1997Aug 25, 1998Schopfer; E. KevinGarment carrier
US8210392 *Jul 30, 2009Jul 3, 2012Ryan KangBeverage cup sleeve with integrated fold-out handles
US20050241964 *Apr 12, 2005Nov 3, 2005Taylor Clare LConfigurable cup holder
US20090242717 *Mar 25, 2008Oct 1, 2009Burrows Paper CorporationCup Holder
US20100213205 *Jul 30, 2009Aug 26, 2010Ryan KangBeverage cup sleeve with integrated fold-out handles
USD744779 *Oct 22, 2014Dec 8, 2015Michael Joseph BollandBeverage container
WO2001066435A1 *Mar 7, 2001Sep 13, 2001Taylor Clare LouiseConfigurable cup holder
WO2003011085A1 *Aug 1, 2002Feb 13, 2003Mark Breeze-StringfellowImprovements in holders for beverage containers
Classifications
U.S. Classification294/152, D07/622, 294/159, D07/513, 211/74, 294/31.2, 294/87.1, 294/165
International ClassificationA47G23/00, A47G23/02
Cooperative ClassificationA47G23/0208
European ClassificationA47G23/02A