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Publication numberUS3105970 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 8, 1963
Filing dateMar 27, 1961
Priority dateMar 27, 1961
Publication numberUS 3105970 A, US 3105970A, US-A-3105970, US3105970 A, US3105970A
InventorsCecile Herzberg
Original AssigneeCecile Herzberg
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Scarf
US 3105970 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 8, 1963 c. HERZBERG 3,105,970

LscARF Filed March 27, 1961 y 2f sheets-sheet 1 INVENToR. Cecile Herzberg www AT TORNEY v C. HERZBEIRG oct. s, 1963 A SCARF 2 Sheets-Sheet 2' Filed March 27, 1961 INVENToR. Cecile Herzberg BY .//vwf ATTORNEY United States Patent O 3,165,9'7 SCARF Cecile Herzberg, 165 West End Ave., New York 25, N.Y. Filed Mar. 27, 1961, Ser. No. 98,455 3 Claims. (Cl. 2-91) 'I'he present invention relates to a scarf and more particularly to a scarf adaptedautomatically to drape in interesting folds.

A scarf is a popular item of apparel for practical and aesthetic reasons. A scarf provides warmth to .the area of the neck and, attractively designed, enhances 4the costume ensemble. Unfortunately, the average rectangular, square, or triangular scarves do not hang correctly when tied about the neck and require considerable manipulation and pinning to stay in place and look attractive.

It is, therefore, an lobject of the present invention to provide a scarf which will overcome the foregoing shortcoming.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a scarf which may be reversible to add variety.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a scarf which is economical to manufacture and lends itself to variations in styling.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide a scarf which may be made from a wide variety of fabrics.

Additional objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following description and drawings, in which:

FIG. l is a plan view of the scarf of the present invention;

FIG. 2 -is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 2--2 of FIG. l;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of a neckband extension with a slideable ring;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of a neckband extension showing one method of preventing stretching;

FIG. 5 is a plan view of a neckband extension showing an alternate method of preventing stretching;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 6 6 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a view of an embellished scarf when worn by a person;

FIG. 8 is a view of an unadorned scarf when worn by a person;

FIG. 9 is a plan view of the back of a scarf according to another embodiment; and

FIG. 10 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 10-10 of FIG. 9.

Referring now to the drawings, FIGS. 1 and 2 show the scarf with a body portion 10 of generally triangular shape. At each of its upper corners there is a neckband extension 12 extending in an upward and outward direction from the body portion 10. The scarf may be made of single or double-ply unitary pieces of material but it has been found that the scarf has better draping characteristics when it is constructed with three layers of material as shown in the drawings. There is an outer face 14, an inner face, or lining, 16, and an interlining 18. Each of the faces 14 and 16 may be made of a different material so that the scarf is reversible. 'Ihe scarf can be made in any variety lof fabrics, such as chiffon or velvet for dressy occasions, knitted fabrics for warmth, terry cloth for athletics, or fur for a luxurious touch.

-All plies of the scarf are cu-t on the straight of the material as indicated by the cross-hatched lines. lIt will be seen, however, that the material is on the bias in the neckband extensions 12. This construction causes the scarf to drape automatically and attractively upon put- ICC ting it on- Because the neckband extensions 12 are arranged on the bias Kof the material, some -materials may tend .to stretch in the said extensions. To avoid such stretching, a tape 20 may be sewn into the seam of the extensions at the-time the'plies of fabric are stitched t0- gether (FIG. 4).. Adding the tape Ztl is effective with the lightweight vfabrics such as chiffon and with the stretchable fabrics such as wool. With fabrics, such as satin, which do not stretch Very much, an alternate method may be used to prevent stretching; a piece of fabric 22, cambric for example, is sewn across the extension 12 as shown -in FIG. 5.

To use the scarf it is merely placed about the neck, as t shown in FIG. `8, and secured at the back by anysuitable attachment means, such as snaps 24. It may be desired to provide several rows of snaps .to permit the scarf to be worn higher or lower on the neck as desired. The scarf automatically drapes itself becomingly when placed about the neck of the wearer yet it lies llat for wrinklefree packing and storage.

A slideable ring 26 may be placed on each neckband extension 12 to incorporate folds of adjustable closeness. The ring 26 may be made of the same material as the outer face "14.

FIG. 9 shows another embodiment of the present invention in which a secret pocket is incorporated with the scarf. In this embodiment, the scarf is made yof four plies as shown in FIG. 10 and access to the pocket is gained through a zipper 28 which extends vertical-ly in the approximate center of the scarf. Positioning the zipper -28 in this manner prevents interfering with the `drape of the scarf. A secret pocket, of course, is very handy for hiding objects of light weight, such as money, or a ring.

If desired, the scarf may be made more decorative by embellishing it with embroidery, applique, sequins, of costume pins which may be added, both for decoration or to create an additional interesting fold. FIG. 7 shows a bow of sequins which is appliqued over a fold for further decoration. Needless to say, a simple, unadorned fabric may be used, with or without a design.l

'Ihe scarf, which is the subject ofthe present invention is thus extremely simple in construction yet provides a most attractive costume accessory. The scarf may be made to be as unadorned or as ornate as desired to complement any costume. It is economical to produce because it luses a minimum of material which permits utilization of small ends of material. In addition, the scarf may be easily rolled and carried by an individual to take out and wear when desired.

While specic embodiments of the invention have been shown and described in detail yto illustrate the application of the invention, it Ywill be understood that the invention may be embodied otherwise `without departing from such principles.

What is claimed is:

l. A scar-f comprising at least a single piece of material comprising a body portion of generally triangular shape having 'a substantially horizontal top edge with neckband extensions extending diVergin-gly and upwardly from the end portions of the top edge whereby they are spaced `apart and separated by the said horizontal top edge of the body portion, and side edges extending convergingly and downwardly from the top edge end portions in substantially parallel alignment with said extensions, said material being cut to have the body portion on the straight of the material and the neckband extensions on the bias thereby to produce 4interesting folds when the scarf is worn about the neck. i

2. A scar-f comprising at least a single piece of material comprising a body portion of -generally triangular shape having a substantially horizontal top edge with neckband extensionsextending divergingly and upwardly from the end portions of -the top ed-ge whereby they are spaced apart and separated by lthe said horizontal top edge of the body portion, and side edges extending convergingly and downwardly from the top edge end portions in substantially parallel alignment with said extentensions, rmeans on said extensions to prevent stretching thereof, said material ybeing out to have the body portion on the straight yof the material and the neokband extensions on the bias thereby to produce interesting folds when the scarf is Worn about the neck.

3. A reversible scarf comprising lthree layers of material secured together to form an outer face, an inner face and an interlining, each of said layers being a single piece of material, said scarf comprising a body portion of gener-ally triangular shape having a substantially horiizontal top edge with neckband extensions extending dil vergingly and upwardly from the end portions of the top edge whereby they `are spaced apart and separated by the said horizontal top edge of the body portion, and side edges extending convergingly and downwardly from the top edge end portions in substantially parallel alignment with said extensions, said material being cut to have the body por-tion on the straight of the material and the neckband extensions on the bias thereby to produce interesting folds when the scanf is Iworn about the neck, and a tape secured within the layers of the neekband extension to prevent stretching thereof, v

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATESPATENTS Wittl June 18, Kiraly Nov. 13, Troost Jan. 10, Brown Feb. 21, Horneyer Aug. 15, Wolfe July 2, Green et al. July 4, Pesavento Aug. 22,I Bachrach Nov. 21, Nitzberg Aug. 12, Tomarkin June 17, Fraum Dec. 9, McMahon Sept. 29, Swartz Mar. 22, Sullivan July 25,

FOREIGN PATENTS Australia Feb. 23, Belgium Nov. 30, France Aug. 29', France June 24, Great Britain of Great Britain Apr. 27, Switzerland Aug. 2,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US779510 *May 21, 1904Jan 10, 1905George S TroostMuffler.
US783173 *Feb 11, 1904Feb 21, 1905Berry A BrownCombined chest and throat protector.
US797434 *Apr 4, 1905Aug 15, 1905Arthur HomeyerLaunderable bib.
US1031307 *Sep 11, 1911Jul 2, 1912Laura J WolfeAdjustable veil.
US1916507 *Sep 26, 1932Jul 4, 1933Green Jacob MScarf
US1923999 *Nov 23, 1932Aug 22, 1933Ferdinando PesaventoNecktie holder
US1936045 *May 10, 1933Nov 21, 1933Bachrach Arthur NScarf
US2425635 *Oct 16, 1946Aug 12, 1947Morris NitzbergDress
US2600814 *Dec 24, 1949Jun 17, 1952Wanda TomarkinScarf
US2620478 *May 14, 1949Dec 9, 1952Marks Fraum MillyAscot, scarf, or the like
US2653324 *Mar 23, 1951Sep 29, 1953Mcmahon Lorette CBaby bib
US2704368 *Jun 18, 1952Mar 22, 1955Sophia SwartzScarves
US2993211 *Sep 12, 1958Jul 25, 1961Sullivan Carol BCombined scarf and head covering
USD121135 *Apr 15, 1939Jun 18, 1940 Design for a scarf
USD179199 *Jul 13, 1956Nov 13, 1956 Necktie
AU173932A * Title not available
BE499206A * Title not available
CH226911A * Title not available
FR562208A * Title not available
FR786993A * Title not available
GB191118673A * Title not available
GB191404442A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4138744 *Nov 4, 1977Feb 13, 1979Pitzel Michael AReversible, multi purpose, multi stylable structure
US4199822 *Sep 20, 1978Apr 29, 1980Free Form, Inc.Blouse
US4718123 *May 6, 1986Jan 12, 1988Chrissellene PetropoulosCold climate protective garment
US4980927 *Dec 16, 1988Jan 1, 1991Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyAdherent protective collars
US5025508 *Dec 18, 1989Jun 25, 1991Duncan Patty SScarf construction
US5058211 *Oct 22, 1990Oct 22, 1991Hanks Darrell LBandanna-type article of wearing apparel
US5465689 *Dec 9, 1994Nov 14, 1995Winder; ForrestFlea and tick repellent bandanna for pets
US5906006 *Jun 11, 1998May 25, 1999Castro, Jr.; FelixAdjustable bandana-type headwear
US6016573 *Jul 17, 1998Jan 25, 2000Olson; Mary LouPet scarf with pouch
US6282722 *Oct 27, 1998Sep 4, 2001Jane Christine PogacharProtective leather, or like material, face and neck bandana with interchangeable, two-ply flannel, or like material, liner attached with snap pressure closures
US7013494 *Feb 4, 2004Mar 21, 2006Warren WilkinsHandkerchief with pouch
US7275269 *Oct 14, 2003Oct 2, 2007Skillman Heidi AWarming scarf
US7350241 *Apr 19, 2004Apr 1, 2008Gendall Alex KQuick adjustment bandana device
US7427417Mar 17, 2005Sep 23, 2008Sequim Lavender Company, Llcvapor permeable multilayer bags containing odors, used to dispense vapors to human or animal respiratory systems
US7636953 *Jun 1, 2007Dec 29, 2009Gary GreyHair wrap with different sidedness
WO2005104890A2 *Apr 12, 2005Nov 10, 2005Gendall Alex KQuick adjustment bandana device
WO2007022148A2 *Aug 15, 2006Feb 22, 2007Bernt KuhlmannWearing apparel with pocket
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/91, D02/500, 2/207
International ClassificationA41D23/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41D23/00
European ClassificationA41D23/00