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Publication numberUS3106033 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 8, 1963
Filing dateJun 12, 1961
Priority dateNov 20, 1958
Publication numberUS 3106033 A, US 3106033A, US-A-3106033, US3106033 A, US3106033A
InventorsBrewer Margaret W
Original AssigneeSavage Arms Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Firing mechanism with sear safety indicator
US 3106033 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 8, 1963 N. BREWER 3,106,033

FIRING MECHANISM WITH SEAR SAFETY INDICATOR Original Filed Nov. 20, 1958 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 :flg. 1- 4 III 2.1

'6 as /33 BN0 2 f 3d. mijliiml?"" IE-M INVENTOR NICHOLAS L- BREWER DECEASED BY H0 MARGARET W. BREWER EX LC UTRIX BY 4'7Z2d ATTORNEY Oct. 8, 1963 N. 1.. BREWER FIRING MECHANISM WITH SEAR SAFETY INDICATOR Original Filed Nov. 20, 1958 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 m mx Wm NW E EC- RT V? 5U ma Wm y wr. M mam W O A G HER w 5 N DM ATTORNEY Oct. 8, 1963 N. L. BREWER 3,106,033

FIRING MECHANISM WITH SEAR SAFETY INDICATOR Original Filed Nov. 20, 1958 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR NICHOLAS L- BREWER DECEASED BY MARGARET w. BREWER Z03 EXLCUTRIX BY fwq fl we ATTORNEY ilnited States Fatent The present invention relates to improvements in small arms, such as rifles or the like, and in certain aspects finds particular utility in bolt action rifles.

This is a divisional application of applicants copending application Serial No. 775,143, filed November 20, 1958, now Patent No. 3,005,279 and assigned to Savage Arms Corporation.

The principal object of this invention is to provide improved firing mechanism for bolt action rifles.

These and related objects of the invention including the novel features by which such ends are obtained will be apparent from the following description of the disclosure found in the accompanying drawings and the particular novelty thereof pointed out in the appended claims.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a side elevation of a receiver and associated parts embodying the present invention with certain portions thereof broken away and with the action closed;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the elements seen in FIG. 1 with the action open;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary section taken on line IIIIII of FIG. 1, with the bolt removed from the receiver and with the shells removed from the magazine;

FIG. 4 is an exploded perspective view, on an enlarged scale, of the magazine and ejector assembly seen in FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a partially exploded perspective view on an enlarged scale and with portions in section, of the bolt seen in FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a section taken on line VI-VI in FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view on a different angle showing the front end of the bolt seen in FIG. 5 and illustrating its relation to the receiver which is shown partially in section and with its extractor in exploded relation;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view, with certain parts removed, showing a different angle of the rear end of the bolt seen in FIG. 5;

FIG. 9 is a longitudinal section showing the front end of the bolt as it would be locked up in the breech preparatory to firing the illustrated cartridge;

FIG. 10 is a plan view of certain component parts seen in FIG. 5;

FIG. 11 is a section taken on line XI-Xl in FIG. 5;

FIG. 12 is an elevation on an enlarged scale and with certain portions being shown in longitudinal section, of the firing mechanism indicated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 13 is a section taken on line XIII--XIII in FIG. 12;

FIG. 14 is a perspective view of the mechanism seen in FIG. 12 detached from the receiver;

FIG. 15 is a perspective view on a different angle of the mechanism shown in FIG. 12 showing an operative relationship with the bolt; and

FIG. 16 is a section taken on line XVI-XVI in FIG. 12 showing only the receiver and its tang.

The present invention includes certain aspects which are related to bolt action rifles as well as other novel features having broader utility in the field of small arms as will be apparent to those skilled in the art. FIGS. 1 and 2 illustrate the relationship of the various components of a bolt action rifle embodying these inventive features.

Thus a rifle stock 20 is grooved to receive the lower portion of a receiver 22 and secured thereto by screws 24, 26 threaded into the receiver. The rifle barrel briefly indicated at 28 is threaded onto the forward end of the rec iver with a lock nut 30 clamping a recoil plate 32 against the front face of the receiver 22. The recoil plate 32 may be received in a transverse slot formed in the rifle stock 20 so that, if desired, the barrel 28 may be otherwise dissociated from the rifle stock to give a free floating barrel mounting yielding greater accuracy.

A bolt 34 is slidably and ro-tatably mounted in the receiver 22 and may be operated by a handle 36 to carry out the functions normally associated with bolt action rifles. Thus the handle 36 may be raised from the position seen in FIG. 1 to rotate the bolt 34, and cook the firing pin. It may then be retracted (FIG. 2) to withdraw an expended cartridge shell from the firing chamber to automatically eject the shell and then moved forwardly to feed a fresh cartridge from a magazine 38 into the chamber. When the handle 36 is again moved to its lower position, the bolt is locked in the breech of the rifle with the firing pin cocked in position to be released by the trigger 40. The above brief description is provided primarily to give an over-all picture of the rifle in which the present invention is embodied and the various components thereof, as well as its detailed mode of operation, will now be described in detail.

The bolt 34 best seen in FIGS. 5 through 10, and particularly in FIG. 5, comprises an elongated tubular body 42. The bolt handle 36 is provided with a hub 44 (FIGS. 5 and 8) having an inturned flange 45 which seats on the rear end of the tubular body 42. The hub 44 is slotted at 46 to receive diametrically opposed projections 48 extending from the rear end of the tubular body 42, thereby angularly positioning the handle 36 with respect to the tubular body 42. A screw 50 is threaded into the rear end of the tubular body 42 to secure the handle 36 in place. Ball detents 51 (FIG. 10) engage grooves 53 in the hub 44 (FIG. 8) to prevent loosening of the screw 50 when the rifle is in use and yet permit easy manual disassemlbly of the screw 50 without the need for special hand tools.

A bolt head 52 is disposed at the front end of the tubular body 42 and has a reduced diameter 54 (FIGS. 5 and 6) telescopically received within the front end of the tubular body 42. The bolt head 52 is :angu-larly positioned by a projection 56 struck from the upper surface of the body 42 (FIG. 6) and received by a notch formed on the inner end of the reduced diameter 54. A locking pin or cross pin 58 secures the bolt head in place on the front end of the body 42. It will be seen that oppositely extending lock lugs 60 project from the fore portion of the bolt head 52. A front baflle 62 is rotatably' mounted on the reduced diameter 54 between the front end of the body 42 and the "lock lugs 60 and further has oppositely extending baflie lugs 64 projecting therefrom, the batfle lugs 64 having the same general cross section as the lock lugs 60. It will also be noted that a spring friction washer 66 (FIG. 9) is disposed between the front bafile 62 and the bolt head 52 to urge the latter forwardly and thereby ,maintain the pin 58 in place and also to prevent the free relative rotation between the lugs 64 and the lugs 60, that is, the lugs 64 will be held from turning out of line with lugs 60 by themselves when outside the receiver.

The bolt 34, as thus far described, is slidingly received within a bore 68 (FIG. 3) extending lengthwise of the receiver 22, while horizontally disposed channels 70, opening outwardly of the bore 68, slidingly receive the lugs 64 and 66. The channels 70 terminate (FIG. 7)

at the forwardrn'ost position of the lock lugs 61 and the front end of the receiver is connterbored to form locking shoulders 72 (FIG. 7) which are angularly disposed to the channels 70. With this arrangement the bolt 34 is locked in the breech by moving the bolt to its forwardmost position and then rotating the handle 36 from upper position to its lower position and thus bringing the lock lugs 60 into engagement with the shoulders 72, thereby locking the bolt. It will also be noted that when the bolt is so rotated the bafile lugs 64 are captured in the channels 70 and their position relative to the re-' ceiver remains unchanged. This relationship of lugs 60 and 64 also involves the bafliing of gases as in the event of a ruptured cartridge, all as will be later dealt with in greater detail.

After firing a shell, the bolt handle is raised to return the locking lugs 60 into alignment [with channels 7% preparatory to retracting the bolt and extracting the expended cartridge casing from the firing chamber. The relationship of the bolt head to the cartridge casing is best appreciated from FIG. 9 wherein it will be seen that the forward end face of the bolt head is counterbored at 73 to receive the grooved end of the cartridge case c. An extractor 74 is mounted on the forward end of the bolt head 52 and includes a lip or book 76 (see also FIG. 7) which engages the conventional groove formed in the grooved end of the casing c. More particularly, the extractor comprises a split spring band or clip having a relatively thin annular section '78 (FIG. 7) with grooved retaining lugs 80 at either extremity, the hook 76 extending from one of the retaining lugs 80. The forward end of the bolt head is relieved at 81 (FIG. 7) to receive the annular extractor section 78 with grooves 32 (FIGS. 7 and 9) being provided to receive the rear portions of the retaining lugs 80, thereby positively positioning the extractor 74 relative to the bolt head 52 in an axial. sense. This mounting arrangement further permits the spring band to be expanded as the retaining lugs 80 are snapped into notches 33 in the front face of the bolt head 52 with the lip or hook'76 projecting into the counterbore 73. The extractor 74 thus yieldingly hooks the rear end of a cartridge casing and is free to be deflected when the end of a cartridge case is-inserted or ejected from the counterbor'e 73. It will be appreciated that the extractor is simple to manufacture, requires a very minimum of space and may be easily removed simply by springing one or the other of the retaining lugs 80 out of the notch or recess 83 formed in the end of the bolt head.

The extractor 74 thus releasably grips the cartridge by the hook 76 and after firing, the bolt handle is rotated to its upper position preparatory to withdrawing and ejecting the casing. On firing the cartridge the casing will expand in the chamber and cam means are provided for positively camming the bolt rearwardly to initially free the casing from the chamber. These means comprise a member 84 rotatably and slidably mounted on t the bolt body 42 between the bolt handle hub 44 and the rear end of the receiver 22 (FIGS. 1 and 8). Member 84 also serves as a rear gas bafiie, as is later explained, and further includes a cam face 86 which is engaged by a projection 88 extending from the handle hub 44. In the last part of the upward movement of the bolt handle 36 the projection 88 engages the cam surface 86 and positively displaces the bolt 34 rearwardly thereby drawing with it the expended cartridge casing which is gripped by the lip or hook 76. t will be noted the extractor 74 is in the counterbore end of the barrel at this point and is thereby prevented from expanding as the casing is forcibly removed by this carnming action. then be fully retracted and the shell casing carried rear- Wardly to the ejector mechanism for automatically kick ing the expended shell casing from the receiver.

Reverting back to member 84, it will be seen that it is somewhat greater than semi-circular in cross section The bolt may 4 with its lower ends resting upon shoulders 91? (FIG. 1) formed adjacent the rear end of the receiver 22. The member 84 is normally maintained in a given angular relationship with the bolt body 42 by means of a spring pressed ball detent 92 (FIG. 5) riding in a longitudinal groove 94 formed in the tubular body 42. This detent arrangement permits the bolt body to be rotated relative to the member 34 when the bolt handle 36 is moved to its lower position to lock the bolt in the breech of the rifle.

Referring next to FIG. 6, it will be seen that a tapered slot 96 is cut in the lower front end of the bolt head 52 and enters the bottom of the counterbore 73. Upon retraction of the bolt 34, the slot $6 is in aligned relation with a stamped sheet metal ejector 98 (FIGS. 1 and 3) which is spring urged upwardly. As the bolt nears full retraction, the ejector 98 enters slot or groove 96 and the rear end of the casing will forcibly strike the forward face of the ejector 98 thereby kicking the casing out through an ejection port or cut-aaway 100 intermediate the ends of the receiver. It will be noted that the lip 76 (FIG. 7) is generally aligned with the port 100 so that as the rear end of the casing strikes the ejector 93 it will be thrown laterally through the port 1 30 in a low arc.

The ejector 98 is disposed towards the rear of a bottom or lower opening 102 formed in the receiver 22 and is provided with an integral depending tail 104 which is guidingly received by a slot 106 formed in an ejector housing 108 (see also FIG. 4). The upper end of the ejector 93 slidingly engages the rear wall of a magazine box 110 and the rear wall of the receiver opening 102. A spring 112' is captured between the bottom wall of housing 168 and a projection 114 extending rearwardly of the extractor 98. This arrangement provides for vertical reciprocating movement of the ejector 93 allowing it to move upwardly into the slot 96 of the bolt head 52 upon retraction of the bolt and to thereby eject the expended casing. The extractor is thereafter cammed downwardly as the bolt is again moved forwardly to feed another shell from magazine 38 into the firing chamber.

Referring now to the magazine '38 it will be seen that it comprises the magazine box 110 which is a sheet metal stamping bent into a rectangular configuration with the ends of the stamping meeting in abutting relation along a vertical line intermediate the width of the rear Wall of the magazine box as is best seen in FIG. 4. A pair of tabs or lips 116 project outwardly from the rear Wall of the magazine box and receive a downbent tab 118 extending from the ejector housing 108. The rear wall of the magazine box is also slotted at 120 to receive projections 122 extending'from the walls of housing 108 to prevent the rear Wall of the magazine 110' from spreading. It will also be noted that a lip 124 projects forwardly from the front wall of box 110 and lips 126 project rearwardly from the rear wall of the box. The lips 126 are spaced apart to permit passage of the ejector 98 therebetween and further guide said ejector. The lips 124, 126 are both spaced below the upper side edges 128 of said'box, so that box 110 may preferably be mounted on receiver 22 by forming ledges 130 (FIGS. 1 and 3) longitudinally of the bottom opening 102 and opposedhorizontal slots 132, 134 spaced downwardly from the ledges 130 at the forward and rear ends of the opening 102. With this arrangement, the magazine box 110 may be assembled on the receiver 22 by inserting the lips 126 fully into the slot 134 engaging the upper box edges 128 with the ledges 130 and then shifting the box forwardly a distance sufficient to introduce the lip 124 into the slot 132 and against the forward end of the receiver opening 102. The housing 103 with the ejector 98 and spring 112 assembled thereon .is then inserted between the rear end of the box 110 and the forward endof the bottom opening 102 with the projections 122 entering the slots 120. Thus lips 124 and126 are caught in the slots 132 and 134 respectively and cannot be removed without dismantling the housing 108.

It will be appreciated that while the combination mounting of the ejector 98, its housing 108 and the magazine box 110 have certain unique cooperative relationships, it would be possible to attain advantages by mounting either one or the other in the manner described, utilizing the necessary functions attributable to each and yet by either using some other form of ejector mechanism or using some other means for mounting the magazine box.

As can be seen from FIG. 1 the magazine box 118 is disposed within a central opening through the rifle stock 20. A base plate 131 covers over the bottom of this opening and is held in place by the screws 24, 26. A follower plate 133 is urged upwardly from the base plate 131 by a spring 135. This arrangement, as illustrated, permits cartridges to be loaded through the upper and lower ports 100 and 162 into the magazine 38 in staggered relationship. The follower plate 133 is provided with an off-set projection 137 (FIG. 2) which insures that the cartridges will be caught on one side or the other of the bottom opening 182 (see 'FIG. 3) and not be fed loosely from the magazine 38. The cartridges project upwardly a sufiicient distance so that upon full retraction of the bolt 34 the rear end of the uppermost cartridge is picked up for projection by the bolt 34 centrally from the magazine and then carried into the firing chamber as the bolt is moved forward. It will be seen that the inbent ridges 139 are formed on the side walls of the magazine box 110 to engage the forward shoulders of the cartridge casings to prevent shucking of the cartridges and consequent damage to the tips of the bullets.

The firing mechanism for the present invention is uniquely simple and comprises a firing pin 136 (FIG. 5) centrally disposed within the tubular bolt body 32 and projecting through a central bore of the bolt head 52. A firing pin stop nut or stop piece 138 is threaded on the forward end of the firing pin 136 and is engageable with the rear end of the reduced bolt head diameter 54 to limit the protrusion of the forward end or point 141 of the firing pin 136 beyond the counterbore 73. The point 141 of the firing pin 136 is best seen in its cocked position in FIG. 9, wherein it can also be seen that the bore in the outermost end of the bolt head closely approximates the diameter of the point of the firing pin to minimize the amount of gas which may be blown rearwardly through the bolt body 42. As has been noted, the stop piece 138 controls the extent of firing pin protrusion, this being established by threading the stop piece 138 to the appropriate axial position on the firing pin 136.

A lock washer 140 (FIG. 5) maintains the stop piece 138 in adjusted position. More particularly, the lock washer 141) is formed with a central opening having a straight edge which non-rotatably engages a fiat 142 formed lengthwise of the firing pin 136 and has spurs projecting outwardly and received in notches formed in the rear end of the stop piece 138.

A main spring 144- is coiled about an intermediate length of the firing pin 136 and is seated at its forward end on the lock washer 140 and at its other end on a washer 146 which is axially positioned on the firing pin 136 by a cocking piece 148 threaded on the rear end thereof to preload the spring 144. The washer 146 is also non-rotatably mounted on the firing pin 136 by reason of a central hole having a straight edge (FIG. 11) engaging the flat 142. A sleeve 150 slidably surrounds the cocking piece 148 (FIG. 5) and is provided with projections 152 (FIG. 11) at its forward end which interdigitate with spurs extending outwardly of the washer 146. The sleeve (FIG. 10) at its rear end butts against a shoulder formed on the assembly screw 50 and is rotatably mounted thereon by means of indentations as at 154 which engage a peripheral groove 156 formed in the forward end of the screw 50. The sleeve 150 is provided with a lengthwise slot 158 having a width somewhat less than the diameter of a transverse hole 166 formed adjacent the rear end of the cocking piece 148. A cocking pin 162 (FIG. 8) is disposed within the hole 160 (FIG. 5) and retained therein by the marginal edges of the sleeve slot 158 embracing a necked portion adjacent the head of the pin 162. The head of cocking pin 162 is disposed adjacent the outer surface of the bolt body 42 passing through a cam opening 164 formed therein.

With this arrangement of parts, the firing pin may be cocked and fired in the following fashion. From FIG. 12 it will be seen that the head of the cooking pin 162, in the forward position of the bolt is disposed within the rear of receiver 22, entering into the near channel '70. A sear lever 166 projects upwardly into the near channel 7 0 (see also FIG. 13) in obstructive relation to farther forward movement of the cocking pin 162, and is integrally formed on a scar 169 to be later described in detail.

Normally the firing pin 141 is held in a retracted or cocked position by reason of spring 144 being compressed and held by the cocking pin resting in a notch 168 (FIG. 5) formed adjacent the rear end of the cam opening 164. In this position of the cocking pin 162 the cocking piece 148 and striker 136 are of course retracted while the spring 146 is compressed since the washer 146 is held relatively stationary by the sleeve 158. The above describes the relative disposition of the cocking pin 162 and related parts as the bolt 34- is moved forwardly to close the action of the rifle. After the action is closed, the bolt handle 36 is lowered to locked position as above described. In so lowering the handle 36, the bolt body 42 is rotated relative to the receiver 22 while the cocking pin remains relatively stationary being captured in the channel 70. The cocking pin 162 is thus held in cocked position at the rear of the greatest lengthwise extent of the opening 164 and the rifle is in readiness to be fired. Finger pressure on the trigger 40 will release the sear 169, in a manner later described, allowing the sear lever to swing downwardly out of the path of forward movement of the cocking pin 162 thereby permitting the firing pin to percussively strike the cartridge in the firing chamber under the influence of main spring 144. It will be noted that the cocking piece 148 is axially adjusted on the firing pin 136 to prevent the cocking pin 162 from striking the forward end of the opening 165.

After the rifle has thus been fired the bolt handle 36 is raised to its upper position thereby rotating the tubular bolt body 42 relative to the cocking pin 162. During this rotation the angularly confined pin 162 is displaced rearwardly by cam surface 171 (FIG. 5) of the opening 164 thereby camming the cocking pin 162 and with it the firing pin 136 rearwardly and reseating the cocking pin 162 in the notch 168. Spring means, later described, return the sear lever 166 to the position illustrated in FIG. 12 and the firing cycle just described may be repeated after retraction of the bolt 34 to eject an expended cartridge casing and return movement of the bolt to feed a fresh cartridge into the chamber.

The bolt and firing pin assembly above described comprise parts which may be readily fabricated primarily by screw machine operations and by sheet metal stampings. Their assembly in the original manufacture of the rifle as well as their disassembly for repair or adjustment is extremely simple and convenient. Disassembly involves merely the removal of screw 50 together with sleeve 150, removal of cocking pin 162, withdrawal of the firing pin 136 and removal of the pin 58 to take down the component parts of bolt 34. The main spring 144 may be removed by threading the cocking piece 148 off the rear end of firing pin 136. Adjustment of the extent of protrusion of the point 141 of the firing pin, may be made by telescoping the bolt head 52 over the point 141 in abutting relation with the stop piece 138. With lock-washer 146 removed, stop piece 138 may be varied axially of firing pin 136 to obtain the desired extension of point 141 beyond the inner face of counterbore 73. The extent of protrusion may be gauged by the sleeve 150 (FIG. With the extractor 74 removed the sleeve projections 152 may be brought against the counterbore '73 on either side of the firing pin 1 11 and the amount of protrusion set to match the height of the projections 152 which height is in fact the preferred distance for protrusion of the firing pin.

Normally when a cartridge is discharged its casing is expanded into sealing contact with the walls of the firing chamber preventing rearward escape of gases so that at least substantially all of the gases are propelled outwardly through the barrel of the rifle. However, in the case of an ineffective seal or rupturing of the cartridge casing, gases may blow back rearwardly of the firing chamber past the bolt head 52 which is locked in thebreech of the firing chamber. In order that gases may not injure the user of the rifle, various ports and battles are provided to deflect such gases laterally of the receiver. In FIG. 7, the tapered slot 96, when the bolt head is locked, is disposed to provide communication for the forward end of the bolt head 52 with a lateral hole 151 formed in the receiver 22 forward of the channel 70 (FIG. 2). The slot 96 thus provides conduit means for conducting gases from the rifle chamber to a predetermined location in the receiver. It will be noted that the baffle lug 64 is aligned with'the slot 56 and the port 151 for deflecting gases outwardly through the port 151. This will effectively minimize the passage of gases rearwardly of the front of the baflle. What little gas may pass between the bolt and receiver is throttled as it enters the opening 1% thereby safely dissipating its effect.

There may also be a possibility of gases passing through the firing pin hole opening of the counterbore 73 (FIG. 9). Such gases would pass interiorly of the bolt head and then be vented for the most part through a port 153 (FIG. 7) communicating with the interior of said bolt and aligned with a port 155 (FIG. 2) formed in the receiver 22. The firing pin hole and port 153 provide conduit means for conducting gases from the rifle chamber to a predetermined location in the receiver. The battle lug 64 is aligned with the ports 153 and 155 for deflecting gases outwardly of the receiver through the port 155. This effectively minimizes the passage of gases rearwardly of the baflle. There is also a possibility that some gases will pass rearwardly through the bolt body 42 and escape through the cam opening 164 which in the firing position of the bolt is enclosed within the rear end of the reeceiver 22. In order to prevent gases from escaping from the rear of the receiver 22 adjacent the eye of the shooter, member 84 is arranged to serve as a bathe member and is positioned at the rear end of the receiver to insure lateral deflection of such gases. This position of the member 84 is automatically provided for by the manner in which it is mounted on the bolt body 42. As has been noted, the member 84 is rotatable on the body 42 and as can be seen, is also axially slidable thereon. Thus, inthe primary ejection of an expended cartridge the member 84 will be firmly seated against the rear face of the receiver 22 when projection 88 (FIG. 8) engages cam surface 86 as previously described. This position of member 34 is also assumed when the action is locked, as indicated in FIG. 1.

The rear battle is free to slide forwardly and rearwardly slightly so that pressure of escaping gas will move it backward if necessary to escape.

The sear 169 and trigger 411 also embody certain novel'features which will be apparent from the following detailed description of their construction and operation with particular reference being had to FIGS. 12-16.

A U-shaped trigger mounting bracket 172 is secured beneath a tang 1'74 extending rearwardly of the receiver 22. More particularly the bracket 172 comprises a sheet metal stamping having its bridge vertically disposed towards the rear of tank 174. A tab 18% is bent rearwardly from the upper edge of the bridge of bracket 172 and is received in an appropriate recess 177 (FIGS. 12 and 16) formed adjacent the rear end of a slot 176 extending through the rear portion of tang 174. Recesses 181, 183 (FIG. 13) are formed on opposite sides of the lower surface of the receiver 22 and provide vertical faces which are embraced by cars 182 extending upwardly from the front ends of the arms of bracket 172. A pin 134 extends through the ears 182 and the embraced portion of receiver 22 to secure the front end of bracket 172 thereto with its upper edgesengaging the lower surface of tang 174 and its rear end retained in place by tab 180. The pin 184 is thus the single fastening element for the trigger mounting bracket 172.

The trigger 40 is pivotally mounted on a pin 186 extending between depending ears 187 (FIGS. 12 and 15) of the bracket 172. The trigger 41 comprises, as can be seen, a rearwardly extending leg 18% which is cooperatively disposed relative to a safety member 1911, later described in detail, and a forwardly extending leg 192 which is disposed in cooperative relationship with the sear 169.

The sear 169 is bent from a single piece of sheet metal and comprises two U-shaped portions one of which includes a bridge 196 (FIGS. '14 and 15) and arms 194, 195 embracing the bracket ears 182 (FIG. 13) and pivotally mounted on the pin 18 1. The second U-shaped portion comprises a second bridge 197 interconnecting the arm 195 with a third outwardly spaced arm 199.

The scar lever 166 is formed as an integral extension of the sear arm 195 and projects through slot 201 into channel 70 (FIGS. 13 and 16) to cooperate with the cocking pin 162 as above described. The sear arm 19? extends upwardly receiving the unheaded end of pin 184, and extending above the stock 211' (FIG. 13) adjacent a relieved portion 2tl3of the receiver 22. The upper end of arm 199 is outbent to provide a visual indicator 205 which may readily be checked when the action is closed to determine whether or not the firing pin is cocked. That is, when the firing pin is cocked the indicator 2155 is in its upper position seen in FIG. 12, and after the gun has been fired, forward movement of the cocking pin 162 depresses the sear lever 166 into slot 201 and rotates the sear 169 bringing the indicator 205 to a lower horizontal position.

- A torsion spring 206 (FIGS. 12 and 13) is disposed between the sear arms 195, 1%, being concentrically positioned on the pin 184 by a bushing 26 8. The free ends of the torsion spring 2% respectively bear against the rear surface of receiver recess 183 and the upper end of the bridge 197 to urge the sear 169 in a counterclockwise direction (FIG. 12) and thus return the cocking lever 166 to its upright position when the firing pin is cocked by manipulation of the bolt handle 36 as above described.

The sear 169 is latched in what may be termed its cocked position by the lower knife edge of the bridge 196 bearing against the forward face of the trigger leg 192. It will be seen that a spring loaded plunger 216 (FIG. 12) bears against the trigger leg 153 to urge the trigger leg 192 into obstructive relation with the sear bridge 1%. When the action is closed and the bolt locked in the receiver, the head of cocking pin 162 will engage the sear lever 166 and under the influence of main spring 144 tend to rotate the sear in a clockwise direction (FIG. 12) bringing the knife edge of bridge 1% into firm engagement with the forward face of trigger leg 192. The extent of this engagement is adjustably controlled by a screw 212 threaded into the outer end of leg 192. It will be apparent that if the screw 212 were threaded farther inwardly of the leg192 the bridge 196 would be disposed nearer the upper edge of the leg 192 and conversely if the screw 212 were threaded outwardly the spring loaded plunger 21% would rotate the trigger to space the knife edge of bridge 1% farther from the upper edge of the leg 192. In this manner the extent of trigger 9 travel necessary to release the cocking pin 162 may be controlled to suit the needs of the user of the gun.

The spring loaded plunger 211 is mounted on the safety member 190 which is longitudinally slidable between the arms of the trigger bracket 172.

The safety member 194 is provided with a thumb piece 22% which is integrally formed as a rearward extension of an upward projection from the safety member 199 and projecting upwardly through the tang slot 176. The thunrb piece 220 (FIG. 12) slidably engages the upper surface of tang 174 to provide the rear bearing point for the safety member 190. A pin 222 extends between the arms of bracket 172 and slidingly supports a forward horizontal undersurface of the safety member 191 An adjustable intermediate bearing point for the safety member is provided by an upwardly projecting screw 224 which is threaded into the safety member 199 and bears against the lower surface of tang 174.

Various surfaces formed on the trigger leg 183 cooperate with the safety member 190 as will now be described. A raised land 226 is formed at the rear of leg 18% beneath a screw 228 projecting from the safety member 191). When the safety member is in the safe position illustrated in FIG. 12, the screw 228 is in obstructive relation with land 226 thereby preventing any rotation of the trigger 40 sufficient to bring the leg 192 out of obstructive relation with the sear bridge 196, which in turn prevents release of the cocking pin 162 and discharge of the piece. The safety member is also arranged to lock the bolt 34 so that the action cannot be inadvertently opened when the gun is in safe condition. This is attained by an upstanding ing 23% projecting from the forward end of the safety member 190 through a second tang slot 232 (FIGS. 12 and 16) spaced forwardly of the slot 176. The bolt handle hub 44 is notched at 234 (FIG. 15) to receive the lug 239 when the bolt handle 36 is in its lower position thereby locking the bolt 34 with the action closed.

The trigger leg 18% is transversely notched at 229 to receive the spring loaded plunger 21% to provide detent means for releasingly maintaining the safety member 190 in its safe position.

The safety member 1911 is displaced forwardly of the notch 229 to a further safe position in which the screw 228 will still be disposed above the land 226 preventing releasing movement of the trigger 40 and wherein the lug 230 will be disposed forwardly of the bolt handle hub 44. In this position of the safety member 190 the action may be opened and closed by manipulation of the bolt handle 36, as, for example, to discharge an expended cartridge casing, or to empty the magazine 38 by reciprocation of bolt 34 without danger of firing the rifle.

In the forwardmost or firing position of the safety member the screw 228 is spaced forwardly of the raised land 226 allowing suflicient movement of the trigger 40 to release the sear 169, thereby releasing the firing pin. A second transverse notch 231 is formed in the trigger leg 188 to receive the spring loaded plunger 210 and releasably maintain the safety member 190 in its firing or inoperative position. Travel of the trigger beyond that necessary to bring the leg 192 out of obstructive relationship with the sear bridge 196 may be limited by a screw 236 threaded into the same hole as the screw 224 and projecting from the lower surface of safety member 190. Thus, immediately upon release of the sear 169 the trigger leg 183 may be arranged to engage the screw 236 thereby minimizing the extent of trigger travel after firing the rifle. The force of trigger pull is primarily controlled by a spring 216, confined by a screw 218, and (FIG. 12) urging the plunger 210 into engagement with the trigger leg 188. The force of spring 216 may be varied by the extent to which screw 213 is threaded into the safety 19%. With the safety member 190 in the illustrated safe position, it will be seen that the upper end of screw 218 is accessible through 10 slot 176 to receive a screw driver whereby the force of spring 216 may be readily adjusted without disassembly of the rifle components.

A further point to be noted is that the sear lever 166 also serves as a bolt stop. That is, when the bolt is retracted, the right hand (FIGS. 5 and 13) battle lug 64 will engage the sear lever 166 thereby limiting rearward travel of the bolt 34. When it is desired to remove the bolt, trigger 41) is pulled to drop the trigger leg 19 2 below sear bridge 196 and then cocking indicator 205 is depressed (see also FIG. 12) to lower cocking lever 166 below the level of channel 70 thereby permitting the bolt 34 to be withdrawn from the receiver 22.

Operation The rifle is loaded by inserting cartridges downwardly into the magazine while the bolt 34 is disposed in its retracted position. A cartridge is rammed into the firing chamber of the rifle by forward movement of the bolt, lip 76 of the extractor 74 engaging the groove of the cartridge case. As the bolt 34 is moved forwardly in the receiver the cocking pin 162 engages the sear lever 166 (FIG. 12). When the bolt is rotated to its breech closing position, the cooking pin is prevented from rotating by channel 76) of the receiver and is held in its cocked position at the rear of the bolt cam opening 164 (FIGS. 5 and 8) by the sear lever 166. The cocking indicator 205 (FIG. 12) is disposed in its upwardly extending position indicating the cooked condition of the rifle. When the bolt is rotated to its locked position, the lock lugs 60* are carried into engagement with the shoulders 72 in the breech end of the receiver thus locking the bolt in its closed position. The baflle lugs 64 are prevented from rotating by channel 70 and are held thereby in axial alignment rearwardly of the receiver gas escape ports 151 and 155 (FIG. 2) and the slot 96 and port 153 (FIG. 7) on opposite sides of the bolt 34.

The cooking pin 162 is held in its cocked position against the force of the compressed main spring 144 by the sear 169 which is prevented from rotating by the trigger leg 192. As shown in FIG. 12, the plunger 210 urges the trigger leg into its sear engaging position. When the trigger is pulled, the plunger 210 is forced upwardly against spring 216 and the trigger leg 192 is pivoted downwardly releasing the cooking pin 162. The firing pin is thrust forwardly by the main spring 144 firing the round in the chamber and the cooking pin 1'62 moves the sear lever 166 downwardly out of the channel 70.

In the event of rupture of a cartridge case, escaping gases are deflected outwardly through the gas escape ports by means of the baflle lugs 64. Furthermore, any gas which might escape rearwardly of the baffle lugs will be deflected outwardly by the rear baffle 84.

To discharge the cartridge case after a round is fired, the bolt handle 36 is rotated counterclockwise. Projection 8 8 (FIG. 8) of the bolt handle engages the cam face 86 of the rear baflle and the bolt is cammed rearwardly to break the seal of the cartridge case in the chamber.

As the bolt handle 36 is raised, the cooking pin 162 is prevented from rotating by channel 76 (FIG. 12) and is displaced rearwardly by the cam surface 171 (FIG. 5) of the opening 164. The cooking pin 162 is thus re-seated in the notch 168, its position prior to loading the round into the chamber. The sear spring 266 returns the sear 169 to the position illustrated in FIG. 12.

As the bolt is pulled rearwardly to eject the cartridge case, the ejector 98 is received inthe slot 96 (FIG. 6) of the bolt and the ejector strikes the lower edge of the cartridge case which is then ejected from the re ceiver. Another round may then be loaded into the chamber and the firing cycle repeated.

'It will be noted from the disclosure as seen in the drawings that the rifle is for a right handed shooter. Very few parts of the assembly would require changes in order to convert the same for left handed shooting. The bolt body, handle, and head, the extractor, the receiver port, the rear bafiie, and "the stock are the only parts requiring conversion to manufacture guns for the left hand shooter. The remaining mechanism need not be altered and accordingly most of the component parts can be interchangeably used for right hand or left hand rifles.

Having thus described the invention what is novel and desired to be secured by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. In a rifle, a receiver having a lengthwise bore, a bolt slidably and rotatably mounted in said bore, an operating handle secured to the rear end of said bolt, firing pin means disposed within said bolt and spring urged forwardly thereof, said bolt having a cam opening adjacent its rear end, a cooking pin connected to said firing pin mechanism and extending outwardly thereof through said cam opening, said bolt having oppo sitely and laterally projecting lock lugs at its forward end in predetermined angular relation to said cam opening, said receiver having horizontally disposed channels extending outwardly of said bore and slidably receiving said lock lugs and means for locking said lugs relative to said receiver in the forward position of said bolt upon rotative movement of the bolt, said angular relation being such that in this locked position said cam opening is generally aligned with one of said channels with the cocking pin extending therein and confined against rotative movement relative to said receiver, a sear pivotally mounted relative to said receiver and having a lever projecting upwardly into said one channel and releasably holding said cocking pin in cocked position in said locked position of said bolt, said sear being displaceable upon release to permit forward movement of said cocking pin when the rifle is fired, said angular relation further being such that when said bolt is rotated to bring the lock lugs into alignment with said channels, the cocking pin is cammed reaiwardly by a forward wall of said cam opening as the lock lugs are brought into alignment with said channels and means for returning said sear lever into projecting release in said one channel and in obstructive relation with one of said lock lugs whereby when the bolt is retracted the lever acts as a stop preventing removal of the bolt from the receiver.

2. In a rifie, a receiver having a lengthwise bore, a

bolt slidably and rotatably mounted in said bore, an

operating handle secured to the rear end of said bolt, said bolt having a cam opening adjacent its rear end, a cooking pin for cocking a firing pin mechanism within said bolt, said cocking pin extending outwardly of said bolt through said cam opening, said bolt having oppositely and laterally projecting lock lugs at its front end in predetermined angular relation to said cam opening, said receiver having horizontally disposed channels extending outwardly of said bore and slidably receiving said lock lugs, means for locking said lugs relative to said receiver in the forward position of said bolt upon rotative movement of the bolt, said angular relation being such that in this locked position said cam opening is generally aligned with one of said channels with the cooking pin extending therein and confined against rotative movement relative to said receiver, a sear pivotally mounted on said receiver and having a lever projecting into said one channel in its normal position, said sear further comprising a latching portion, a pivotal trigger releasably engaging said latching portion and maintaining said sear lever in projecting relation and thereby holding said cocking pin in cocked. position, said sear being rotatable upon releasing movement of said trigger out of the path of forward movement of said cocking pin, a visual indicator movable with said sear to indicate whether the cocking pin is in its cocked position, said angular relation further being such that When said bolt is rotated to bring the lock lugs into alignment with said channels the cooking pin is cammed into cocked position by the forward wall of said cam opening, means for returning said sear to its normal position and means for returning said trigger into latching engagement with said sear.

3. In a rifle, a receiver having a lengthwise bore, a bolt slidable therein, means for locking said bolt in its forward position, said receiverhaving a horizontally disposed channel adjacent its rear end, a cooking pin projecting from said bolt into said channel and movable between cocked and uncooked positions, a sear comprising a first =U-shaped portion the arms of which embrace the receiver, a pin extending through said receiver and pivotally receiving the arms of said first U-shaped portion, a lever projecting from one of said arms into said channel and holding said cocking pin in cocked position in the normal position of said sear, a pivotal trigger releasably engaging the bridge of said first U-shaped portion to hold said sear in its normal position, said sear further comprising a second U-shaped portion having a bridge connecting an outwardly disposed arm with one of the arms of said first U-shaped portion, said out- Wardly disposed arm projecting upwardly for visual inspection to determine whether the sear is in its normal position with the cocking pin in cocked position, said cocking pin being arranged to move forwardly to its uncooked position upon disengagement of said trigger from the bridge of said first U-shaped portion and thereby rotate said sear out of its normal position.

4. In a rifle, a receiver having a lengthwise bore, a bolt slidable therein, means for locking said bolt in its forward position, said receiver having a horizontally disposed channel adjacent its rear end, a cocking pin projecting from said bolt into said channel and movable between cocked and uncocked positions, a sear comprising a first U-shaped portion the arms of which embrace the receiver and are connected by a latching bridge therebeneath, a pin extending through said receiver and pivotally receiving said arms, a lever projecting from one of said arms into said channel and holding said cocking pin in cocked poition in thenormal position of said sear, a trigger pivotally mounted beneath and to the rear of said latching bridge, said trigger having an upwardly angled leg, the end face of which is engaged in latching relation by the rear edge of the latching bridge to releasably maintain said sear in its normal position, means urging said trigger into this sear latching position, a headed screw threaded into the free end of said trigger arm and adjustable toward and away from its end face to control the distance said latching bridge is spaced from the upper edge of said end face, said sear further comprising a second U-shaped portion having a bridge connecting an outwardly disposed arm with one of the arms of said first U-shaped portion, said outwardly disposed arm projecting upwardly for visual inspection to determine whether the sear is in its normal position with the cocking pin in cocked position, said cocking pin being arranged to displace said sear from its normal position in moving to its-uncocked position upon disengagement of said trigger leg from said latching bridge.

5. in a rifle, a receiver having a lengthwise bore, a bolt slidable therein, means for locking said boit in its forward position, said receiver having a horizontally disposed channel adjacent its rear end, a cooking pin projecting from said bolt into said channel and movable between cooked and uncooked positions, a sear comprising a first U-shaped portion the arms of which embrace the receiver and are connected by a latching bridge therebeneath, a pin extending through said receiver and pivotally receiving said arms, a lever projecting from one of said arms into said channel and holding said 13 cocking pin in cocked position in the normal position of said sear, a trigger pivotally mounted beneath and to the rear of said latching bridge, said trigger having an upwardly angled leg, the end face of which is engaged adjacent its upper edge in latching relation by the rear edge of the latching bridge to releasably maintain said sear in its normal position, means urging said trigger into this sear latching position, a headed screw threaded into the free end of said trigger arm and adjustable toward and away from its end face to control the distance from said upper edge that said latching bridge engages the end face of said trigger.

6. In a rifle, a receiver having a lengthwise bore, a bolt slidable therein, means for locking said bolt in its forward position, said receiver having a horizontally disposed channel adjacent its rear end, a cocking pin projecting from said bolt into said channel and movable between cocked and uncocked positions, said receiver having opposed recesses formed in its lower portion generally beneath said cocking pin, said recesses including opposed vertical faces and at least one horizontal face, said receiver further comprising a rearwardly extending tang having a slot adjacent its rear end, a U-shaped sheet metal trigger mounting bracket having its bridge generally vertically disposed and aligned with the rear of said tang slot and with its arms extending forwardly thereof, the bridge of said bracket having a tab extending upwardly through said tang slot and rearwardly to engage an upper surface of said tang, said bracket further having tabs extending upwardly from the forward ends of its arms and embracing the vertical faces of said receiver recesses, a retaining pin extending through said bracket tabs and said receiver as the single fastening element for mounting said bracket on said receiver, a sear comprising a first U-shaped portion, the arms of which are pivotally mounted on said retaining pin and embracing said bracket tabs, a lever projecting from one of said sear arms into said channel and holding said cocking pin in cocked position in the normal position of said sear, a trigger pivotally mounted on a pin extending between the arms of said mounting bracket and having a forwardly extending leg for engaging the bridge of said first U- shaped portion in latching relationship to hold said sear in its normal position, said sear further comprising a second U-shaped portion having a bridge connecting an outwardly disposed arm with one of the arms of said first U-shaped portion, said bridge being disposed rearwardly of said retaining pin with its upper edge spaced beneath said horizontal face of one of said receiver recesses, said retaining pin projecting into an aperture formed in said outwardly disposed arm, a torsion spring disposed between the arms of said second U-shaped portion and around said retaining pin with the free ends thereof respectively engaging said horizontal recess face and the upper edge of the bridge of said second U-shaped portion, said cocking pin being arranged to move forwardly to its uncocked position upon disengagement of said trigger from the sear latching bridge and thereby rotate said sear out of its normal position, said sear being returned to its normal position by said torsion spring upon return of the cocking pin to its cocked position.

7. in a rifle, a receiver having a lengthwise bore, a bolt slidable therein, means for locking said bolt in its forward position, said receiver having a horizontally disposed channel adjacent its rear end, a cocking pin projecting from said bolt into said channel and movable between cooked and uncocked positions, said receiver having opposed recesses formed in its lower portion gen erally beneath said cocking pin, said recesses including opposed vertical faces and at least one horizontal face, said receiver further comprising a rearwardly extending tang having a slot adjacent its rear end, a U-shaped sheet metal trigger mounting bracket having its bridge generally vertically disposed and aligned with the rear of said tang slot and with its arms extending forwardly thereof,

the bridge of said bracket having a tab extending upwardly through said tang slot and rearwardly to engage an upper surface of said tang, said bracket further having tabs extending upwardly from the forward ends of its arms and embracing the vertical faces of said receiver recesses, a retaining pin extending through said bracket tabs and said receiver as the single fastening element for mounting said bracket on said receiver, a scar comprising a first U-shaped portion, the arms of which are pivotally mounted on said retaining pin and embracing said bracket tabs, a lever projecting from one of said sear arms into said channel and holding said cocking pin in cocked position in the normal position of said sear, a trigger pivotally mounted on a pin extending between the arms of said mounting bracket and having a forwardly extending leg for engaging the bridge of said first U- shaped portion in latching relationship to hold said sear in its normal position, said sear further comprising a second U-shaped portion having a bridge connecting an outwardly disposed arm with one of the arms of said first U-shaped portion, said bridge being disposed rearwardly of said retaining pin with its upper edge spaced beneath said horizontal face of one of said receiver recesses, said retaining pin projecting into an aperture formed in said outwardly disposed arm, a torsion spring disposed between the arms of said second U-shaped portion and around said retaining pin with the free ends thereof respectively engaging said horizontal recess face and the upper edge of the bridge of said second U-shaped portion, said cocking pin being arranged to move forwardly to its uncocked position upon disengagement of said trigger from the sear latching bridge and thereby rotate said sear out of its normal position, said sear being returned to its normal position by said torsion spring upon return of the cocking pin to its cocked position.

8. In a bolt action rifle having a receiver, a bolt slid ably and rotatably disposed in said receiver, said bolt including a cooking pin disposed in said receiver, a firing mechanism comprising a bracket disposed on the underside of said receiver, a trigger pivotably mounted on said bracket, a pin supported by said bracket, a scar pivotably disposed on said pin, said sear having a portion engaged with the trigger when said rifle is cooked, said sear further including a lever portion extending into the receiver of said rifle and engaging said cocking pin when in a cocked condition, said sear being of integral construction and including an indicator lever disposed without said receiver to indicate cocked and uncocked condition of said rifle.

9. In a bolt action rifle having a receiver, a bolt slidably and rotatably disposed in said receiver, said bolt including a cocking pin in said receiver, a firing mechanism comprising a bracket disposed on theunderside of said receiver, a trigger pivotably supported by said bracket, said bracket being held in place by a retaining pin, a scar pivotably mounted on said retaining pin, said receiver including a slot opening therethrough, said sear including a lever portion extending through said slot into said receiver for releasably holding said cocking pin in its cocked condition, said trigger having a forwardly extending leg portion engageable with said sear for holding said sear in its cocked position, a spring disposed on said retaining pin releasably urging said sear toward its cocked position, said sear including an indicator lever disposed externally of said receiver on one side thereof for indicating the cocked and uncocked condition of said rifle, the upper end of said indicator lever being parallel to the axis of said receiver when said cocking pin is released and at a predetermined oblique angle relative to said axis when said lever is cocked.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1741281 *Apr 22, 1929Dec 31, 1929Winchester Repeating Arms CoTrigger mechanism for firearms
US2765562 *Feb 20, 1953Oct 9, 1956Savage Arms CorpTrigger mechanism for bolt action firearms
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3710492 *Dec 2, 1970Jan 16, 1973Emhart CorpTravel guide for bolt action rifles
US6401378 *Dec 27, 1999Jun 11, 2002Sommer + Ockenfuss GmbhSafety mechanism for a breechblock for repeating weapons
US7185454 *Jul 20, 2004Mar 6, 2007S.A.T. Swiss Arms Technology AgBreech for a repeater weapon
US7650827 *Mar 18, 2004Jan 26, 2010The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyRocket loading and unloading tool
US20050188577 *Jul 20, 2004Sep 1, 2005S.A.T. Swiss Arms Technology AgBreech for a repeater weapon
Classifications
U.S. Classification42/69.2, 42/16, 89/26, 42/106
International ClassificationF41A19/31, F41A19/00, F41A19/34
Cooperative ClassificationF41A19/31, F41A19/34
European ClassificationF41A19/31, F41A19/34
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 9, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: SAVAGE INDUSTRIES, INC., SPRINGDALE RD., WESTFIELD
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:EMHARDT INDUSTRIES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:003938/0104
Effective date: 19810923