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Publication numberUS3106327 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 8, 1963
Filing dateFeb 25, 1958
Priority dateFeb 25, 1958
Publication numberUS 3106327 A, US 3106327A, US-A-3106327, US3106327 A, US3106327A
InventorsKarl Clarence O
Original AssigneeUnited Shoe Machinery Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fiber containers
US 3106327 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 3,106,327 FIBER CONTAINERS Clarence 0. Kari, Danvers, Mass assignor, by mesne assignments, to United Shoe Machinery Corporation, Boston, Mass a corporation of New Jersey Filed Feb..25, 1958, Ser. No. 717,468

7 Claims. (Q1. 2 29-4.5)

This invention relates in general to container structures and is more particularly addressed to inexpensive fiber containers, incorporating lapped seam COIlSlZIllCtlOIl,

'This outstanding problem is greatly aggravatedin lapped seam container or can bodies fabricated from paper, cardboard, chip board, and similar natural and synthetic available commercial fibrous materials, particularly adjacent the interior raw cut edge of the lapped seam of the container body, which edge acts to produce a wicking action for the liquid phases of the container contents.

It is also recognized that fibrous container bodies, as

a result of their inherent pervious or porous nature and interiorly exposed raw cut marginal edge adjacent a lapped seam joint in their construction, present a problem of deterioration and/or corrosive attack by many products. packaged therein, even in the dry state..

The present invention has as one of its objects the pro vision of a fiber container capable of preventing moisture seepage and/ or deterioration from within the same.

Another object of the invention isto provide a flexible fiber container body incorporating a liquid impervious lapped seam in its construction.

A further object of the invention is to provide a fiber container body having a continuous impervious and/or corrosion resistant layer or lamina on the exterior and interior surfaces of a fibrous blank from which'the container body has been fabricated. 1

Numerous other objects and advantages will be appreciated and understood from consideration of the following description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing illustrating a preferred embodiment of the invention, in which: i

FIG. 1 is an edge view of a blank from which the container body is preferably fabricated;

FIG. 2 shows the body blank of FIG. 1 undergoing transformation in the formation of a container body;

FIG. 3 represents a transformed double-ply arrangement and disposition of the body blank of FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 4 illustrates a fragmentary end view of a container body incorporating 'a lapped seam and fabricated from the double-ply blank of FIG. 3-; and

FIG. 5 is a partial elevational view of a container body, with a section adjacentan end cover member secured thereto, broken away. i v

A typical container body fabricated in accordance with the invention is formed from a single blank 10 of fibrous material provided on at least one major planar: surface with a layer or lamina 11 suitably attached thereto. The blank 10 maybe selected from a broad range of cellulose fibrous paper base materials, such as pulp board, cardboard,'chip board, kraft paper and similar available commercial paper stock, as Well as from synthetic fibrous stocks manufactured from Dacron, nylon, and/or mixphane, polyethylene, and the like.

ice

. 2 tures thereof, and similar synthetic materials, any one or all of which, because of their inherent porous or pervious nature, can give rise to a problem of moisture leakage and/ or deterioration from attack by wet or dry products packaged in direct contact therewith.

The lamina or layer 11, on the other hand, is selected from a moisture-impervious and/or corrosion resistant material, such as metallic foils, or any one of the commercially available organic film materials, such as cello- The layer 11 will obviously be selected as the most efficient and desirable material for direct contact with the product or products to be packed, as well as being impervious and resistant to attack by the products in contact therewith.

The layer 11 must also be applied in the form of a continuous, unbroken layer over the entire surface area of at least one major planar surface of the base stock or blank 1t), and be adhesively or otherwise attached thereto. Any suitable commercially available adhesive exhibiting non-brittle setting properties, is preferably employed for this purpose, although the lamina 11 maybe selected with inherent heat-sealing properties permitting direct heat-sealed attachment to the blank 10.

Having selected the fibrous stock or blank 10, and liquid-impervious lamina 11 compatible with the product to be packaged, the laminated blank 1011 is folded double-ply on itself to provide the composite blank of FIG. 3., In this operation, the fibrous material 10- may be scored at 12 to a depth less than its gauge thickness to aid the folding or'doubling operation, and any suitable commercial adhesive or cement, that is non-brittle on setting, should be employed between the superimposed surfaces of the folded 'blank to insure the unitary double-ply blank of FIG. 3. V

In FIG. 4, a fragmentary end plan view of a lapped seam cylindrical container body fabricated from the double-ply blank of FIG. 3, is illustrated. It will be observed that the fibrous material or blank 10, from which the cylindrical container body has been formed, is exposed on three of its edges, termed cut or raw edges, whereas the folded or fourth edge of the blank is completely encased by the continuous unbroken impervious layer or lamina 11. It is also to be observed that the folded and lamina-encased edge is disposed on the interior of the container body at the lapped seam incorporated in its construction.

Any number of commercially available cements or adhesives may be employed to complete and secure the lapped seam of the container body, a heat-meltable or thermoplastic adhesive being preferred where the layer 11 is selected in the form of an impervious metallic foil. On the other hand, an impervious organic cellophane or polyethylene lamina 11 may be directly heat-sealed on the blank 10, as well as in the area of the lapped seam joint between such organic laminae. It is sufficient to state that the adhesive employed in the lapped seam contacting surfaces should be impervious and leak-proof in terms of the contents of the container body.

Fiber or metal end closures of covers 14 are employed .to complete the container of FIG. 5. In the event fiber covers are used, such elements would preferably be made, asby forming dies, from material in the form of the double-ply blank of FIG. 3, which would insure presence of the protective layer or lamina 11. disposed inwardly towards the contents of the container. Otherwise a metal cover or end closure 14 has been shown in FIG. 5 in clamping engagement with the peripheral wallof the otherwise open end of a cylindrical lapped seam container body constructed in accordance with the invention, as above described. The metal cover would normally be selected in the same metal employed for the metallic foil lamina 11.

The end closure 14, may, if desired, be adhesively treated, particularly on the interior surfaces defining the inverted channel-shaped marginal flange in direct surface engagement with the cut edge forming the peripheral end walls of the container body.

The exterior surface of the container body is usually printed or otherwise decorated as to the source and contents of the completed sealed container. In this connection, the exposed layer or lamina 11 would normally be printed over approximately half the length of the blank shown in FIG. 1 in a flat condition, the subsequent doubling of the blank to provide the double-ply laminate of FIG. 3 insuring an externally printed container body and finished container in accordance with FIGS. 4 and 5.

A specific example of a container made in accordance with the invention employed a single sheet 10 of 90 pound kraft paper stock coextensively and adhesively bound to a layer of aluminum foil of .00035" gauge thickness over one entire major surface area of the blank 10. The exposed foil layer or lamina 11 of the laminate thus produced was surface-printed and decorated over substantially half its area in its fiat condition, as viewed in FIG. 1, thereafter adhesively coated on its major planar fibrous surface, folded double on itself to provide the unitary double-ply blank of FIG. 3, and then transformed, as by progressively wrapping the same around a horn or mandrel, to form a tubular container body, such as illustrated in FIG. 4, and the completed container of FIG. 5.

It will be manifest that minor changes may be made in the container structures of the invention, without departing from the intended spirit and scope thereof, as defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A tubular container body formed from a single sheet of liquid-pervious fibrous stock having a liquid-impervious metallic tfoil lamina secured to one entire planar surface area of the stock, and the stock scored and bent double in half on itself along the scored portion to present the metallic foil on its oppositely disposed planar surfaces and continuously over the bent marginal edge thereof, an adhesive layer securing the doubled stock, and an adhesively secured lapped seam between oppositely disposed marginal edges of the doubled stock, including the bent edge thereof, said bent and foil-covered marginal edge of the stock being interiorly disposed within the tubular container body.

2. A tubular fiber container body constituted by a laminated blank comprising a single sheet of liquid-pervious fibrous stock and unitarily attached continuous metallic foil layer folded in half double and adhesively secured with the foil layer covering the entire areas of the oppositely disposed planar surfaces of the doubled blank and bent marginal edge thereof, and an adhesively secured lapped seam between oppositely disposed marginal edges of the doubled blank, including the bent marginal edge thereof, said lapped seam having the bent foilencased marginal edge disposed interiorly the tubular container body.

3. A tubular fiber container body constituted by a single sheet of a liquid-pervious fibrous material folded along a score line in the surface of the fibrous material and unitarily adhesively secured double on itself and provided on its exposed planar surfaces with an adhesively attached liquid-impervious lamina in continuous strip form overlying the bent marginal edge thereof, and a lapped seam between oppositely disposed marginal edges of the tubular container body, said lapped seam being secured by a heat-meltable adhesive and incorporating the bent, liquid-impervious lamina-supporting marginal edge on the interior wall of the tubular container body.

4, A-wet pack fiber container comprising a tubular body constituted by a single sheet of a liquid-pervious fibrous material scored transversely to a depth less than its gauge thickness and folded and adhesively secured double on itself along the score line and provided with a liquidimpervious lamina in the form of a single continuous strip of aluminum foil adhesively secured to the exposed major planar surfaces of the doubled fibrous stock and contiguous marginal folded edge thereof, a lapped seam between the oppositely disposed marginal edges of the aluminum faced doubled fibrous stock secured by a liquid impervious adhesive, said lapped seam having the alug minum faced contiguous marginal folded edge disposed interiorly the container body, and end covers secured to the opposite ends of the container body, said end covers incorporating a liquid-impervious adhesive between themselves and the container body in contact therewith.

5. A method of fabricating a tubular fiber container body deterioration-proofed against contents enclosed thereby comprising first forming an adhesively secured laminate of pervious fibrous stock and an impervious continuous protective layer in continuous sheet form over one major planar surface area of the fibrous stock, then folding and adhesively securing the laminate in half on itself to provide a double-ply laminate with the impervious protective layer exteriorly disposed, and thereafter over lapping oppositely disposed marginal edges of the doubleply laminate and securing the same to provide a tubular container body with the interior marginal edge of the underlying laminate encased in the impervious protective layer.

6. A method of fabricating a wet pack tubular container body comprising adhesively securing a liquid-impervious sheet layer over the entire planar surface area of a single sheet of liquid-pervious fibrous stock to form a laminated rectangular blank having four cut marginal edges, bending, folding and adhesively securing superimposed fibrous planar surfaces of the laminated blank to provide a smaller unitary rectangular blank of half the size of the initial blank having three exposed cut marginal edges and one contiguous bent marginal edge encased within the liquidimpervious sheet layer, overlapping oppositely disposed marginal edges of the smaller rectangular blank, including the contiguous bent and encased marginal edge disposed on the interior wall of tubular container body, and securing the overlapped marginal edges by a heatsealable adhesive.

7. A method of fabricating a wet pack container comprising the steps, adhesively securing a liquid-impervious strip of aluminum foil over the entire planar surface area of a single sheet of liquid-pervious fibrous stock to form a rectangular laminated blank presenting four out marginal edges, scoring, bending, folding and adhesively securing superimposed fibrous surfaces of the laminated blank to provide a smaller rectangular blank of half the size of the initial blank having three exposed cut marginal edges and one contiguous foil-encased marginal edge, forming a tubular container body from the small rectangular blank by overlapping oppositely disposed marginal edges thereof, including the contiguous foil-encased marginal edge disposed on the interior wall surface of the tubular container body, securing the overlapped marginal edges by means of a moisture-proof adhesive, and applying metal end covers on the tubular body blank.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,118,565 Meade May 24, 1938 2,190,479 Moore Feb. 13, 1940 2,275,157 Morgan Mar. 3, 1942 2,278,502 Waters Apr. 7, 1942 2,440,339 Langer Apr. 27, 1948

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2118565 *Dec 11, 1933May 24, 1938Internat Container Coatings CoLayered structure and process of making the same
US2190479 *Aug 16, 1938Feb 13, 1940Humoco CorpMethod and means for making containers
US2275157 *Dec 23, 1939Mar 3, 1942Canister CompanyMethod of manufacturing fiber containers
US2278502 *Jul 18, 1936Apr 7, 1942Waters Harry FContainer and package
US2440339 *Nov 24, 1942Apr 27, 1948Walter LangerTube of flexible composite sheet material and the manufacture thereof
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3195799 *May 8, 1962Jul 20, 1965Maurice DenenbergCans and method of making the same
US3213890 *Dec 31, 1962Oct 26, 1965United Shoe Machinery CorpTubular bodies
US3498798 *Jul 29, 1966Mar 3, 1970Procter & GamblePackaging of chip-type snack food products
US6085970 *Nov 30, 1998Jul 11, 2000Insulair, Inc.Insulated cup and method of manufacture
US6196454 *Jun 6, 2000Mar 6, 2001Insulair, Inc.Insulated cup and method of manufacture
US6257485 *Aug 7, 2000Jul 10, 2001Insulair, Inc.Insulated cup and method of manufacture
US6378766 *Mar 5, 2001Apr 30, 2002Insulair, Inc.Insulated cup and method of manufacture
US7458504Oct 12, 2006Dec 2, 2008Huhtamaki Consumer Packaging, Inc.Multi walled container and method
US7922071Aug 5, 2008Apr 12, 2011Huhtamaki, Inc.Multi walled container and method
US7993254Oct 26, 2007Aug 9, 2011Huhtamaki, Inc.Multi walled container and method
US8002170Jul 25, 2008Aug 23, 2011Sonoco Development, Inc.Dual-ovenable container formed of a paper-based laminate
US8708880Nov 14, 2007Apr 29, 2014Pactiv LLCThree-layered containers and methods of making the same
EP2147871A1 *Apr 15, 2009Jan 27, 2010Sonoco Development, Inc.Dual-ovenable container formed of a paper-based laminate
WO2000032482A1 *Nov 24, 1999Jun 8, 2000Insulair IncInsulated cup and method of manufacture
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/4.5, 229/5.84, 229/5.82
International ClassificationB65D8/06, B65D3/00, B65D3/22, B65D8/04
Cooperative ClassificationB65D3/22
European ClassificationB65D3/22