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Publication numberUS3106397 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 8, 1963
Filing dateSep 15, 1960
Priority dateSep 15, 1960
Publication numberUS 3106397 A, US 3106397A, US-A-3106397, US3106397 A, US3106397A
InventorsLacey Frederick S
Original AssigneeLacey Frederick S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ball toy
US 3106397 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

INV EN TOR.

FREDERICK LACEY ATTORNEY Oct. 8, 1963 F. s. LACEY 3,106,397

BALL. TOY

med sept. 15. 1960 4 sheets-.sheet 2 INVENTOR. FREDERICK S. LACEY yATTORNEY oct. s, 1963 F. s. LACEY 3,106,397

BALL TOY Filed Sept. 15, 1960 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 F/G. 6. l v 3? 743 /aaA INVENTOR. FREDERICK 5. LACEY TTORNE Y F. S. LACEY l oct. s, 1963 BALL TOY 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Sept. l5. 1960 INVENTOR. FREDERICK 5. LACEY ATTORNEY The invention relates to toys andV more particularly ball toys of a type capable of motion apart from that irn- `parted by the player.

Balls are a universal toy with a great deal of appeal for players of all ages. There are a large variety of toy balls, some which bounce, others for throwing games and still others form more specialized uses. Many attempts have been made to create a toy with greater appealby altering the configuration, or the center of gravity `of a ball, or by providing clock mechanisms to alter its path so that amusing and unexpected deviations from the launched path result. Many of the mechanisms involved in such attempts have been so complicated and expensive as to preclude sale of the device once it` wasperfe'cted. I have United States Fatentilice invented a ball toy whichis simple to use, requires no viating in divertingiashion from the course imposed by the launching throw of aplayer'` i f i The inventiony contemplatesa toyV comprising a hub from which a `'radial guide projects and a thrust member movable along the guide to extend therefrom. The toy i also includes means for expelling the thrust member outwardly `and latching means for locking the thrust member against the expelling force.v A trigger adapted to defeat the latching means is operable on contact of the toy with a surface. 'The invention may employ a pluralitylof radial guides and associated thrust members, and may or may not include an outer round shell. The shell may be either of a resilient material supported lby the radial guide or own expulsion ,member or acommon compression memberl may be used to expel all `of a plurality ofthe thrust members of a ball toy. i

Thematerials from which the toy of the Vinvention may be formed are readily available on thev market and'fabrication of the toy is relatively simple, These andother advantages of the invention are apparent inthe following detailed description and drawing, in which- FIG. `l is `schematic representation of the invention moving along one of the erratic paths which such a ball toymay take; I l

FIG. 2 is an elevational view partly broken away,illus trating an embodiment of the invention having compression springs as expulsion members; 'i f f FlG. 3 isV an enlarged fragmentary sectional elevation taken in the area 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. '4 is atragmentary sectional'elevation taken along line fil-iotFlG-3;` u

` FIG. 5 is a fragmentary sectional elevationsimilar to FIG. 3 illustrating :an alternate means of latching the i thrust member against the vexpulsion force;

FlG. 6 is :a Vfragmentary sectional elevation showing analternate embodiment of the invention having an extension spring as an expulsion means for the thrust member;V l L FIG. 7 is `a further alternate embodiment of the invention shown in perspective and partlyin section;

FIG. Sis an elevational View of a ball toyin accordt expensive vmechanism andupossesses a capacity for dethrust member and radial guide `assembly mayhave its `v dbh? Patented Oct. 8, 1963 Y 2 ance with the invention including a multiplicity of thrust members;

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary sectional elevation of a pre- :ferred embodiment ofthe invention having a common compression member as the expulsion means for the thrust members; and

FIG. l0 is .an elevational view, partly broken away, of the retaining cage for the common compression members showing a compression member beinginserted into the cage.

In FIG. l a ball toy 12 is represented as striking a surface 13 after being thrown by a player from dotted position 14 along a path 15. The ball toy has a plurality of thrust members 16 protruding from an outer shell 18. When a thrust member such as member 16A strikes against the surface the thrust member is expelled outwardly, Expulsion is preferably rapid to cause the ball to be propelled along dotted path i9, which deviates from the original thrown path 15. When the ball 12 alights upon the surface so that a ditlerent thrust member 16B strikes the surface, the outwardly impelled thrust member propels the `ball toy in a diiierent path, represented by dotted line 23, to dotted position 24. Should the ball toy not strike upon athrust member, resilient outer shell 1S gives the ball some bounce so that it moves upwardly to tall upon one of the thrust members after the next arc. Thus, it can be seen that the toy bail of the invention can assume a Variety of paths once it leaves a players hand. Successive bounces" may be ordinary ones caused by compression and expansion of the resilient outer shell or may be erratic under the inuence of an expelled thrust member.

One embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FlGS. 2, 3`vand 4. ln this embodiment a central hub 31, which may be cubical, supports a plurality of radial guides, of which ve 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 are shown in FIG. 2. Preferably the guides are tubular and house respectively tubular thrust members 43, 44, 45, 46 and 47.

The radial guides extend from ii'xed ends in faces Vof the hub to an outer shell 4S which may be spherical in configuration. The outer shell has an aperture 49 coin'- ciding with the positionof each radial guide. Each guide projects into an aperture and is lixed therein. Each radial `guidehas a transverse pin 51 extending across its diameter t 55 through which'the respective pin 51 extends so that. the thrust member is not precluded from motion by the pin. t

yA mounting pin 57 is supported in each thrust member `near end wall 53. Each mounting pin extends through the wall of the thrust member but does not protrude `therefrom and does not interfere with motion of the thrust Imember in the radial guide. Mounting pin 57 supports a latch spring 61 within thrust tube 43; Similar latch springs are supported within each' of'the thrust tubes of the illustrated embodiment, latch spring 64 being shown in thrust tube 46. v

A-s best shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, each latch spring has end loops 66, l67 connected by a central extent 63. yA spring leg '69, extends inwardly from each end'loop of 'spring 61 lat an angle to the wall of the thrust member to a spring foot. 71 which snaps into `one of a pair of annularV grooves 72, 73 in the mounting pin.

Each end loop of 'a latch spring resides within an aper- Y vture75 in the wall of the respective thrust member. The apertures extend through the thrust member wall so that the end loops may protrude and register against latch shoulders 77, 78 of the guide in the manner shown by dotted lines 79 in FIG. 3. In this position the thrust member is looked against the force of ya compression 3 spring lodged between transverse pin 51 and mounting pin 57 of each thrust member. In FIGS. 2 and 3 compression springs 81, S3 lare held between the pins of thrust members 43, 46 respectively. Spring 81 is compressed in locked position. Spring S3 is extended, expelling thrust member 46 outwardly beyond the outer shell.

The position of thrust member and springs, including latch spring 64 of radial guide 36 in FIG. 2 is the expelled position, occuring when a trigger such as'trigger SS shown with radial guide 33 is forced inwardly by trigger contact with a surface. The trigger is slidably held in wall 53 of the thrust member and extends inwardly to the central extent of the latch spring. The trigger may have a reduced diameter portion at its inner end 86, which protrudes through the central extent .of the latch spring so that trigger may be secured thereto by means of a conventional 'C-washer or a nut. In both the latched position and the extended position shown in FIG. 2 the central extent of the latch spring is not dellected. However, in FIGS. 3 and 4 the latch spring is displaced inwardly along the axis of the radial guide, causing the end loops to move out of engagement with latch shoulders 77, 78. The thrust member is therefore no longer locked and is expelled outwardly with resultant erratic motion of the toy. In FIG. 3 unlatching has just occurred as the knob 85A of the trigger is impacted yagainst surface 13. The thrust member is thus released to be rapidly expelled to the position of thrust member 46 in FIG. 2.

The distance each thrust member moves outwardly is limited by transverse pin 51 which is engaged by trailing end wall 55A of each slot 55 in each thrust member. Thus the extent of expulsion from the radial guide is determined by the length of limit slots 55.

The toy may be reloaded after one or more of the thrust members have been expelled by simple pressure against the end of the thrust member inwardly toward the hub. As the compression spring is compressed under the pressure the end loops slide inwardly within opposed relief recesses 91, 92 of the radial guide, and spring outwardly against the latch shoulders when the thrust member is sufficiently depressed. The toy is then once again ready to be thrown by a player.

Minor structural details may diifer as illustrated by radial guide assemblies 33 and 36 in FIG. 2. For instance the feet of the latch spring, instead of fitting into annular grooves of the mounting pin as shown with respect to spring 61, may slide in dovetail grooves cut on a chord as shown with respect to latch spring 64. The relief slots 91 and 92 need not extend through the wall of the radial guide as shown in FIG. 3, but may be merely shallow indentations 95, 96 as illustrated with respect to radial guide `46 in FIG. 2. If the guide is not pierced sealing is simplified for intlatable shells. Instead of a flat spring a round wire latch spring of some sutiicient diameter may be substituted.

A noise maker particularly `adapted to use with individual thrust members is illustrated in FIG. 2. One r more of the thrust members may be combined with a striker 1 extending across a diameter of the thrust member near its inner end. A tiexible reed 102, which may be partially imbedded in the central hub, is positioned so that outward movement of the thrust member carries the strike ragainst and past a closed outer loop 103 of the reed. As shown with respect to thrust member 46 (FIG. 2) the reed is thus caused -to vibrate and emit an audible signal.

Relative movement of striker and reed may be reversed, so that the reed is carried by the thrust member into contact with a static striker. The sound eiect may be intensified in an inflated toy due to the denser air medium transmitting sound to the outer shell. A simple striker and reed combination can be made to operate from motion of the trigger, rather than from motion of the thrust member, depending upon the instant of operation at which sound proves more amusing.

Other lsound means will be discussed further along in the specification.

A further embodiment of the invention is illustrated fragmentarily in FIG. 5. A toy ball 109' has a hollow central hub 110. A plurality of circular bosses 111 project above the surface of ythe hub itself. A guide 112, which may be tubular, is cemented or otherwise fastened about each boss 111 `and extends substantially radially from the hub to an outer shell 113. The outer shell has an annulus 114 to receive each guide. A compression spring 115 is housed within the guide and a thrust member 117 shown in expelled position.

The compression spring seats between boss 111 and a C-ring 118 xed within an annular recess 119 in the wall of the thrust member. The C-ring also serves as a mount for a latch spring 121 similar in its general coniiguration to the latch springs 61, 64 of vthe embodiment of FIG. 2. Latch spring 121 has end loops 66, 67 and central extent 68 connecting between the end loops. A leg 69 extends inwardly from each end loop to a foot 71 curled about the inner circle of the lC-ring to secure the latch spring thereto. A trigger 123 extends through end wall 53 of thrust member 117. The trigger is secured by suitable means such as a snap ring 125 to the center of the central extent of the latch spring.

The latch spring end loops extend through a pair of diametrically opposed apertures 75 in thrust member 117. In the expelled position of FIG. 5 the end loops of the latch spring extend through the apertures and engage diametrically opposed stop shoulders 127, 128 on the radial guide and thereby preclude further outward movement of the thrust member. When the thrust member is depressed once again within the radial guide the end loops of latch spring 121 engage latch shoulders 77, 7S in the same manner as described with respect to the embodiment of FIGS. 2 through 4. The embodiment of FIG. 5 has the advantage of eliminating transverse pin 51 from the assembly, thereby simplifying it. The radial guides and/'or the thrust members may have lightening holes, such as the holes 129 in the thrust members of FIG. 2. Lightened thrust members and radial guides plus the hollow central hub 110 shown in F-IG. 5 can combine to result in a very light-weight toy.

FIG. 6 illustrates an embodiment of the invention having extension springs in place of compression springs for expelling each thrust member. A central hub 133 mounts a plurality of radial guides of which only one guide 135 is shown. Radial guide V135 diiters from the guides of previously described embodiments in that it does not support or contact the outer shell 48. Rather, the shell is supported by a plurality of struts 133A extending radially outwardly from the hub. The struts may be cast integrally with the hub and the outer shell in two hemispheres. To simplify assembly, shell 48 has an annular inwardly protruding boss 136 for each radial guide. The inward bosses each slidably mount a tubular thrust member .137. The thrust member is open at its outer end and has a collar 138 at its inner end which makes sliding contact with the exterior of the radial guide. A spacing collar y139 on the outer end of the radial guide makes contact with the inner periphery of the thrust member. Collars .138 and I159 space the inner wall of the thrust member from the outer wall of the radial guide to form a volume in which a tension spring 1-41 resides. The tension spring is fastened at its inner end to the thrust member by a spring leg i142 extending through a hole 143 in the wall of the thrust member. A similar spring leg 144 extends through a vhole 145 in the radial guide near its outer end and secures that end of the extension spring to the radial guide.

It is thus apparent when the thrust member is depressed into the shell of the ball toy that spring 141 will be extended and thus exert an outward loading against the thrust member. To lock the thrust member in, iiat latch spring 147 is mounted in the radial guide. The latch one or more of g-uy wires-174.- With each change in direction or inertia of lthe toy the flexible wands bring a mounted in an outer end 157 of the guide and terminates; f

exteriorly in a hemispherical knob 158 threadably engaged with the outer end of the trigger. Threaded attachment permits assembly of the triggering such fashion as` lto-secure the trigger slidably to the radial guide.

The operation of the embodiment of FlG. 6 is similar to that previously ldescribed for the other embodiments. In the loaded position shown in FdG. 6 the `thrust *member is locked against expulsion by the latch spring. When theball toy is thrown or otherwise brought into contact with a surfacejand the trigger of a thrust member is impacted, the trigger is driven against the central portion of the latch spiingjpushing it inwardly` to cause withdrawal of the end loops from engagement 'with the latch shoulders'. When the latch spring is thus withdrawn the tension springs impels the thrust member outwardly, striking against the surface and moving thel ball toy from its thrown path. Reloading is accomplished by'depressing each red thrust member inwardly into the ball toy until the end loops of the latch spring once again engage the latch shoulders. The extent of the expulsion of the thrust member may be controlled by stop shoulders 159and 16i) formed by cuttingapertures in the outer wall of the thrust member at the point determined by the amount of the expulsion desired. The end loops of the latchspringengage the stop shoulders as the thrust member moves outwardly.

FIG. 7 illustrates an embodiment in which the centra hub and radial members are ucombined so that` an innatable outer shell may be used. yIn FIG. 7 a central hub may be a cube 171 supports a plurality of guides 172 extending an equal distance outwardly from the hub. The

striker head into contact with the guy wire, inducing an audible signal. The collars -175 to which the guy wires Yare attached are adjustable along the radial guides. VTherefore the musical pitch of the iwires can be controlled Y Within limits.

1t may be desirable to use a largerV number ofthrust members than shown Vin the embodiments thus far described. |In IFIG. 8 a ball :toy is shown having a multiplic'ity of thrust-members 201 protruding from an outer shell ,202 of a ball toy 203. tlf "of sufficient diameter such a ball toy may comprise thrust members and guides similar to those described. Eithercompression or extension springscan-be used to impel thrust member 201 outwardly from a central hub which is not shown. outer shell 202 may be either resilient plastic or an intlatable elastic material.

The converging multiplicity of radial guides in a -toy ball such as that illustrated in FIG. 8 raises a problem of space -at the central hub. The embodiment shown in hub is a cube, and six'guides are easily accommodated,

one extending from each facet of the cube. By using solids having differing numbersof facets, any number of radial guides and their associated thrust membersmay be incorporated linto the ball toy of the invention.

' Since an inflatable outer shell may not maintain the radial'alignment of theA guides, guy wire I174 extendsbetween adjacent `radial guides. A toy having six radial guides uses twelve guy wires: `The guy wires preferably are fastened to collars '1=75,located one vne-ar the'outere'nd of each guide. The collars may be slidablealong the guides and be locked in place thereon by a` set screw 176. Alternately the collars may be cemented or otherwise fastened in place after the desired tension is achieved in the guy wires. -Each guide contains a thrust member -177 similar in construction to thepreviously described embodiments. Aetrigger 178 extends from the end of each thrust member.

. An elastic inflatableskin I17'9 having a valve -181 extendingy through its wall is arranged about the radial guides and pneumatically sealed at the outer end of each guide Y to form an air ltight volume about the. g-uides and hub.

By means of the valve this volume may beinfllated to a desired resiliency. IThetoy ball of FIG. 7 is used similarly to the previously described embodiments.

The combination illustrated in FIG. 7 may be used without the inflatable skin 1,79'.V The guy wire construction maintains the radial orientation of all the thrust members so" that the structure may be used as previously described with respect to the spherical toys.

However, the action of the shell-less toy may not be as amusing since the number of bounces is limited by the lack of a resilient shell to Aprovide for a bounce between act-nations of the 4thrust members.

l The particular combination of FIG. 7 lends itself ideally to the creation of an'audible signalwith each movement FIG. 9 has an expulsion member common to all thrust members, greatly lessening theamount of apparatus converging `at the hub. InV FIG; 9 a ball toy 210 thas an outer shell 211 which may be either resilient or elastic,V and a hub cage 212. The cageis formed of -two hollow hemispheres 213, 214 joined along a line 215. Before the two hemispheres are joined 4a central compression member V217 is enclosedv within the cage. VCompression member 217 may be a solid ball of a material such as spongeV rubber or other suitable resilient materials, or may be an inflat- -abl-ebladder 219 as shownin FIG. l0. 'Ilhe cage 'has a plurality of equally spaced annuli`221 about its periphery. A tubular guide 222 -is fixed in each annulus by a suitable cement or` by means of pins (not shown). The radial guides may lhave lightening holes to reduce weight.

A transverse pin- 223 extendsdiametrically across each lguide near the juncture of the guide with Vthe cage. The

pin also` extends through an elongate limit slot 225' in each of a plurality of thrust members 227. Each thrust member is preferably tubular and slidably. mounted within a guide. The inner ends of both the guides and the thrust members are open.

The extent lof the thrust member within the guide is such that the thrust member may be depressed against vthe surface of compression member 217 from the exterior of the outer shell. An eniarged ange 229 on. the outer end of each thrust member .affords a larger surface for depressing the compression member and also affords a larger striking area for the thrust member to impinge upon the surface against which it is thrown.

'llhe thrust members 227 of FIG. 9 are shown in differing conditions. For instance, thrust members 227, 227A, 227B and 227B are shown in loaded. position, latched against expulsion by the compression member. Thrust members 227C, 227D, 227 F and 227Gare shown 4in tired or expelled position wherein transverse pin 223 iseng-aged by an end wall231 of limit slot 22S lof each of the expelled thrust members, as clearly illustrated with e respect -to thrust members 227 G in FIG. 9.

Each thrust member contains a C-ring 233 seated in an indentation .234 in the inner wall of the thrust member near the outer end thereof. 'The C-ring mounts a latch spring 236 similar in configuration to the latc'hspringof FIG. 5. The latch spr-ing of the embodiment of FIG. 9 Y

opera-tes in the same manner as the latch springs of the embodiments of the FIG. 2 through 4 and FIG.- 7. When thethrust member Vis depressed inwardly against compression member 217,end loops 66, 67 of the latch spring engagev latdh shoulders 77, 78 in the wall of the radial 'i guide. A trigger 23S in each thrust member has a tip 239 which bears against the central extent of the latch spring.

Y When an exterior boss 241 of thetrigger impacts against of `the toy. IFlexible wandsf'or reeds'183 may be sup- Y ported from the hub `so that a striker head 184 is adjacent a surface the central extent of the spring is-depressed, shortening the ydistance between end loops and thus with-V The arnese? drawing them from engagement with the stop shoulders. Once the latch spring is disengaged the compression member expels the unlocked thrust member outwardly into the position shown by thrust member 227G. The outward course of the thrust members is arrested as previously noted by the engagement of limit slot 225 with transverse pin 223. As in the previous embodiment the limit slot also preserves arcuate orientation of the .thrust member with the latch shoulders of the guide and the clearance slits 242, 243 in each guide. 'l'ihe slits provide frictionless travel of the latch spring loops along the radial guide as they protrude from apertures 245, 246 of the thrust member.

As can be seen in FIG. 9, particularly 'with respect to thrust member 227 G, the trigger 238 may be hollow. "['fhe diameter of the trigger wit-'hin the thrust member is larger than thrust member part 247 or protruding boss 241, so that the 4trigger is retained within the thrust member. The triggers therefore can obviously be assembled prior to the assembly of the latch spring and C-ring 233 within the thrust member. Assembly is facilitated in Ithe preferred embodiments by lightening holes such as the holes 248 in the walls yof the thrust members. As stated before the radial lguides may also contain lightening holes to reduce the over-all weight of the ball toy.

The embodiment of FIG. 9 may be combined with previously described apparatus to induce audible signals when a thrust member is expelled or when path of the thrown ball toy is appreci-ably altered.

Referring now to FIG. 10, a hollow hub cage 251 similar in general construction and configuration to hug cage 212 of the embodiment of FIG. 9 is shown disassociated from the rest of the ball toy. Cage '251 has a plurality of apertures 252 which receive radial guides (not shown) in similar fashion to the embodiment of FIG. 9.

The hub cage of FG. 10 is preferably of a single piece and may be formed by conventional processes. It may be combined with a compression member 4219 which is intlatable after insertion in the central hub or cage. The compression member or bladder 219 may be folded and inserted through one .of the apertures 252 and then oriented so that jan iniiating valve 253 of the bladder is accessible through one of the apertures.

An iniiatable compression member against which each of the thrust members of a particular ball toy may be Compressed is desirable in that the internal pressure of the compression member or bladder may be regulated to control the rate at which a thrust member is expelled along the guide. The embodiment of FIG. 9 diifers from the previously described embodiments in that the expelling force is not applied over the full extension of the thrust member. The common compression member 217 or alternate compression member 219 gives an initial thrust 4to a member which must be sufcient to totally expel the thrust member within Ithe limits set by the limit slot 225. Therefore, the inherent characteristics of the compression member used at the hub must be carefully chosen. While a sponge rubber ball is satisfactory it may be that under certain conditions .of thrust member extension a less compressible central ball such as a tennis ball may be more desirable.

The described embodiments illustrate a variety of ball toys within the scope `of the invention, all of which afford an amusing toy for use by players of all ages. The embodiment of FlG. 9 has the advantage of simplified construction and the capacity to impel a greater number of thrust members for a given diameter ball toy. Other variations and combinations of the elements disclosed may -occur to those skilled in the art. The scope of the invention however, is deiined by the following claims and not by the speciiic embodiments described.

I claim:

l. A ball toy comprising a hub, a pluralityl of guides extending outwardly from the hub, a thrust member movable along each guide, an outer shell enclosing the hub,

8 struts extending from the hub to the shell, apertures in the outer shell through which the thrust members project, a plurality of tension springs each fastened at one of its ends to a guide and at its opposite end -to a thrust member so that extension of the spring loads the thrust member to move away from the hub, a pair of latch shoulders in the thrust member, a latch spring supported by each guide and projecting beyond the periphery thereof and adapted to engage the latch shoulders of the thrust member, and a trigger mounted to move within the guide so as to bear'against a portion of the latch spring, said trigger extending outwardly beyond the outer shell so that trigger contact with a surface foreign to the .toy depresses the trigger so that the latch spring withdraws from engagement with the latch shoulders to leave the thrust member free to move through the shell in response to the extension of the tension spring.

2. A ball toy comprising a central hub, an outer shell surrounding the central hub, a plurality of guides extending between the hub and the shell, a plurality of tubular thrust members each movable axially within a guide, a first pin extending transversely through each of the guides and thrust members near the central hub, a second pin extending transvcrsely through each thrust member only intermediate the radial extent of fthe member, a compression spring lodged in each thrust member between the iirst and second pins so that relative movement of the guide and the thrust member changes the load condition of the spring, walls in each thrust member dening a slot engaging the first pin, a latch shoulder in each of the guides near the outer shell, a latch spring supported by each second pin of a thrust member, a central spring extent of each latch spring oriented transversely across a thrust member, a loop portion extending outwardly from each end of each central extent and thence backwardly to the second pin, apertures in each thrust member through which latch spring loops protrude to engage releasably the latch shoulders of each guide, and a trigger member extending from the end of each thrust member exteriorly of the outer shell, the inward end of each trigger being iixed to the central extent of the latch spring and adapted to depress the central extent of the spring and withdraw the loop portions thereof inwardly through thrust member apertures and out of engagement with the latch shoulder in the guides, rthereby permitting longitudinal movement of the thrust member along the guide and outwardly of the shell.

3. A ball toy comprising a central hub, an outer shell surrounding the central hub, a plurality of guides extending between the hub and the shell, the shell and the guides being joined, a plurality of tubular thrust members cach closed at its outer end and movable axially within the guide, a iirst pin extending transversely through each of the guides and thrust members near the central hub, a second pin extending transversely through each thrust member only intermediate the radial extent of the members, a compression spring lodged in each thrust member between the first and second pins so that relative movement of the guide and the thrust member changes the load condition of the spring, walls in each thrust member delining a slot engaging the first pin, a pair of latch shoulders in each of the guides near the outer shell, a latch spring in each member, spring mounting ends on each latch spring supported by the second pin of each thrust member, latch spring loops, apertures in the thrust member through which spring loops protrude to releasably engage the latch shoulders of each guide, a central spring extent between the spring loops and oriented transversely of each thrust member, a trigger member extending through the closed end of each thrust member cxteriorly of the outer shell, the inward end of each trigger being fixed lto the central extent of the latch spring and adapted to depress the central extent of the spring and withdraw the loop portions thereof inwardly through the thrust member apertures and out of engagement Iwith the latch shoulders in the guides, thereby permitting longitudinal ze A aldeas? movement of the thrust member .along the guide and out svardly of the shell, a tuned strip fired at one end to the central hub, Vand having its free end adjacent the thrust member, and a striker carriedby the inward end of the thrust member and adapted to strike the tuned strip to produce an audible signal as the thrust member moves along the guide.

4. Apparatus in accordance with claim 3 wherein the slot in each of the thrust members through which the tirst pin extends is ysuch that the inward wall of the slot strikes against the first pin to limit outward movement of the thrust member.

5. Apparatus in accordance with claim 3 in which second latch lshoulders on each guide between the iirst latch shoulders and the outer end of the guide are `adapted to engage the latch spring at the outer limit of thrust member travel Ito limit outward movement of the thrust member.

6. A ball toy comprising a hub, a plurality of guide tubes extending radially from the hub, a plurality of thrust members one within each guide tube,y means impelling each thrust member outwardly/,from the guide tube, latching means retaining each thrust member separately within the guide tubes, an impact sensitive trigger adapted to defeat the latching means of each thrustfmember'to permit outward propulsion of each thrust member as the trigger is struck, a plurality of collars fixed one to each guide tube remote from the central hub, a strut extending from a collar of each guide tube to the collar of each adjacent guide tube and adapted to maintain the radial aspect of each guide tube,` aplurality of i'lexible wands supported from the hub so that 4inertial changes of the toy cause the wands to bend and strike the struts to induce an audible signal, an intiatable outer shell hermetically sealed j to the outer ends of each of the guide tubes so that the thrust members and triggers are projectable beyond the outer shell, `and means for intiating the outer shell to make the -toy resilient.

7. Apparatus in accordance with claim 6 in which each 10 collar is adjustable along its guide tube to change the pitch of the struts attached to the collar.

8. A ball toy comprising an inner cage, a plurality of guides extending radially from Ithe interior of the cage, a resilient member held Within the cage, a guide pin extending across each of the guides near that end of the guide fixed to the inner cage, a thrust member movable along each guide, a guide slot in each of the thrust members through which the guide pin of each guide extends, a latch shoulder in each guide adjacent the outer end thereof, a trigger sl-idable axially with respect to each thrust member and projecting outwardly beyond the member, a mount xed in each thrust member intermediate its inner and outer ends, a latch spring seated on each mount, a thrust member laperture in each member through which a latch spring extends toengage the latch shoulder of each guide, each trigger being adapted to move against a latch spring in response to` inward pressure on the trigger .and distort the spring to withdraw the latch spring out of engagement with the latch shoulder, said resilient member being compressed by each thrust member as the member is thrust inwardly to engage the respective latch spring with the respective iatch shoulder, said compressed resilient member exerting an outward force against each thrust member when locked and adapted to project the thrust member outwardly of the shell when unlatched.

9. Apparatus in accordance with claim 8 'in which the resilient member within the cage is an inflatable member.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,627,700 weiss Feb. 1o, 1953 2,814,906 Orvis Dec. 3, 1957 FOREIGN PATENTS 126,863 Great Britain MayZZ, 1919 502,307 Germany July ll, 193() 1,184,170 France July 17, 1959

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3218071 *Apr 17, 1962Nov 16, 1965Richard Eugene DRebounding toy
US3229976 *Mar 25, 1963Jan 18, 1966Allen Jr Walter LIlluminated beach balls
US3262700 *Apr 7, 1964Jul 26, 1966Miller Albert FComic bowling ball
US3517912 *Nov 4, 1968Jun 30, 1970Foley Thomas PNon-lethal protective device
US3679212 *May 28, 1971Jul 25, 1972Smith James AChance readout educational ball
US3793765 *Nov 2, 1972Feb 26, 1974Raymond Lee Organization IncBouncing toy rocket
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Classifications
U.S. Classification473/571, 446/409, 473/595, 446/486, 446/437
International ClassificationA63B43/00, A63B43/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63B43/04
European ClassificationA63B43/04