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Publication numberUS3106754 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 15, 1963
Filing dateSep 26, 1960
Priority dateSep 26, 1960
Also published asDE1434223A1, DE1784903A1, DE1784903B2, DE1784903C3
Publication numberUS 3106754 A, US 3106754A, US-A-3106754, US3106754 A, US3106754A
InventorsAbraham Grossman
Original AssigneeAbraham Grossman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dual movable sash window
US 3106754 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 15, 1963 A. GROSSMAN DUAL MOVABLE SASH WINDOW Filed Sept. 26, 1960 4 M 0 0 w 0/0 2% r v f r v 4 T =a: k 0 )6 a M 8 fl A 3\ w C Ml!" m 2% mm k 4 r 4 a 2 4 h rt. 6 M Z 4, WM 4 a G 4 m 2 W TTOENEY United States Patent 3,106,754 DUAL MOVABLE SASH WKNDOW Abraham Grossman, 9339 Rhea Sh, Northridge, Calif. Filed Sept. 26, 196i), Ser. No. 58,229 4 Claims. (Cl. 20-52) This invention relates to a dual, movable sash window and, more particularly, to means for sealing said sash of said Window and the frame thereof against infiltration of air, moisture and dirt in a more effective manner than has been previously thought possible.

The principles of the invention, while illustrated as embodied in a double sliding sash horizontal window are, as will be obvious to those skilled in the art, applicable with equal cogency to doors incorporating dual sliding sash of the same general construction as the sliding sash incorporated in the window disclosed hereinbelow.

One of the greatest problems encountered in the effective operation of dual sliding sash windows is the infiltr' tion of air, dirt and moisture between the overlapping stiles of the sash and between the lower rails of the sash. It is, therefore, an object of my invention to provide a window incorporating dual sliding sash in a horizontal frame which is characterized by the provision of a complete seal between the interlocking stiles on said sash so that the infiltration of air, dirt and moisture at the extremities of said interlocking stiles is prevented.

It is customary, in windows of the aforementioned character, to provide the interlocking stiles of the sliding sash with clearance openings or cuts at the upper and lower extremities of the interlocking portions of the stiles so that the sash may be readily removed from or installed in the inner and outer channels of the window frame. The clearance openings or cuts in the opposite extremities of the interlocking portions of the stiles are adapted to receive the intermediate wall between the inner and outer channels of the frame when the sash are installed in or removed from the frame.

In prior art constructions no effective seal for these clearance openings has been provided and, therefore, the clearance openings have constituted passageways at the upper and lower extremities of the overlapping stiles of the sliding sash for the infiltration of dirt, moisture and air into the room where the window is installed.

It is, therefore, another object of my invention to provide a continuous Weatherstrip between the overlapping stiles of the sliding sash which extends from one extremity to the other of one of the interlocking stiles and which thus covers the clearance openings in the upper and lower extremities of the interlocking portions of said stiles. Therefore, the infiltration of air, dirt and moisture through said openings is prevented.

Another of the major problems encountered in horizontal sliding windows is the drainage of moisture from the inner channel of the sill portion of the window frame since, during rainy weather or during periods of high humidity or fog, considerable quantities of moisture accumulate in the inner channel. The customary expedient utilized to cope with this problem is the provision of a plurality of drainage openings in the outer wall of the inner channel which permits moisture to drain into the outer channel and from said outer channel into drain openings communicating with the exterior of the building in which the Window is installed.

Unfortunately, it has been discovered that the drain openings in the outer wall of the inner channel constitute passageways for the infiltration of air, dirt and moisture into the room with which the window is associated and thus, while permitting drainage of moisture, the openings also serve to create draft and dirt problems.

It is a further object of my invention to provide a window having a frame incorporating drainage openings from the inner channel similar to those provided in conventional window frame constructions. To prevent the infiltration of air and dirt into the room, I provide an auxiliary Weatherstrip which overlies the upper extremities of the drainage openings and which, while permitting the efilux of moisture from the inner channel, prevents the ingress of air and dirt into the inner channel and thus into the interior of the room with which the window is associated.

A further object of my invention is the provision of a window of the aforementioned character wherein the elongated wheatherstrip associated with said drain openings incorporates a plurality of filamentary bodies, said filamentary bodies serving, by capillary action, to induce the efilux of moisture collecting in the inner channel through the drain openings.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following specification and the accompanying drawing, which is for the purpose of illustration only and in which:

FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of a window constructed in accordance with the teachings of my invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged, vertical, fragmentary sectional view showing related portions of the inner and outer sliding sashes;

FIG. 3 is a transverse sectional view taken on the broken line 3-3 of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 4 is a vertical sectional view taken on the broken line 44- of PEG. 1. 7

Referring to the drawing and particularly to FIGS. 1, 2 and 4 thereof, I show a window 10 constructed in accordance with the teachings of my invention, said window including a frame 1?. which is constituted by a head 14, a sill l6 and jarnbs 18 and 2h. The head 14, sill 16 and jarnbs l8 and 2d are maintained in operative relationship with each other by a steel strap 21, this particular construction being disclosed in my copending applications for United States Letters Patent, Serial No. 44,493, filed July 21, 1960, entitled Window Frame Construction and Serial No. 44,496, filed July 21, 1960, entitled Method of Fabricating Window Frames.

The various components of the frame 12 are fabricated from extrusion shapes of identical configuration which, in the case of the sill 16, includes an inner channel 22 separated from an outer channel 24 by an intermediate wall 26. The head 14 is, of course, constituted by an extrusion of the same shape as the sill 16 including an inner channel 22, an outer channel 24 and the intermediate wall 26 therebetween.

An inner track 32 is disposed in the inner channel 22 and an outer track 34 is disposed in the outer channel 24 in the sill 16. The construction and function of the tracks 32 and 34 will be described in greater detail hereinbelow.

It will be noted that the intermediate wall '26, as best shown in FIGS. 2 and 3 of the drawings, incorporates drainage openings 36 adapted to drain moisture accumulating in the inner channel 22 into the outer channel 24- which has an elongated receptacle 38 in communication therewith. The wall of the elongated receptacle 38 is provided with a plurality of punch-outs 42 defining drain openings 43- to the exterior of the building in which the window 10 is installed. Therefore, the flow of moisture from the inner channel 22 through the drain openings 36 and through the elongated receptacle 38 to the drain openings 43 is as indicated by the series of arrows 44 in FIG. 2 of the drawing.

It should be pointed out that the opposite extremities of the outer track 34 terminate, as best shown in FIG. 1 of the drawing, inwardly of the extremities of the sill 16 and the outer channel 24. Therefore, the flow of moisu ture actually follows a path from the drain openings 36 in the intermediate wall 26 along the adjacent surface of the track 34 to the opposite extremities of the track and thence through the drain openings 43 communicating with the receptacle 38.

Mounted for movement on the inner track 32 within the inner channel 22 of the sill 16 and the corresponding inner channel 22 of the head 14 is an inner sliding sash 50, said inner sliding sash including upper and lower rails 52 and 54, respectively, joined in operative relationship with each other by stiles 56 and 58, respectively. The rails 52 and 54 and the stiles 56 and 58 encompass a pane 62 of glass and rollers 64 mounted in the lower rail 54 of the movable sash 50 supporting the movable sash 50 upon the inner track 32.

The stile 58 of the inner sliding sash 50 is an interlocking stile, that is, it is provided with an interlocking portion or flange 68, as best shown in FIG. 3 of the drawing. The interlocking flange is provided with clearance openings or cuts 72 and 74 at its upper and lower extremities, as best shown in FIG. 4 of the drawing, said clearance openings being adapted to permit the movable sash 50 to be inserted in the frame 12 by clearing the intermediate wall 26 between the inner and outer channels 22 and 24, respectively, of the head 14- and the sill 16. A handle 76 is secured to the stile 58 of the inner movable sash 50 and, when grasped, permits said sash to he slid back and forth on the associated track 32.

An outer movable sash 88 is mounted for movement on the track 34 located in the outer channel 24 and includes top and bottom rails 82 and 84, respectively, and stiles 86 and 88. The bottom rail 84 includes rollers 94 engageable with the track 34 andadapted to facilitate the free sliding movement of the outer sash Si) upon said track. The stile 88 of the movable sash 35 adapted to overlie the corresponding stile 58 of the inner, movable sash is of the same configuration as the stile 58 and includes an interlocking flange 98 adapted to engage the corresponding interlocking flange 68 on the stile 58 of the inner movable sash 50.

The upper and lower extremities of the interlocking flange 98 are cut away, as best shown in FIG. 4 of the drawing, to provide clearance openings 192 and 104 at the upper and lower extremities of the stile 58, thus permitting the outer movable sash 8G to be installed in operative association with the frame 12 by clearing the intermediate walls 26 between the inner and outer channels 22 and 24 of the head 14 and the sill 16.

Mounted in an elongated vertical receptacle 110 in the stile 88 of the outer movable sash 8%, as best shown in FIG. 3 of the drawing, is a continuous Weatherstrip 129 which, as best shown in FIG. 4 of the drawing, extends from the top to the bottom of the stile 88 and thus overlies and seals off the clearance openings 72 and 74 in the stile 58 and the clearance openings 162 and 164 in the stile 88. Therefore, the infiltration of dirt and moisture and air through the clearance openings, which occurs in prior art constructions, is not encountered in the present construction. This is attributable to the fact that the elongated Weatherstrip 120 is disposed on the stile 38 of the outer movable sash 8G outwardly of the interlocking flanges 68 and, thus, acts as a barrier to prevent the bypassing of air through the clearance openings in the upper and lower extremities of said flanges.

It will, of course, be noted that both the upper and lower rails of the inner and outer movable sashes t) and 80 are provided with elongated weatherstrips 124 which engage adjacent areas of the intermediate Wall 26 and serve to restrict the infiltration of air and moisture and dirt past said wall.

It will be noted that the inner track 32 and the outer track 34 are contsituted by plastic extrusions which are snapped into the inner channel 22 and the outer channel 24, respectively. However, of course, it is not intended to limit the teachings of the invention to any particular type of track since it is obvious that the extrusion constituting the sill 16 may be provided with integral track or other alternative expedients.

In any event, the elongated outer track 34 has a continuous Weatherstrip 13% mounted thereupon which is formed from mohair or other filamentary material and which, as best shown in FIG. 2 of the drawing, extends along the base of the intermediate wall 26 and overlies the drain openings 36 in the bottom of said wall. There fore, the elongated Weatherstrip acts as a barrier against the infiltration of air and dirt through the drain openings 36 into the interior of the room in which the window it is located.

Moreover, the filaments constituting the Weatherstrip 130 serve, by capillarity, to induce the outward flow of moisture collected in the inner channel 22 through the drain openings 36. Therefore, in addition to serving as a barrier against drafts and dirt infiltration, the elongated Weatherstrip 13% also serves to induce the effiux of collected moisture from the interior of the inner channel 22.

Because of the provision of the continuous weatherstrips 12% and 130, a dual sash sliding window characterized by resistance to infiltration of'air, dirt and mois ture is attained. The leakage characteristic of prior art constructions is completely eliminated and the self-draining characteristics enhanced by the provision of the elongated weatherstrip in the outer channel in overlying relationship with the drain openings from the inner channel.

I claim:

1. In a window construction, the combination of: a frame having a head and sill each incorporating outer walls and one intermediate wall defining inner and outer channels, said siil having inner and outer tracks, respectively, in said inner and outer channels; an inner sash slidable on said inner track, said inner sash having a rst interlocking stile having an interlocking portion thereupon; an outer sash slidable on said outer track, said outer sash having a second interlocking stile having an interlocking portion thereupon interengageable with said interlocking portion on said inner sash, said interlocking portions having clearance openings therein at the opposite extremities thereof for said intermediate Walls; an elongated Weatherstrip receptacle in one of said stiles disposed externally of the interlocking portion thereof; and vertical Weatherstrip means mounted in said receptacle and closing said openings immediately adjacent said intermediate wall.

In a window construction, the combination of: a frame having a head and sill each incorporating outer walls and one intermediate wall defining inner and outer channels, said sill having inner and outer tracks, respectively, in said inner and outer channels; an inner sash slidable on said inner track, said inner sash having a first interlocking stile having an interlocking portion thereupon; an outer sash slidable on said outer track, said outer sash having a second interlocking stile having an interlocking portion thereupon interengageable with said interlocking portion on said inner sash, said interlocking portions having clearance openings therein for said intermediate wall; an elongated Weatherstrip receptacle in one of said stiles disposed externally of the interlocking portion thereof; and vertical Weatherstrip means mounted in said receptacle and closing said openings immediately adjacent said intermediate wall, said Weatherstrip means extending from the top to the bottom of the associated stiles, the upper and lower extremities of said Weatherstrip closing said openings and projecting transversely of said openings to engage a corresponding surface of said other stile.

3. In a horizontal window construction, the combination of: a frame having a head and a sill, said sill having inner and outer channels, respectively, incorporating inner and outer tracks, said inner channel having drain openings therein; an inner sash slidable on said inner track; an outer sash slidable on said outer track; a Weatherstrip receptacle formed in the inner portion of said outer track below the top of said track; and a horizontal Weatherstrip in said receptacle covering said drain openings, said Weatherstrip being constituted by an elongated body having a plurality of filamentary elements covering said drain openings.

4. In a sliding window construction, the combination of: a frame having a head and a sill each having an inner and outer channel incorporating inner and outer tracks, said inner channel of said sill having drain openings therein; an inner sash slidable on said inner track having a stile with a first interlock thereupon; an outer sash slidable on said outer track having a stile with a second interlock thereupon engageable with 15 an elongated vertical Weatherstrip receptacle in one of said stiles disposed externally of the interlocks on said stiles; Weatherstrip means in said vertical receptacle overlying said openings in said interlocks; a horizontal Weatherstrip receptacle formed in the inner portion of said outer track below the top of said track; and a horizontal Weatherstrip in said horizontal receptacle overlying said drairi openings.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,733,487 Hauck Feb. 7, 1956 2,787,034 Hauck Apr. 2, 1957 2,895,182 Evans July 21, 1959 2,917,792 Franzblau et a1 Dec. 22, 1959 2,950,756 Moloney Aug. 30, 1960

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2733487 *Mar 16, 1953Feb 7, 1956 Hauck
US2787034 *May 6, 1953Apr 2, 1957Gen Bronze CorpMetallic window sill
US2895182 *Apr 22, 1954Jul 21, 1959Reynolds Metals CoWindow structure
US2917792 *Aug 17, 1956Dec 22, 1959Franzblau AbrahamWindow construction
US2950756 *Jun 13, 1957Aug 30, 1960Paul S MoloneySliding glass doors
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3225393 *Apr 10, 1963Dec 28, 1965Fuller TrimviewPanel structure
US3315414 *Dec 4, 1963Apr 25, 1967Reynolds Metals CoEdgewise movable wall closure construction and method of making the same
US3325944 *Jun 23, 1965Jun 20, 1967Allen Stevens CorpWindow sealing device
US3359688 *Jun 11, 1965Dec 26, 1967Schlegel Mfg CoWindow glass engaging device
US3584417 *Mar 17, 1969Jun 15, 1971Streater Ind IncRemovable sliding-door track
US3859754 *Aug 31, 1972Jan 14, 1975Dynamit Nobel AgExtruded profile members, particularly of a thermoplastic synthetic material, for blind frames and sashes of sash windows, sliding doors, or the like
US3903650 *Jun 24, 1971Sep 9, 1975Nanco CorpNatural wood gliding window
US3946524 *Feb 25, 1974Mar 30, 1976Dynamit Nobel AgBlind frame and sash constructions for sash windows, sliding doors, and the like
US4042004 *Oct 22, 1976Aug 16, 1977Hehr International Inc.Window assembly
US4047333 *Apr 27, 1976Sep 13, 1977Rusco Industries, Inc.Snap-in keeper for sliding windows, doors and the like
US4187642 *May 31, 1978Feb 12, 1980Toyo Kogyo Co., Ltd.Weather-tight seal structures for automobile windows
US4219971 *Apr 3, 1978Sep 2, 1980Curtis MauronerPocket window
US4967507 *May 12, 1989Nov 6, 1990Charles Visnic Aluminum, Inc.Window frame
US5551196 *Jun 17, 1993Sep 3, 1996Rylock Company Ltd.Window assembly having dead air spaces formed by non conductive members
US6820371 *Nov 2, 2000Nov 23, 2004Ki-Young ParkHidden rail type window and door system
US7574829 *Feb 5, 2007Aug 18, 2009Melvin PragerApparatus for draining rain water from window tracks during high winds
US8001743 *Aug 27, 2007Aug 23, 2011Gsg International S.P.A.Accessory for profiles for sliding windows or doors
US20100242365 *Aug 29, 2008Sep 30, 2010Aneeta Window Systems (Vic) Pty LtdSliding windows, doors and the like
Classifications
U.S. Classification49/408, 49/425, 49/489.1
International ClassificationB21H9/00, B21H9/02, E06B3/32, E06B3/46
Cooperative ClassificationE06B3/4609, B21H9/02
European ClassificationB21H9/02, E06B3/46B