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Publication numberUS3107353 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 15, 1963
Filing dateJun 1, 1961
Priority dateJun 1, 1961
Publication numberUS 3107353 A, US 3107353A, US-A-3107353, US3107353 A, US3107353A
InventorsFox James C
Original AssigneeDorothy Smith
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Folding antenna
US 3107353 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 15, 1963 .1. c. FOX 3,107,353

FOLDING ANTENNA Filed June 1. 1961 IN VEN TOR. JHMES L. FUX

United States Patent Ofiice 3,107,353 Patented Oct. 15, 1963 3,107,353 FOLDlNG ANTENNA James C. Fox, Oklaunion, Tern, assignor to Dorothy Smith, @klaunion, Tex. Filed .lnne 1, 1961, Ser. No. 114,07

3 Claims. (Cl. 34381) This invention relates to folding antennae such as used in connection with television and the like, and more particularly to folding dipole antennae wherein the arms thereof may extend outward longitudinally and spread apart when in use, or they may be folded in side by side relation, and then moved into a position substantially parallel to the supporting pole, and further, the folded antennae may be lowered to the lower-most point on the support pole to obviate the dangers and hazards incident to storms. The folding of the antennae into compact form also enables ready transport, shipping or storage thereof.

Various knock-down antennae have been proposed heretofore, but these, for the most part, lacked the overall flexibility of an antennae which may be quickly set up and moved into position on a support post for receiving electronic waves such as used in television receivers and the like.

An object of this invention is to provide collapsible dipole antennae which may be readily set up and which may be moved into receiving position when desired, and which may be readily lowered in event of storms or the like, to obviate damage thereto.

Another object of the invention is to provide a collapsible television antennae which, when in extended and raised position, will receive electronic television signals, and which may be readily lowered and folded into a compact space for storage and/ or shipping.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a dipole antennae which is simple in construction, effective in receiving electronic waves for television and the like, and which is low in the cost of manufacture, and which may be readily set up or taken down in a minimum of time.

With these objects in mind and others which will become manifest as the description proceeds, reference is to be had to the accompanying drawings in which like reference characters designate like parts in the several views thereof, in which:

FIG. 1 is an elevational view of the dipole antennae and the upper portion of a support member with the dipole antennae arms positioned in vertical planes in side by side relation to the support member, but with the arms spread apart and showing portions of the support member broken away, and showing guy wires extending therefrom;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the upper portion of the support member, showing the dipole antennae arms spread apart and extending horizontally outward, and showing a diagrammatic wiring diagram connected thereto;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary, elevational view of the lower dipole antennae, showing the arms folded in side by side relation on the support element, with the arms collapsed in side by side parallel relation;

HS. 4 is an enlarged sectional view of one of the guide collars taken on the line 44 of FIG. 2, looking in the direction indicated by the arrows;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view showing a dipole raising arm brace, with a portion of the dipole arm shown there- FIG. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary, elevational view taken longitudinally through the dipole arm mounting bracket, showing the dipole arms in one position in full outline, another position thereof being shown in dashed outline;

7 is an enlarged, fragmentary, perspective view of the dipole arms mounting bracket which is hingeably secured to a stationary mounting collar on a tubular sleeve which is slidably mounted on an upright support member, and showing parts broken away and parts being shown in section to bring out the details of construction, and showing the dipole arms both in full outline and in dashed outline to indicate alternate positions which the arms may occupy; and

FIG. 8 is an enlarged, fragmentary detail view of a hinge joint between the arm support member and the antennae arm support member, showing the insulation therebetween;

With more detailed reference to the drawing, the numeral 1 designates generally a standard or support member such as a pipe mounted in the ground and extending upward and having guy wires 2 attached to lugs 4 at the upper end thereof. One of the lugs 4 is apertured to receive a book 5 or the like of block 6, which block is of the type that has a sheave therein to receive a rope 8 therethrough to form a block and tackle arrangement, as will be more fully brought out hereinafter.

The present dipole antennae may be made either in single or in multiple units depending on the set to which it is to be attached, and the particular distance over which electronic waves are received. An elongated tubular sleeve 16 is slidably fitted on upright member 1, and is shown to have two sets of folding dipole arms. However, in some instances, only one set of arms is necessary, in which case the sleeve It? could accordingly be made much shorter, to receive only one set of dipole arms thereon.

The elongated sleeve ill has dipole arm support member designated generally at 12, mounted on and secured to the upper end thereof, and a similar dipole antennae support member 14 mounted on and secured to the elongated sleeve lil), a spaced distance downward from dipole support member 12, the construction of which members 12 and 14 is best seen in FIG. 7. The dipole arm support members 12 and 14 each has a tubular insulating element 15 therein, as will best be seen in FIG. 7, so that the members 22 and 14 may be anchored in secure relation to the elongated tubular sleeve 19 by means of set screws 13, which set screws 18 press the insulation element 16 inward against the sleeve 1% which surrounds the upright support member 1. When two or more dipole units are used, one above the other, such as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 these are connected together on sleeve 10 in such manner as to give simultaneous operation, when raising the antennae from the ground level to the uppermost end of upright support member 1, as will be more fully brought out hereinafter.

The dipole arm support members 12 and 14 each have an outer cylindrical portion 20-, with pairs of lugs 22 extending therefrom in opposite directions, which lugs are apertured, as indicated at 24-, to receive insulation bushings 25 therein and bolts 26 therethrough, which bolts are adapted to pass through holes 28 in the respective pairs of lugs 30 on the dipole arm support member, designated generally by the numeral 32.

It is preferable to have the dipole arm support members 12 and 14 made of dielectric material to avoid the necessity of having to insulate the dipole arm support members 32 with insulating bushings and washers, as shown in FIG. 8. However, when the antennae arm support members 12 and 14 are made of metal or other conductor material, the arm support members 32 are insulated therefrom by bushings and washers '25 of insulating material,

as shownin FIG. 8. The same results are obtained as if the members 12 and ldwere made of dielectric material.

The dipole arm support members 32 are constructed with the respective dipole arms 34- and 36 connected to an upper plate 38, each by bolts 4b. The dipole arm support members 32 each have upturned, apertured lugs, which apertures are adapted to receive bolts 4-: therethrough which bolts also extend through lugs 37 on hinge plate 38 so that the hinge plate 33 hinges upward to the position as shown in full outline in FIG. 6, as the plate 38 pivots about bolt 44, which will enable the dipole arms 34 to be moved above dividing lugs 4s, from the position as shown in full outline in FIGS. 6 and 7, to that shown in dashed outline therein, upon moving bolt -3 into the enlarged portion of keyhole slot 50, the bolt will drop downward to enable dipole arms 34 to be passed thereover, and into side by side relation with dipole arms 36, whereupon, the bolt 48 may be moved back into the narrow portion of keyhole slot 50, and the wing nut 49 tightened to hold the dipole arms 34 in close fitting relation between plate 33 and the bottom 33 of dipole arm support member 32.

Insulated, slidable sleeve members 52 and 54- are slida-bly mounted on elongated sleeve it below the respective members 12 and 14, which slida ble sleeve members each have lugs 56 thereon to pivotally mount braces 58 for movement about pivot bolts 66. The upper end of the braces 53 are apertured and are pivotally connected to a sleeve member 62 by bolts 64, which bolts pass through the aperture in the respective braces 52 and the aperture within each of the lugs 66 of the sleeve 62. Each of the sleeves 62 has an insulating member 63 therein as will best be seen in FIG. 5, which insulating member is preferably in the form of a sleeve, with the bore thereof sufiiciently large to permit the sliding of the sleeve on the respective dipole elements 36.

The rope 8 of the block and tackle 6 is attached at one end to an eye 70 secured to the upper end of elongated sleeve and which rope 8 is of sufficient length that the elongated sleeve 10 may be lowered downward on the upright support member 1 to a point near the lower end thereof, which sleeve is so constructed that the dipole antennae arms 34 and 36 may be lowered, by rope 8, either in outwardly extended position, as shown in FIG. 2, which arrangement enables the quick and ready manipulation of the antennae to avoid danger of damage or destruction by high winds or the like, or, by loosening rope 72, slidable sleeve members 52 and 54, which are connected by link 80, the arms 34 and 56 may be lowered into the position as shown in FIG. 1. By lowering the dipole arms from horizontal position to a substantially vertical position, as shown in FIG. 1, damage to the dipole arms during high winds can usually be avoided. Upon lowering the dipole arms 34 and 36 on pole l to a lowermost position thereon, it is possible to loosen the wing nuts 49, thereby the dipole arms may be moved from the I position as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, into the position as shown in FIG. 7, in dashed outline, and in FIG. 3 in an outline.

To move the dipole arms from the position as shown in FIG. 2. to that shown in FIG. 1, a block and tackle arrangement, comprising a rope 72, and a pulley 74 having a sheave therein, is so mounted that the pulley '74- is supported on an eye 76 intermediate the length of the elongated sleeve 10, and with an end of rope 72 connected to an eye 78 of the slidable sleeve member 54, the lowermost set of dipole arms 34 and as, which are hingeably connected to dipole arm support member 14, may be lowered into the position as shown in FIGS. 1 and 3, and simul taneously with the lowering of the lowermost dipole arms, a connecting link 86, wluch extends between lugs 82 and 84 on the respective slidable members 52 and 54-, will automatically lower the uppermost set of dipole arms 34 and 36. In this manner, it can be readily understood that only three operations are necessary to lower the dipole arms from the position as shown in FIG. 2, to that shown in FIG. 3, whereupon, the dipole arms are relatively safe from the danger .of storms.

A dipole unit comprises either a single set of arms, such as shown in FIG. 3, or two or more sets of arms, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, which arms may be folded in side by side relation on sleeve 1% for storage, or for shipment. In this manner a complete antenna can be smpped ready for installment on a pole without requiring skilled technicians to come to the site of the installation to assemble the various parts preparatory to erection.

While guy wires 2 have been shown at the top of pole 1, it is to be understood that these are required only on poles of high slenderness ratio which could not otherwise withstand the prevailing wind pressure.

raving thus clearly shown and described the invention, what is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. An antenna comprising an upright standard, a first sleeve sli'dably mounted on said upright standard, two sets of first arms pivotally mounted on said first sleeve in opposed relation, to pivot about horizontal axes, means insulating said respective sets of first arms from each other, a second sleeve mounted on said first sleeve and being slidable thereon, a first pair of braces, one end of each first pair of braces being pivotally connected 1n opposed relation to said second sleeve at the respective lower ends of said braces, which braces extend upward-1y and pivotally connect to the respective first sets of arms and being insulated therefrom, a second two sets of arms pivotally mounted on said first sleeve in opposed relation a longitudinal spaced distance from said first two sets of arms, which said second sets of arms pivot about horizontal axes, means insulating said respective second sets of arms irom each other and from said respective first sets of arms, a third sleeve mounted on said first sleeve a spaced longitudinal distance firom said second sleeve and being slidable on said first sleeve, a second pair of braces, the lower end of each second brace being pivotally connected in opposed relation to said third sleeve, which second braces extend upwardly and pivotally connect with said second respective sets of arms and being insulated therefrom, a pulley mounted near the upper end of said upright standard, a rope passing through said pulley and being connected to said first sleeve for moving said first sleeve longitudinally of said standard, linkage means interconnecting said second sleeve and said third sleeve, a pulley mounted on said first sleeve, a rope passing through said pulley and being connected to one of said slidable sleeves so as to move said sets of arms about their respective honizontal axes.

2. An antenna as defined in claim 1; wherein said arms are further pivoted on an axis at right angles to the horizontal axis of the first mentioned pivot, the axis of which further pivot is transverse to a plane which passes longitudinally through said standard to enable said arms to be moved into substantially parallel relation with the axis of said upright standard when said arms are in one position.

3. An antenna comprising an upright standard, a first sleeve fitted on said standard, means selectively securing said first sleeve against longitudinal movement with respect to said upright standard, two sets of arms pivo-tally mounted in opposed relation on said first sleeve, means insulating said respective sets of arms from each other, a second sleeve mounted on said first sleeve and being slidable thereon, a pair of braces, one end of each brace being pivotally connected in opposed relation to said second sleeve, which braces extend upwardly and pivotally connect, at the upper ends thereof, to said respective sets of arms and being insulated therefrom, a pulley secured to said first sleeve above said second sleeve, a rope passing through said pulley and having one end thereof connected to said second sleeve to move said arms about their respective pivot points on said first 5 mentioned sleeve, a second antenna arrangement complementally mounted on said first sleeve, which second antenna has substantially the same component parts as said first antenna, means interconnecting said second sleeve of said first antenna and said second sleeve on said second antenna, so when said second sleeve on either antenna is moved on said first sleeve, the arms of (the complementary antenna are moved in coordinated relation with respect to the arms of said first mentioned antenna.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2433369 *Jul 24, 1942Dec 30, 1947Standard Telephones Cables LtdAntenna system and method of using same
US2535049 *Nov 14, 1945Dec 26, 1950Standard Telephones Cables LtdAntenna structure
US2932028 *Jan 5, 1959Apr 5, 1960Saul Sr Francis KCollapsible antenna
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3228031 *Dec 18, 1963Jan 4, 1966Sony CorpDipole antenna with movable reflector all supported by coaxial cable
US3860932 *Feb 1, 1974Jan 14, 1975Hochbrueckner Martin ATelevision antenna for motor home with collapsible support
US4249185 *Apr 16, 1979Feb 3, 1981Cesari Robert J DePortable, collapsible cubical quad antenna
US8902121 *Jun 20, 2012Dec 2, 2014The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyPortable field antenna
Classifications
U.S. Classification343/881, 343/805
International ClassificationH01Q1/08
Cooperative ClassificationH01Q1/08
European ClassificationH01Q1/08