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Publication numberUS3107356 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 22, 1963
Filing dateAug 31, 1960
Priority dateAug 31, 1960
Publication numberUS 3107356 A, US 3107356A, US-A-3107356, US3107356 A, US3107356A
InventorsEugene Mauro, Pestronk Saul M
Original AssigneePost Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Headgear
US 3107356 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

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nm@ KV el 55mm 6 9 T7701? NEYS Patented Oct. 22, 1963 3,197,356 HEADGEAR Saul M. Pestronk, Armonk, and Eugene Mauro, Brooklyn, N.Y., assignors to Post Manufacturing Co., New York, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed Aug. 31, 196i), Ser. No. 53,121 6 Claims. (Cl. 2 3) This invention relates to headgear, and more particularly to protective headgear worn by people engaged in dangerous occupations or sports. Such headgear, or helmets, are usually formed of la hard, substantially inflexible material, such as any one of the well known fiber lor plastic-base materials, molded into a predetermined head size and basic shape, i.e., narrow, oval, or substantially round.

Because of its inflexibility, a single such helmet is limited to comfortable use by one person or but a very few of any group of people. To compensate for this, linings which are soft and thick so as as to be highly compressible have been used in the helmets; or interchangeable linings lhave been provided. Alternatively, rigidity has been sacrificed lto pr-ovide some flexibility. In any event, no satisfactory construction -or arrangement has been advanced heretofore to provide a single helmet adapted to t comfortably .on a great variety of different head sizes and shapes.

It is an object of the present invention, therefore, to obviate the foregoing `disadvantages `and provide -a headgear or helmet constructed to adapt itself to many different head sizes and shapes.

Another object of the invention is to provide a headgear of such character without sacrificing its rigidity or other protective features.

It is also an object of the invention to apply it to existing forms of headgear so as to `avo-id a material change inthe method, means or cost of manufacturing the headgear.

That the present invention attains these and other objects will be apparent -to those skilled in the art from the disclosure which follows.

In its broad aspects, the present invention contemplates a headgear having a crown portion which is hard and substantially inflexible, but which is expansible from a predetermined size and shape through any number of larger sizes within the limits of its expansibility, its expansion adapting it to a varie-ty of different head shapes.

More specically, the invention provides a headgear having a crown formed of har-d, substantially inflexible material shaped to cover the top land that area of the head extending labove the fore and aft line of the eyes and ears of the wearer, the crown being severed along a median line `from its front edge rearward to a point near its rear edge, and the two portions formed by the severeance being connected -by expansion means, such as a strip of elastic rubber under slight tension normally to hold the crown in its smallest size yet permitting a relative separation movement of the severed crown portions to any size within the limit of maximum expansion. f In the accompanying drawings, the invention has been shown merely by way of example and in preferred form, and obviously many variations and modications thereof may be made which will still be comprised within its spirit. It is to be understood, therefore, that the invention is not limited to any particular form for embodiment, or mode of application, except insofar as such limitations are set forth in the appended claims.

Referring to the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a side eleva-tion of the headgear of the present invention, partly broken away to show the construction;

FIG. 2 is a front elevation of said headgear;

FIG. 3 is ea top plan view of said headgear;

FIG. 4 is a bottom plan view of said headgear;

FIG. 5 is a rear elevation of said headgear, partly broken away to show the construction;

FIG. 6 is a top plan View, showing said headgear in expanded condition;

FIG. 7 is a top plan View, showing a modification of the invention; and

FIG. 8 is a top plan View, showing another modification of the invention.

. In FIGS. 1 to 6, there isshown a headgear or hehnet 10 comprising a crown 11 Ito which are attached cupped ear coverings 12 having rearwardly extending straps 13 which overlap and are fastened together and to the crown 11, as by rivets 14, to form a protective covering for the base of the skull. As best shown in FIGS. 1, 4 and 5, the interior of the headgear 10 has a thick strip of lining 15, made of foam rubber or other soft, highly compressible material arranged lall along the area bordering its free edge; and a similar strip of lining 16 is arranged along the area bordering the free edges of the straps 13 at the back of the headgear. Along the front and lower edges of the ear coverings 12, a similar lining strip 17 is arranged in a double layer (see FIG. 2).

The ear coverings 12 are formed with upstanding flanges 18 which merge into the straps 13, thus forming a collar 19 within which the lower edge of the crown 11 iSv-adapted to nest. The collar 19 thus provided extends continuously from the temple area at one side of the crown rearwardly and around to the corresponding temple area on the opposite side of the crown. Hence, the crown 11, ear coverings 12, `and straps 13 are in position to be fastened together by rivets 20.

Turning -again to the interior of the headgear 10, and referring to FIGS. 4 and 5, it will be -seen that a pair of straps 21 and 22, arcuate in shape, extend upward in crossed relation from the lower edge -of the `crown 11, being fastened thereto by rivets 23 extending through the ends of the straps, the crown and the collar 19. The straps 21 and 22 extend each from an anchor point or rivet 23 at one side of the rear of the crown 11 to an anchor point or rivet 23 at ythe opposite side `of the front of the crown 11; and they Iare made from a fiber or plastic material which is flexible but preferably not elastic, although some elasticity is not objectionable. The straps 21V and 22 constitute the headgear support which rests upon the head of the wearer and affords an over-all resiliency to absorb shocks resulting from an object striking the crown 11.

As thus far described, the head-gear 10 shown in the drawings is a preferred form of that type of headgear used 'by baseball players when at -bat and in danger of 1being hit in the head by an uncontrolled pitched ball. It should 4be pointed out now that a headgear of this type lacks the Versatility of being worn yby all or a majority of the players, since it necessarily conforms to a given size and shape of head, except as the lining strips 15, 16 and 17 may offer some flexibility of use. Thus, two competing teams would require several of the headgear of different sizes and shapes. Among the local midget or small fry leagues ywhere the use of a helmet is usually mandatory, the cost of outtting the teams is a serious handicap. In the professional leagues, and in other hazardous occupational areas, the cost can be borne but it is expensive.

As already stated, the present invention obviates the objectionable feature of made to size and shape headgear and provides the same type of headgear, which gives the same amount of protection, at substantially the same cost per unit, but whereby one unit serves in place of several units as made heretofore.

Refer-ring again to FIGS. 1 to 6, according to the present invention the crown 11 of the headgear is severed, or formed severed, as at 24, through and from the free front edge 25 thereof rearward substantially along the median of the crown 11 to a point Z6 (FIG. 5) near the rear edge 27 of the crown. This severance substantially di vides the crown 11 into two segments 28 and 29 hinged at ypoint 26 for lateral movement relatively t0 one another and carrying the ear coverings 12 with them, the collar 19 serving as a yielding support on which the segments 28 and 29 are mounted. The segments 28 and 29 are normally held together by expansion means, shown in the form of a strip of elastic rubber 30 anchored to each segment 28 and 29 of the crown 11 in the temple area thereof and extending upward and across the crown below the exible straps 21 and 22. The elastic strip 30 is anchored under slight tension to hold the segments 28 and 29 contiguously to comprise a headgear of the smallest predetermined size, yet the strip 30 will yield or stretch to permit the segments 28 and 29 to separate as at S (see FIG. 6) to any extent within the maximum limit of its stretchability. In practice, of course, this limit would be determined by the pressure exerted on the sides of the wearers head and the extent of separation which the crown 11 material will withstand at point 26.

A modification of the invention is shown in FIG. 7, wherein the crown 11 is severed along the line 35 from the free front edge rearward only as far as the top center 36 of the crown. This provides for separation of the crown and, hence expansibility, but to a more limited extent than in the case of the preferred embodiment shown in FIGS. 1 to 6.

Another modification of the invention is shown in FIG. 8, wherein the crown 11 of the headgear 10 is severed twice along the lines 41 and 42, on opposite sides of the median of the crown. This form of severance divides the crown into three parts comprising a stationary center segment 43 and lateral segments 44 and 4S movable sidewise relatively to the center segment 43, the lateral segments being connected to the center segment by strips of elastic rubber 46 under slight tension and stretchable to permit the said relative movement. This form of headgear olfers an advantage over those shown in FIGS. 1 to 7 in that while the separation S of the preferred embodiment would not be large enough to lessen the protective efficiency of the headgear for all practical purposes, in the embodiment shown in FIG. 8 the same amount of expansion of the headgear can be obtained with one-half the amount of separation at each severance line 41 and 42; and the front 47 of the center segment 43 remains unseparated to provide full protection in that area.

As already stated, many modifications and variations of the invention may be made without departing from its spirit or coming within the scope of the appended claims. The preferred embodiment and the two modications thereof which have been shown and described herein are practical and economical headgear. Of course, more elaborate and costly variations could be made. For example, an arrangement could tbe provided wherein the rear half of the crown is a solid shell and the forward half of the crown from the region of the ears could be formed of a plurality of separate sections pivoted at their rear ends to the shell portion and held against lateral movement by expansible means located at or near the front or forehead area. Furthermore, the headgear could comprise a stiff arched support extending from one side to the other in the region of the ear pieces; with a plurality of protective sections pivoted to the support and extending forward therefrom. Such arrangement, and others similar thereto, are considered to be within the broad scope of the invention.

Having thus described our invention, what we claim is:

1. A rigid protective helmet constructed and arranged to fit a variety of different head shapes and sizes comprising:

(a) an integrally formed rigid, hard top dome shaped crown for covering and protecting the entire top portion of a human head above the fore and aft line of the eyes and ears,

(b) an ear covering connected to each side of said crown to protect the ears and temples,

(c) each of said ear coverings have an integrally 4formed rearwardly extending band portion to form a protective covering for the base of the skull,

(d) said rearwardly extending band portions having their free ends overlapping at the rear of said crown,

(e) fastening means for connecting the overlapping ends of said band portion and said ear coverings to the lower edge of said dome crown,

(f) said crown being severed over a substantial portion of a meridian line extending over the top of said crown to divide said crown into a plurality of integrally connected segments whereby said segments can be laterally displaced to enlarge the size of said crown,

(g) and an elastic strap anchored to each of said segments and extending transversely of said meridian line to hold said segments of said crown contiguously to its smallest predetermined size.

2. A rigid protection helmet constructed and arranged to fit a variety of different head shapes and sizes comprising:

(a) an integrally formed rigid, hard top dome shaped crown for covering and protecting the entire top portion of a human head above the fore and aft line of the eyes and ears,

(b) an ear covering connected to each side of said crown to protect the ears and temples,

(c) each of said ear coverings having an integrally formed rearwardly extending band portion to form a protective covering for the base of the skull,

(d) said rearwardly extending band portions having their free ends overlapping at the rear of said crown,

(e) said ear coverings and connected band portions having an upstanding flange forming a collar for receiving the lower edge of crown portion in nesting relationships therewith,

(f) fastening means for connecting the overlapping ends of said band portions and the respective flanges of said ear coverings and their connected band portions to said dome crown,

(g) said crown being severed over a substantial portion of a meridian line extending fore and aft over the top thereof to divide said crown into a plurality of segments integrally connected together whereby said segments can be laterally displaced to enlarge its size of said crown,

(h) and an elastic strap anchored by said fastening means to each of said segments and extending transversely of said meridian line to hold said segments of said crown contiguously to its smallest predetermined size.

3. The invention as dened in claim 2 and including:

(a) a pair of flexible non-elastic straps anchored to opposite side of said helmet, and said pair of straps crossing diagonally on its inside of said dome crown.

4. The invention as defined in claim 3 wherein:

(a) said meridian line extends between the front of said crown and the top center of the crown.

5. The invention as defined in claim 1 and wherein:

(a) said crown is severed along a pair of meridian lines, each of said meridian lines being disposed on opposite sides of medial line of said crown.

6.A rigid protective helmet constructed and arranged to tit a variety of different head shapes and sizes comprising:

(a) an integrally formed rigid hard top dome shaped crown for covering and protecting the entire top portion of a human head above the fore and aft line of the eyes and ears,

(b) an ear covering connected to each side of said crown to protect the ears and temples,

(c) each of said ear coverings having an integrally formed rearwardly extending band portion to form a protective covering for the base of the skull,

(d) said rearwardly extending band portions having their free ends overlapping at the rear of said crown,

(e) said ear coverings and connected band portions having an upstanding flange forming a collar for receiving the lower edge of crown portion in nesting relationships therewith,

(f) fastening means for connecting the overlapping ends of said band portions `and the respective anges of said ear coverings and their connected band portions to said dome crown,

(g) said crown being severed over a substantial por.

rtion of a meridian line extending fore `and aft over the top thereof from the front of the crown to -a point near fthe rear edge of the crown .to divide said crown into a plurality of segments integrally connected together whereby said segments can be laterally dissaid crown contiguously to its smallest predetermined l References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,391,335 OBrien Dec. 18, 1945 2,710,972 lRadnoffsky June 21, 1955 2,805,419 Finken Sept. l0, 1957 2,861,272 Stuart Nov. 25, 1958 2,902,692 Christy et al. Sept. 8, 1959 2,923,941 1960 Roth et a1. Feb. 9,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2391335 *Apr 5, 1941Dec 18, 1945Hat CorpHead protector
US2710972 *Mar 10, 1953Jun 21, 1955Mancinelli Dino AWarm weather flying helmet
US2805419 *Aug 12, 1953Sep 10, 1957Leonard P FriederProtective pad and earphone support for safety helmets
US2861272 *Feb 21, 1957Nov 25, 1958Huxtable Leonard GHinged helmet
US2902692 *Oct 1, 1953Sep 8, 1959ClarkEar protector
US2923941 *Sep 25, 1956Feb 9, 1960 Protective helmet
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3204251 *Jul 31, 1964Sep 7, 1965Spalding & Bros Of Canada LtdHockey head protector
US3208080 *Mar 30, 1964Sep 28, 1965Hirsch Arthur ErnestProtective helmet
US3290693 *Dec 14, 1964Dec 13, 1966American Baseball Cap IncBaseball batter's helmet
US3381308 *Jul 13, 1965May 7, 1968Morris FinebergDecorative headgear
US3725956 *May 11, 1971Apr 10, 1973Reisen DLaminated helmet
US4477929 *Oct 26, 1983Oct 23, 1984Frosta Fritid AbProtective helmet
US4903346 *May 11, 1989Feb 27, 1990Dragerwerk AktiengesellschaftMulti-part protective helmet
US4955089 *Feb 13, 1989Sep 11, 1990Jeremy H. BealeTwo-piece hard hat
US5271103 *Oct 19, 1992Dec 21, 1993Darnell Eric AImpact protective headgear
US5575017 *Jan 2, 1996Nov 19, 1996Rawlings Sporting Goods Company, Inc.Adjustable baseball batter's helmet
US5694649 *Oct 28, 1996Dec 9, 1997Rawlings Sporting Goods Company, Inc.Adjustable baseball batter's and catcher's helmet with mask
US5794272 *Jan 31, 1996Aug 18, 1998Specialized Bicycle Components, Inc.Protective helmet with improved retention system having a rear stabilizer
US6128786 *Oct 16, 1997Oct 10, 2000Hos Development CorporationOne-size-fits-all helmet
US6131207 *Dec 29, 1995Oct 17, 2000Gallet S.A.Helmet having resilient bending means in the lower rear portion of the shell thereof
US8037548 *Jan 12, 2007Oct 18, 2011Sport Maska Inc.Adjustable helmet
US8095995 *Jan 12, 2007Jan 17, 2012Sport Maska Inc.Adjustable helmet shell
US9345282Jul 13, 2012May 24, 2016Bauer Hockey, Inc.Adjustable helmet for a hockey or lacrosse player
US20070266481 *Jan 12, 2007Nov 22, 2007Garnet AlexanderAdjustable helmet
US20070266482 *Jan 12, 2007Nov 22, 2007Garnet AlexanderAdjustable helmet shell
US20090049586 *Aug 12, 2008Feb 26, 2009Head Germany, GmbhSafety helmet
US20110271426 *Aug 20, 2008Nov 10, 2011Rose Plastic AgIndustrial Impact Protection Helmet
US20120000011 *Jul 1, 2010Jan 5, 2012Jay GrewallTriple locking, bi-hemispheric safety helmet
DE2724984A1 *Jun 2, 1977Dec 8, 1977RenaultSchutzhelm
EP0391389A1 *Apr 4, 1990Oct 10, 1990K.W. Hochschorner GmbhHelmet
WO1996021370A1 *Dec 29, 1995Jul 18, 1996Gallet S.A.Improvement to a helmet having resilient bending means in the lower rear portion of the shell thereof
WO2014150694A3 *Mar 12, 2014Jan 8, 2015Suddaby Loubert SHelmet with multiple protective zones
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/420, D29/106
International ClassificationA42B3/32
Cooperative ClassificationA42B3/324
European ClassificationA42B3/32C