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Publication numberUS3107425 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 22, 1963
Filing dateMar 7, 1962
Priority dateMar 7, 1962
Publication numberUS 3107425 A, US 3107425A, US-A-3107425, US3107425 A, US3107425A
InventorsRentz Robert I
Original AssigneeRentz Robert I
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cutting instrument
US 3107425 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 22, 1963 R. 1. REN-rz CUTTING INSTRUMENT 2 Sheets-Sheet l Filed March '7, 1962 INVENTOR. Robert I. Rentz Fig. 5

Oct. 22, 1963 R. l. RENTz CUTTING INSTRUMENT 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 7, 1962 INVENTOR. 5o ber'J I. Renz United States Patent O 3,107,425 CUTTING iNSIREIh/iilbl Robert I. Renta, 1313 Devils Backbone Road, Green Township, Hamiiton County, (Ehio Filed Mar. 7, 19o2, Ser. No. 178,115 12 Claims. (Ci. 3rd-123.3)

This invention relates to cutting instruments, and in particular to a cutting instrument for paper.

An object of this invention is to provide for a facile act of severance of a sheet of paper into two cleanly delined portions after operation of -the instrument thereon.

Another object of this invention is to provide for a paper cutting tool which is reusable by merely replenishing same with a wetting solution absorbable by the paper to be severed.

Desirable features for a cutting instrument like that of the involved subject matter is versitility while nevertheless being non-damaging to adjacent sheets of paper, and freedom of movement over, about, or on the paper being severed. For example, when a clipping of certain size is desired to be removed from, say, a page of newspaper, magazine, book, or the like, the usual manner of removal heretofore has been by the use of a scissors, a straight edge, by a razor blade, or by simply ripping a portion of the sheet or page out ythereby leaving the edges of the remainder of the page or sheet and of the removed portion ragged and uneven. Use of scissors or -a straight edge is awkward in removing an interior portion of the sheet, while a razor blade leaves evidence of damage to the page or sheet of paper beneath the one being cut. Even the use of the point or a mere straight pin tends to jam small particles of paper yahead ofthe point as it is drawn across the surface of the paper. A jagged edge results and the adjacent lower sheet is also damaged due to the excessive force required to pull the pin across the paper.

it is therefore another obiect of this invention to eliminate the awkwardness in cutting a sheet of paper.

Another object is to prevent damaging effects to the paper being cut and to the adjacent sheets of paper when a portion of the paper or sheet is desired to be removed, with the resultant pattern dimensions of the severed and remaining portions of paper being sharp and well defined, depending upon the direction of cutting movement taken by the instrument of this invention.

A further object of this invention is to provide an instrument for dividing iibrous sheet material into sections which comprises means for moistening a narrow strip of the sheet material at the line of separation and a stylus associated with the moistening means and arranged to scrape or scratch the surface of the sheet to bruise the fibres thereof and permit entry of the moisture into the fibres to lower the tensile strength `along the line of moistening.

These and other objects 'will be apparent to those skilled in the art to which this invention pertains, from the following description and appended claims thereto, and with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FlG. 1 is a sectional View in elevation of the invention;

FIG. 2 -is an enlarged view of the forward end of the instrument shown in FiG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a view taken on line 3--3 of HG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a View taken on line 4 4 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged sectional view in elevation of the forward end of la modified form of the invention;

FIG. 6 is `a view taken on line 6-6 of FLG. 5;

FIG. 7 is `a view taken on line 7-7 of FIG. 5;

FlG. 8 is a sectional View of the forward end of another form of the device embodying the invention;

FIG. 9 is a view taken on line 9-9 of FIG. 8;

lhld Patented Get. 22, 1963 ICC FG. 10 is a View taken on line iti-1li of FIG. 8;

FiG. 11 is a 4fragmentary section of a modilied element of the invention;

FIG. 12 is a perspective view illustrating use of the invention; and

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary elevational section illustrating an application of the device to a sheet of paper.

With reference to the drawings the invention is illustrated as being incorporated in a cylindrical type of writing-like instrument indicated generally by Zt) in FIG. 1.

The instrument 2t? in FIG. 1 comprises an elongated cylindrical casing of suitable metal or plast-ic construction, having `a hollow rear barrel section 21 and a plug or 4forward barrel section 22 screwably threaded yto section 21 as m 23. Means for cutting a sheet of paper is employed or mounted forwardly of plug 22 and i11- cludes a cutting element 25 having a cutting tip or point 26 and a wick material 27 having Va marginal surface 27a in such proximate and adjacent relation to tip 2.6 that when tip 26 normally engages or penetrates a sheet of paper, the marginal surface or width 27a physically contacts the surface of such sheet of paper.

The instrument 2d thus may be conveniently manipulater by hand and fingers when it is used. Within hollow rear barrel section 21 a ycylindrical chamber 28 extends from the rear end of section Zforwardly to its other internally threaded end portion 29 which cooperatively receives an externally threaded reduced cylindrical end portion 3@ on plug 22. Rear barrel section 21 thus seats upon a peripheral seat 31 of plug 22 while being ecured to the latter by screwing said respective end portions to each other. A wetting solution 32 adsorbable by the paper to be severed, is contained within chamber or reservoir 23 for adaptation to and utilization in the actual cutting operation as will be hereinafter more fully described. An annular boss 33 is provided on the forward edge of plug 22 to prevent the fingers from slipping downwardly upon the paper while instrument 2.0 is being used.

Chamber 23 communicates with a plurality of conduits 35 (FIGS. 2 and 4) radially displaced from and parallel to the axis of plug 22, which conduits extend longitudinally forwardly in `a body core 36 of plug 22 to a bore 37 axially stormed in the front end of plug 22 to accommodate a retaining or clamping means 38 for wick material 27 about cutting element 25. Preferably, la bore 39 is formed rearwardlyof plug 22 and extends inwardly to its base 4t) from which conduits 35' extend forwardly in body core 36 to terminate at base .1 of bore 37.

Cutting element 25 is formed preferably from a metallic elongated rigid rod, one end of which is axially secured or otherwise rigidly embedded into plug 22 or its body core 36, and has its remaining length extending through and forwardly of bore 37 to terminate in its cutting tip or point 26 forwardly or beyond boss 33. The sharpness of tip 26 is of a nature which will penetrate or pierce a sheet of paper easily; however, it preferably is not razor sharp. Wick material 27 surrounds cutting element 25 and is disposed within bore 37, extending towards cutting tip 26 where its marginal surface 27a is formed in cooperating relationship with and to cutting tip Z6. Preferably, about a 1,/32 spacing exists between the extreme terminus of tip 26 and marginal surface 27a. A conducting system for wetting solution 32 is thus effected from chamber 28 through conduits 35 and thence to wick material 27 which is thereby maintained in a saturated condition during operation of the device.

Clamping means '38 comprises an open cylinderwhich is press t into bore 37 and functions to contain'and retain wick material 27 lin proper position with `respect to the length of cutting element 27 and to cutting tip 26. Means 3S is preferably frusto-conically shaped at its forward oritice 43 through which wick 27 and tip 26 protrude, but is nevertheless sufficiently spaced from or short of marginal surface 27a so as to preclude a dragging effect of means 33 on the paper in operation of the instrument thereon.

Illustrated in FIGS. 5, 6, and 7 is a modified form of the invention. Integral with a plug or barrel section 62 is an annular hollow neck 63 which projects concentrically forwardly of a boss 64 on plug 62, and along the outer periphery of which screw threads 65 are provided. A cylindrical cap 66 is adapted to be adjustably screwed or otherwise suitably secured upon neck 63 by means of an engaging thread or ring 67 mounted within the open end of cap 66 and which cooperatively engages threads 65. Cap 66 includes an aperture 70 at an apex formed by a conical surface 71 on cap 66 and through which aperture 70 the point or tip 72 of a cutting element 73 protrudes. The other end of cutting element 73 is iixedly imbedded in and of a mandrel or concentric cylindrical core extension 74 seating axially within the bore formed by neck 63 and upon a core body 75 of plug 62. A layer of wick material 76 is mounted upon and envelopes or surrounds a tapering portion 77 of core extension 7d, and extends from the end of neck 63 to and through aperture 70 of cap 66. The cooperative relationship between tip 72 and a marginal surface 76a of wick material 76 is the same as that illustrated in FIG. 2.

A plurality of conduits 80', each of which is radially displaced from and parallel to the axis of plug 62, extends longitudinally through core body 75 of plug 62, to communicate with an axial bore 81 located at the rearward end of plug 62. Plug 62 is secured by means of threads 32 to a rear barrel section of a casing housing a reservoir (not shown) in like fashion as was done in the case of sections 21, 22. Each of conduits 80 communicates with one of a corresponding plurality of slotted grooves S3 radially displaced from the axis of and longitudinally disposed along the periphery of extension '74 which press tit to or otherwise mounted in neck 63. Rear end 84 of core extension 74 is reduced in diameter to accommodate such communication (FIGS. S and 6).

The forward end of slotted grooves 83 terminate at tapering portion 77 of extension 74 adjacent wicking 76. Direct saturation of wicking 76 by a wetting solution is provided through the communication of grooves 83 contiguous thereto with conduits 80 and bore 81 leading to the reservoir in which the solution is carried. By means of screwably adjusting retaining cap 66 upon neck 63, the rate of flow of the wetting solution through aperture 70 may be controlled. In other words, restriction of a portion of or compression otherwise of wick material 76 by tightening'cap 66 on neck 63 reduces flow of the wetting solution, while the reverse operation increases such flow. The amount of wetting solution thus deposited upon a sheet of paper during operation of the device is controlled. It should be noted, however, that vcap 66 is not necessary in the actual operation of the device, as it will be observed with respect to the embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIGS, 8, 9, and l0.

A body core extension 91 is press tit to or otherwise mounted in a forward barrel section or plug 92 having threads 93 formed on a reduced rear cylindrical portion 94 thereof adapted to be secured to a threaded hollow casing 95, in which a container or capsule 96 is positioned. Capsule 96 constitutes a portable reservoir for casing 95' and may be made of soft plastic similar to that used in fountain pen refills. Capsule 96 carries a wetting solution 97 therein, has a frangible end 98 which is capable of being punctured by means of a sharp end edge 99 formed on a hollow tube 100 securely mounted axially in plug 92, after the plug has been threaded to casing 95. Hollow tube 18) extends forwardly in plug 92 to the base of an axial bore 101 extending backwardly from the front of plug 92. A shoulder 102 is included in bore 161 to Cit provide seat for a body core extension 91 which is press tit to shoulder 102. Core extension 91 comprises a cylinder or mandrel having a plurality of slotted grooves 104 running longitudinally of the periphery thereof and extending from the cylinders base seated on shoulder 102 to a tapering portion 105 mounted on its other end extending forwardly out of or beyond plug 92. A wick material 106 is wound upon and frictionally held to tapering portion 105 by winding therearound, and is thrust onto and about a cutting element 107 having a cutting tip or point 107a protruding slightly beyond a marginal surface or width 106.@ of wick material 106. Cutting element 107 is rigidly secured in core extension 103 while material 106a is formed in proximate and adjacent relation to cutting tip 107a in the same manner as shown in the previously described embodiments. The marginal width 106a, of course, cooperates with tip 107a in the operation of the device upon a sheet of paper, in the same way as exemplified by the devices illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 5.

Hollow tube 100 connects the reservoir of wetting solution 97 to wick material 106 through bore 101 and slotted grooves 104, thereby providing for a continuous gravitational flow of wetting solution to saturate wick material 106. Should it be desired that body core extension 91 be press tit to the base of bore 101, alternative means may be provided to carry the flow of wetting solution to the slotted grooves of the body core extension. As shown in FIG. ll, a hollow tube 110 is provided with a series of apertures 111 exteriorly of a forward plug 112 and of a frangble capsule (not shown). Piercing of a frangible capsule by open tube 110` provides for iiow of wetting solution through apertures 111 to conduits 113. Wetting solution, therefore, may iiow from the capsule to a plurality of conduits 113 in a reduced end portion 114 of plug 112. Each of conduits 113 correspondingly registers with a respective slotted groove 115 of a body core extension 116 press tit in axial bore 117 thereby assuring a continuous flow of solution to a wick material (not shown) mounted in the device in a manner similar to that illustrated in the previously described embodiments.

In operation, illustrated :by cutting instrument 20 in FIGS. l2 and 13, capillary action of the wetting solution is induced in the paper about tip 26. When reservoir 2S containing wetting solution 32 and instrument 20 arc held in operating position (FIG. l2), the solvent is gravitationally drawn into bore 39 and through conduits 35 to completely saturate wick material 27 so that a continuous medium of solvent extends from the free body of the wetting solution within reservoir 23 to the entire length of wick 27. Instrument 20 is applied to a top sheet 12) of a pad or number of compiled sheets 121 and cutting tip 26 engages the sheet sufficiently by ordinary hand pressure if not by less pressure, so that it penetrates into or pierces the depth of the fibrous mane 122 making up the sheet (FIG. 13). Simultaneously, marginal surface 27a of wick material 27 physically engages the surface of sheet 128. Instrument 20 is thence drawn across sheet as shown by the arrow in FIG. l2. An absorption marginal area 123 is formed along and substanoially parallel to the incision 124 made by cutting tip, 26 i.e., along the direction of movement of instrument 20, as can ybe evidenced by including a small amount of colored vegetable dye in wetting solution 32, if desired. In other words, the wetting solution is absorbed by the fibers of the paper upon exposure thereto by the cutting action of tip or point 26. As a result of such weakening and the cutting, shearing, rupturing, or other breaking effect `which cutting tip 26 has on the paper fibers as it passes along in sheet of paper 120, the portions A and B of sheet 120 (FIG. l2) remain loosely or weakenedly together. A simple act of pulling by hand severs portions A and B from each other, thereby resulting in a cleanly defined, clear-cut separation of portions A and B.

I have found that no substantial difference occurs in the eiiicient operation or in the effect of the use of this cutting instrument on paper by either having tip 26 extending sli-ghtly beyond the adjacent or continuous Vmargin 27a of wick material 27 or by having the wick material extend iorwardly of oriiice 43 on retainer 3S to the same lineal degree as cutting tip 26. The important relationship between cutting element and wick material is that as the paper is penetrated or pierced by cutting tip 26 and vdrawn thereacross, thereby aiecting the existing relationship of the papers fibres through rupturing or breaking of bres or other-wise, the marginal surface 27u of the wick material physically contacts the surfaces of the paper. The theory which is believed to explain the efficient operation of the device is that capillary action of the wetting solution is induced upon the interstices and other passages or canals which exist in both untreated and treated paper and by such action the paper and fibres thereof rapidly absorb such wetting solution in the area along the direction of movement of the cutting instrument. It is a property inherent in paper that wetting solutions weaken its tensile strength. This, cou* pled with the 'bruising effect of the cutting tip of the instrument, produces the result that the paper may be immediately severed quickly and easily by a very light manual pulling action.

It should be observed `from FlG. l2 that in the normal use of instrument 20, marginal surface or width 27a precedes or leads cutting tip 26 as the latter is drawn across sheet 12?. ln this manner, sheet 120 is assured a supply of wetting solution as cutting tip 26 pierces or penetrates the treated or untreated paper.

The operation ofthe invention is as etiective on treated paper as on non-treated paper. In the case of treated paper, i.e., one having sizing incorporated therein for subsequent purposes of printing or other uses, unless a wetting solution actually penetrates the surface of the paper, it will run off. However, regardless of the nature of the sizing used in a particular treated sheet of paper, the cutting element provides an effective means to penetrate the paper for the 4wetting solution bei-ng used, thereby providing `for direct access to the paper iibers to weaken their tensile strength. Such means, coupled with the cutting shearing, rupturing, or other breakin-g yfunction of the cutting element upon the bers accomplishes the eicient result of conditioning the paper to be cleanly severed by a simple manual pull between the involved paper portions being cut `during the `following immediate interim during which the wetting solution absorbed by the fibers has not evaporated.

l have also observed that no wetness or other visible evidence are left on paper directly below and supporting the sheet of paper severed except for a slight impression from the line taken by the cutting tip of the instrument in some instances. The exact reasons for this remarkable phenomenon :may be explained on more than one the oretical ground, however, it appears that although the point pressure applied to the sheet of paper being cut by the cutting element is relatively large were it to be measured in terms of pounds per square inch, the applied pressure seems to be absorbed by the paper iibers thereby effecting a cutting, shearing, rupturin-g, or other breaking upon the fibers, -while the wetting solution takes the least line of resistance in that it has immediate access to those iibers that have been exposed thereto by the penetration of the cutting element in the sheet of paper being severed thereby. Of course, the cutting tip has not been forced completely through the upper sheet of paper, for were it, a delinite mark would appear on paper beneath. The normal operation of my invention on a sheet ot paper does not require an amount of pressure necessary to force the cutting tip entirely through the sheet being severed.

It will be seen from a use of the invention that it is readily adaptable for cutting all kinds of paper sheet products, for example, in cutting out newspaper and magazine clippings, paper designs for toys and childrens playrooms at home and at school, opening envelopes, and for any other paper sheet product that is not absolutely waterproof or solventproof. Water appears to be as an effective wetting solution as other known and generally used wetting solutions for paper, such as zinc chloride. Any wetting solution short of being corrosive in nature toward paper appears to be applicable to the instant invention. A mixture of water and glycerine has been found to be satisfactory.

Should it be desirable, an air vent may be included in any of the rear barrel sections used, for the purpose of equalizing pressure in the reservoir with atmospheric pressures `so that the wetting solution may freely gravitate in the instrument. However, at least more than one slotted groove in the bore extensions and at least more than one conduit through the body core of a forward barrel section, effects the same result of equalization of such pressures.

Pursuant to the requirements of the patent statutes, the principle of this invention has been explained and exemplified in a manner so tha-t it can be readily practiced by those skilled :in the art to which it pertains, such exemplication including what is presently considered to represent the best embodiment of the invention. However, it should be clearly understood that, within the scope of the `appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described and exemplified herein, by those skilled in fthe art, and having the benetit of this disclosure.

That which is claimed as patentably novel is:l

1. A device for severing a sheet of paper comprising, in combination, a iixed cutting element having a rigid cutting tip thereon, a wick material surrounding saidl cutting element and extending to Ia substantially proximate and adjacent physical relation to said cutting tip, a reservoir for a wetting solution adapted to saturate said wick material, and means provided toy conduct 'the flow of solution to said wick material whereby upon application of said device to a sheet of paper, said wick material and cutting tip so cooperatively related to both physically engage the surface of 'the sheet of paper upon application of said device thereto, and as said cutting element is drawny across such sheet, the tensile strength of the fibers of the paper is weakened by the absorption of the wetting solution to which the tihers have been exposed by said cutting tip, the paper being subsequently severed along the direction of movement of the cutting element by a minimum pulling apart of the portions of the sheet being severed from each other.

2. A device for severing a sheet of paper comprising, in combination, a lixed cutting element having a rigid cutting point thereon, a wick material surrounding said element and extending to a substantially proximate and adjacent physical relation to said cutting point, a reservoir for a wetting solution absorbent to the sheet of paper to be severed, said reservoir being connected to said wick material whereby the wetting solution is communicated from said reservoir to said wick material, said wick material and cutting tip so cooperatively related to both physically engage the sheet upon application of the device thereto, a marginal line of wetting solution being deposited upon the surface of the paper tturough capillary action as the instrument is drawn across such surface, the cutting point rupturing the paper iibers as the wetting solution saturating the exposed lfibers upon physical engagement of said point and wick material to such paper weakens the tensile strength of said fibers, whereby such sheet of paper is facilely severed by a step of separation of the paper along the line said cutting point takes.

3. A cutting instrument for severing paper comprising, in combination, a fiixed cutting element having a rigid cutting tip, aplug, a body core in said plug, said cutting element rigidly mounted to said body core, Ia bore in said plug through which and beyond which said iixed element extends and terminates at its rigid cut-ting tip, a wick material surrounding said element in said bore and extending to a substantially proximate and adjacent physical relation to said cutting tip thereby providing for a marginal area of material contiguous to and spaced in proximate and adjacent physical relation to said cutting tip, `a casing secured to said plug and having a reservoir for a wetting solution therein, and at least one conduit in said body core connecting said reservoir to said bore and wick material, said wick material when saturated with the wetting solution and cutting tip cooperating when said instrument is lapplied to the sheet of paper to expose and weaken the fibers thereof, said sheet then being subsequently capable of severance along the direction of movement of said instrument across the paper.

4. The cutting instrument of claim 3 including a retaininU means for said wick material mounted in said bore about said wick material and beyond said wick bore engaging said material to the rigid cutting element.

5. A cutting instrument for severing paper comprising, in combination, a cutting element having a cutting tip, a forward barrel section including a body core, a bore in said section, said cutting element rigidly secured to said section and extending forwardly through said bore to terminate at its cutting tip beyond said section, a wick material disposed in said bore and about said element and extending to a proximate and adjacent relation to said cutting tip, -a casing secured to `said section and having a reservoir for a wetting solution therein, and at `least one conduit in said body core connecting said reservoir to said bore and wick material, said wick material when saturated with `the wetting solution and cutting `tip cooperating when said instrument is applied to the sheet of paper to expose and weaken the bers thereof, said sheet then being subsequently capable of severance along the direction of movement of said instrument across the paper.

6. The cutting instrument of claim 5 including a retaining means for said wick material mounted in said bore about said wick material and clamping said wick material to the cutting element beyond said bore.

7. A cutting instrument for severing a sheet of paper comprising a mandrel, a cutting element rigidly mounted in said mandrel and having a cutting tip, said mandrol having at least one slotted groove extending along the length of its periphery, a wick material mounted on said mandrel, said cutting tip protruding through said material `and in proximate and adjacent relation thereto, a forward barrel section having a neck defining a bore therein, said mandrel mounted in said bore, a rear barrel section having a reservoir for a wetting solution therein, said sections secured together, said forward barrel section having a conduit or conduits therein corresponding to the number of slotted grooves in said mandrel, each conduit registering with said bore thereby connecting said reservoir with the slotted grooves, whereby the wetting solution flows to said wick material which cooperates with said cutting tip to expose and weaken the fibers of the paper for subsequent severance between the portions of such paper along the direction of movement of said instrument across the paper.

8. An instrument for severing a sheet of paper comprising, in combination, a hollow rear barrel section having a reservoir for a wetting solution therein, a plug secured to said rear barrel section, said plug having a bore in its front end, a body core in said plug, at least one conduit through lsaid body core connecting said reservoir to said bore, a cutting element having a cutting point thereon and being rigidly secured to said ybody core and extending axially through and forwardly of said bore, a wick material mounted in said bore and surrounding the length of said cutting element therein and extendlng to an adjacent and proximate relation to said point of said cutting element, and a retaining cylinder for said wick material secured to said plug and protruding therefrom, said cylinder having an orifice therein through which said cutting element and material extend toward the point of said element, whereby saturation of the wick material by the wetting solution provides for a cooperative relation thereof with said tip to perform a severing operation upon a sheet of paper after said point is drawn thereacross.

9. A device for severing paper comprising, in combination, a body plug, a reservoir for a wetting solution, a cutting element having a cutting tip thereon and being securely mounted to said body plug, a wick material surrounding and physically engaging said element, retaining means for said wick material secured to said body plug, means for conducting the wetting solution from said reservoir through said plug to said wick ma terial, said cutting tip and wick material extending out of said retaining means, said wick material in proximate and adjacent relation to said tip and providing thereabouts a marginal area of material saturated with the wetting solution and capable of physically contacting the surface of a sheet of paper as said cutting tip penetrates such surface upon application and operation of said instrument thereon, said cutting tip and marginal area of saturated wick material cooperating to expose and weaken the fibers of the paper whereby the paper is capable of being severed along the direction of movement of said instrument.

l0. A device for cutting paper comprising a forward barrel section, a hollow casing, a capsule constituting a reservoir for a wetting solution in said casing, a hollow tube mounted in said section and having a sharp-edged end extending therefrom adapted for puncturing said capsule, said section secured -to -said casing, said section defining a bore in the front end thereof, said hollow tube connecting the reservoir with said bore, a mandrel mounted into said bore and having at least one slotted groove extending the length of its periphery, a cutting clement rigidly mounted in said mandrel and having a cutting tip thereon protruding forwardly of said mandrel, a wick material mounted about the forward end 0f Isaid mandrel and over the groove or grooves whereby -the material is capable of saturation by the wetting solution, said cutting tip being thrust through said wick material and being in a proximate and adjacent relation thereto, whereby said cutting tip `and wick material cooperate to expose and weaken the bers of the paper which is capable of being immediately severed thereafter along the direction of movement of said device upon the paper.

ll. `ln a cutting instrument for severing a sheet of paper having a forward body core section, the improvement comprising a bore in said section extending forwardly therein, a fixed cutting element including a rigid cutting tip secured to said core section and extending through and protruding from said bore, wick material mounted in said bore about said fixed cutting element therein, surrounding and enveloping said element t0 a proximate and adjacent physical relation to said cutting tip thereby providing for a marginal strip of wick material contiguous to said tip, at least one conduit in said body core adapted to connect a reservoir of wetting solution :to said bore and said wick material, said wick material when saturated with the wetting solution and cutting tip cooperating together when said instrument is applied to a sheet of paper to expose and weaken the fibers of the sheet of paper.

l2. A device for dividing a sheet of fibrous material into separable parts which comprises a. reservoir for holding a fluid for moistening the sheet, a wick connected to the reservoir in communication with the interior of the reservoir to receive duid therefrom, a fixed stylus of rigid material mounted on the reservoir and 9 10 having a rigid free pointed end, seid wick surrounding ing for the flow of .fluid to enter the yfibers to weaken the and enveloping said stylus and having an exposed por- Sht alOIlg the mOlS'feIled `StD-1P- tion extending to a proximate and `adjacent physical relation to said free pointed end, said exposed portion and References Cited m the me of thls patent end of stylus in ooopertaive relation to physically e-n- 5 UNITED STATES PATENTS gage the sheet where, upon engagement of said device 942,152 Tucker Dee. 7, 1909 with the sheet, the wick meistens `a stripy on the sheet 1,828,621 Roberts Oct, 20, 1931 and ,the stylus bruises bers of the sheet thereby provid- 2,042,965 Rivard June 2, 1936

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US942152 *Jan 4, 1909Dec 7, 1909James W TuckerGlass-cutter.
US1828621 *Aug 13, 1930Oct 20, 1931Roberts John ARoofing paper cutter
US2042965 *Sep 18, 1934Jun 2, 1936Rivard Nelson JCutting implement
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4974324 *Jul 28, 1989Dec 4, 1990Somar CorporationAppliance for cutting out thin film
US6021574 *Nov 5, 1997Feb 8, 2000Murray, Iii; William W.Scribing tool
US6523264Jul 20, 2000Feb 25, 2003The Albert Design Company, Inc.Method and apparatus for cutting an object while simultaneously applying a border to the object
Classifications
U.S. Classification30/123.3, 30/164.9
International ClassificationB26B27/00
Cooperative ClassificationB26B27/00
European ClassificationB26B27/00