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Publication numberUS3110971 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 19, 1963
Filing dateMar 16, 1962
Priority dateMar 16, 1962
Publication numberUS 3110971 A, US 3110971A, US-A-3110971, US3110971 A, US3110971A
InventorsSing-Wu Chang
Original AssigneeSing-Wu Chang
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Anti-skid textile shoe sole structures
US 3110971 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 19, 1963 sms-wu CHANG ANTI-SKID TEXTILE SHOE SOLE STRUCTURES 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 16, 1962 INVENTOR. S\N6 Wu CHANG ATTORNEYS Nov. 19, 1963 SING-WU CHANG 3,110,971

ANTI-SKID TEXTILE SHOE SQLE STRUCTURES Filed March 16, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 5s a d 5 INVENTOR. 42 40 SING--WL1 CHANCT I| ,-\o 42 BY AT TO RN EYE United States Patent 3,116,971 ANTI-SKID TEXTILE SHUE SOLE STRUCTURES Sing-Wu Chang, 19 Un Chair St., Kowloon, Hong Kong Filed Mar. 16, 1962, Ser. No. 180,166 8 Ciaims. (CI. 36-69) This invention relates to novel anti-skid shoe sole structures constructed of textile materials, and especially but not exclusively for incorporation in athletic shoes The primary object of the invention is the provision of efficient and long-wearing structures of the kind indicated which have outstanding absorbency for perspiration for the prevention of fungus infections, such as athletes foot, and burning sensations of the feet, when worn for long periods of time under strenuous conditions, such as met with in hot, dry or humid weather, and in cold weather.

Another object of the invention is the provision of structures of the character indicated above wherein pluralities of transverse cleats of high skid resistance, on floors, outdoor pavements and grounds, are formed in lower layers of a sole composed of layers of absorbent textile material, with stitching passed through the loops and through the layers, at opposite sides of the loops, so as to retain the shape of the loops and hold them securely relative to the sole.

Other important objects and advantageous features of the invention will be apparent from the following descriptions and the accompanying drawings, wherein, for purposes of illustration only, specific forms of the invention is set forth in detail.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of an athletic type of shoe incorporating a shoe sole in accordance with the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is an exploded, perspective view of the said shoe, including an inner sole;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged vertical transverse section taken on the line 3-3 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view of a bottom or outer sole component of said structure, before formation of cleat loops, and showing layers separated;

FIGURE 5 is an enlanged vfragmentary section taken on the line 55 of FIGURE 4;

FIGURE 6 is a bottom perspective view showing the outer sole partially formed with cleat loops;

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged fragmentary section taken on the line 77 of FIGURE 6; i

FIGURE 8 is an exploded perspective view of another shoe sole structure of the present invention;

FIGURE 9 is a perspective view showing the inner sole and the outer sole of the structure of FIGURE 8 partially assembled; and

FIGURE 10 is an enlarged section taken on the line 1tlltl of FIGURE 9.

Referring in detail to the drawings, wherein like and related numenals designate like and related parts throughout the several views, and first to FIGURES 1 through 7, the shoe sole structure therein shown and generally designated 12, comprises a cushion inner sole 14 secured upon an outer sole 1d, and secured to the peripheral edge 18 of the body 26 of a shoe 22. As shown in FIGURE 3, the edge 18 is inserted between the outer sole 16 and the inner sole 14 and secured, by suitable means, thereto.

The inner sole 14 can comprise an absorbent textile material envelope 24, preferably of cotton canvas, which is filled with sutable resilient material 26. Stitchings 2d and 33 are sewn through the envelope 24 and the material 26 to define between them an arch supporting cushion 32, and between the stitching 3d and the rear end of the envelope, a heel cushion 34, respectively.

"ice

The outer sole 16, as shown in FIGURES 4 and 5, is composed of a plurality of similar and registered layers of absorbent textile material, preferably cotton canvas secured together by cross stitching 42. Downwardly projecting closely longitudinally spaced, transversely extending anti-skid cleats 38 are formed on the outer sole 16, by folding all of the layers 36 into loops in line with the stitching 42. In a manual operation, the loops 49 are formed one at a time. After each loop 4b is formed, the stitching 42 is made through the bights 46 of the loops. Horizontal stitching 48 is then passed back and forth through the cleats, immediately adjacent to the bottom surface 5! of the sole, through the opposed walls 52 of the loops, so that the outer sides of the walls 52 are indented, as indicated at 54, and the inner sides of the walls are in contact, as indicated at This results in retention of the shape of the loop and prevents its shifting longitudinally relative to the outer sole 16, while leaving the resultant cleat free to be compressed in contact with a surface, by the weight of the wearer of the shoe, and to yield, to a limited degree, longitudinally of the sole, whereby a buoyant resilient eiiect is obtained. As shown in FIGURE 1 and partially in FIGURE 6, the cleats 32 extend the. full length of the sole 16. The inner sole 14- is secured upon the outer sole 16 in any suitable manner by means of sewing 57.

Another shoe sole structure, generally designated 12a, is shown in FIGURES 8 to 10, which comprises a solid fiat absorbent textile composition inner sole 14a, and an outer or bottom sole 16a, upon which the inner sole is secured, by a peripheral line of stitching 57a.

The inner sole 14a is composed of a plurality of similar registered, preferably cotton canvas layers 58, which are held together by the cross stitching 69.

The outer or bottom sole 16a is the same in construction as the outer sole 16 of FIGURES 1 through 7, except that transverse rows of vertical stitchings 6 2 are added, which are disposed at the opposite sides of the cleats 38a and extend vertically, back and forth through the layers 36a of the outer sole 16a and the layers 53 of the inner sole 14a, whereby the assembly of the soles is reinforced and the soles firmly secured together in non-shifting relationship, and the stability of the cleats 33a, relative to the sole is enhanced.

Horizontal stitching ida passes through the cleat loops adjacent to the bottom surface of the outer sole 16a.

Although there have been shown and described preferred forms of the invention, it is to be understood that the invention is not necessarily confined thereto, and that any change or changes in the structures of and in the relative arrangements of components thereof are contemplated as being within the scope of the invention as defined by the claims appended hereto.

What is claimed is:

1. An anti-skid shoe sole structure comprising an outer sole composed of layers of absorbent textile material secured together, and cleats extending across and extending downwardly from the undersurface of the sole, the sole being folded intermediate its ends to define loops constituting the cleats, said loops having opposed walls, and first securing means holding the opposed walls of the loops in contact with each other, each of said cleats being continuous and extending the full width of the sole.

2. An anti-skid shoe sole structure comprising an outer sole composed of layers of absorbent textile material secured together, and cleats extending across and extending downwardly from the undersurface of the sole, the sole being folded intermediate its ends to define loops constituting the cleats, said loops having opposed walls, and first securing means holding the opposed walls 3 of the loops in contact with each other, each of said cleats being continuous and extending the full width of the sole, and an inner soie of absorbent textile material secured upon the outer sole.

3. An anti-skid shoe sole structure comprising an outer sole composed of layers of absorbent textile material secured together, and cleats extending across and extending downwardly from the undersurface of the sole, the sole being folded intermediate its ends to define loops constituting the cleats, said loops having opposed walls, and first securing means holding the opposed walls of the loops in contact with each other, each of said cleats being continuous and extending the full width of the sole, said first securing means comprising horizontal stitching extending back and forth through the opposed Walls of the loops.

4. An anti-skid shoe sole structure comprising an outer sole composed of layers of absorbent textile material secured together, and cleats extending across and extending downwardly from the undersur face of the sole, the sole being folded intermediate its ends to define loops constituting the cleats, said loops having opposed Walls, and first securing means holding the opposed walls of the loops in contact with each other, each of said cleats being continuous and extending the full width of the sole, said first securing means comprising horizontal stitching extending back and forth through the opposed Walls of the loops, said loops having bights, and second securing means securing together the layers comprising the bights.

5. An anti-skid shoe sole structure comprising an outer sole composed of layers of absorbent textile material secured together, and cleats extending across and extending downwardly from the undersurfiace of the sole, the sole being folded intermediate its ends to define loops constituting the cleats, said loops having opposed Walls, and first securing means holding the opposed walls of the loops in contact with each other, each of said cleats being continuous and extending the full width of the sole, and an inner sole of absorbent textile material secured upon the outer sole, said inner sole comprising an absorbent textile material envelope having a filling of compressible absorbent material.

6. An anti-skid shoe structure comprising an outer sole composed of layers of absorbent textile material secured together, and cleats extending across and extending downwardly from the undersurface of the sole, each of said cleats being continuous and extending the full width of the outer sole and being folded intermediate its ends to define loops constituting the cleats and hav- 4 ing opposed Walls, and first securing means holding the opposed Walls of the loops in contact with each other, and an inner sole of absorbent textile material secured upon the outer sole, said inner sole comprising an absorbent textile material envelope having a filling of compressible absorbent material, and a shoe body having a peripheral edge, said peripheral edge being inserted between and secured to the inner sole and the outer sole.

7. An anti-skid shoe sole structure comprising an outer sole composed of layers of absorbent textile material secured together, and cleats extending across and extending downwardly from the undersurface of the sole, the sole being folded intermediate its ends to define loops constituting the cleats, said loops having opposed walls, and first securing means holding the opposed walls of the loops in contact with each other, each of said cleats being continuous and extending the full width of the sole, said first securing means comprising horizontal stitching extending back and forth through the walls of the loops, said horizontal stitching indenting the walls of the loops immediately adjacent to the undersurface of tie outer sole, and rows of vertical stitching extending through the layers of the outer sole at the opposite sides of the loops and at the locations of the indentations.

8. An anti-skid shoe sole structure comprising an outer sole composed of layers of absorbent textile material secured together, and cleats extending across and extending downwardly from the undersurface of the sole, the sole being folded intermediate its ends to define loops constituting the cleats, said loops having opposed Walls, and first securing means holding the opposed walls of the loops in contact with each other, each of said cleats being continuous and extending the full width of the sole, and an inner sole of absorbent textile material secured upon the outer sole, said inner sole comprising a plurality of layers of absorbent textile material, and second securing means at opposite sides of the loops and extending through the layers of the outer sole and the layers of the inner sole.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,564,060 Grosjean Dec. 1, 1925 2,189,489 Fritz Feb. 6, 1940 2,685,141 Davenport Aug. 3, 1954 FOREIGN PATENTS 511,975 France Oct. 2, 920

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1564060 *Sep 13, 1923Dec 1, 1925Grosjean James ESole for boots and shoes
US2189489 *Feb 14, 1939Feb 6, 1940Fritz John JAntislipping shoe
US2685141 *Sep 20, 1951Aug 3, 1954Davenport Pearl NAntiskid attachment for shoes
FR511975A * Title not available
Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification36/59.00C, D02/961, 36/30.00R
International ClassificationA43B13/12, A43B13/14, A43B13/02, A43B13/22
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/226, A43B13/12, A43B13/223
European ClassificationA43B13/22B, A43B13/12, A43B13/22B2