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Publication numberUS3111121 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 19, 1963
Filing dateJan 26, 1961
Priority dateJan 26, 1961
Publication numberUS 3111121 A, US 3111121A, US-A-3111121, US3111121 A, US3111121A
InventorsBaggott Edmund W
Original AssigneeIdeal Toy Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy air rifle
US 3111121 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

- Nov. 19, 1963 E. w. BAGGOTT TOY AIR RIFLE 3 sheets -sheet 1 Filed Jan. 26. 1961 iii uU Nov. 19, 19673 E. w. BAGGOTT TOY AIR RIFLE 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 26. 1961 HUGQWVMV :h

IN VEN TOR. A a/wanna Mfin qor BY M hf Nov. 19, 1963 E. w. BAGGOTT TOY AIR RIFLE Filed Jan. 26. 1961 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 FIG. ll

United States Patent 3,111,121 TOY AIR RIFLE Edmund W. Baggott, Hollis, N.Y., assignor to Ideal Toy Corporation, Hollis, N .Y., a corporation of New York Filed Jan. 26, 1961, Ser. No. 85,074 2 Claims. (Cl. 12415) This invention relates generally to pneumaticallyoperated missile-propelling devices, and more particularly to a bolt action toy air rifle.

Various types of air guns have been developed in the past which are employed for projecting missiles of different types. The missiles may be dart-like members which may be provided with suction cups at the end thereof, or various small size projectiles such as shot or the like have been employed. In order for a toy air rifle to bring an optimum amount of pleasure to a child, the toy air rifle should have the general appearance and function of a conventional rifle. Therefore, the toy air rifle should employ projectiles which are similar to cartridges used in conventional explosive-actuated weapons. Conventional explosive cartridges are formed in two parts, including a case and a bullet head, with the case being ejected from the weapon and the bullet head being propelled by the explosive in the case. The cartridges are usually contained in a magazine and the cartridges are fed into the chamber of the conventional rifle.

It is the object of the present invention to provide a toy air rifle of novel construction which simulates the function of a conventional rifle employing explosive cartridges.

In carrying out the invention there is provided a toy cartridge formed in two parts including a simulated bullet head which is detachably secured to a case. The case is open at both ends in order to permit air, which is used in propelling the bullet head, to pass therethrough into communication with the bullet head for propelling the latter.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a toy air rifle which employs a magazine for storing and placing a cartridge within the firing train of the air gun and which employs a bolt action for feeding each successive shell from the magazine and delivering it to the firing chamber.

A novel trigger-actuated clamp arrangement is employed in the invention for facilitating the compression of a spring which drives a piston within a cylinder for delivering the compressed air used in impelling the bullet head. A further feature of the invention is the novel arrangement of :a movable cylinder within the casing of this air gun which cylinder has a tubular extension provided with a resilient ring at the end thereof for engaging each successive cartridge and forming an air seal therewith while being used for pushing the cartridges into the loading tray.

A further object of the invention is to provide means for ejecting the case of each cartridge in a realistic manner after propelling each bullet head.

In carrying out the invention, an air gun is constructed of any suitable material such as wood, metal, or synthetic plastic materials, or any combination thereof. The air gun includes a casing having a cylinder slidably mounted therein. A barrel is secured to the casing. The cylinder is provided with a tubular extension slidably movable in the casing in alignment with the barrel from a position spaced from the barrel, which cylinder extension is designed to carry successively cartridges from a magazine into a loading tray. There is a piston in the cylinder and a piston rod attached to the piston extending outwardly of the cylinder. The piston rod is provided with an enlarged head engaged by a clamping arrangement including two clamping jaws which are urged together by a spring so as to prevent movement of the cylinder head and hence of the piston as the cylinder moves, thus compressing a spring engaging the piston in the cylinder. A trigger is provided with a cylindrical member which upon trigger actuation, engages legs depending from the jaws of the clamping arrangement to spread the jaws and release the enlarged. head, thereby releasing the piston and permitting the spring to urge the piston through the cylinder to compress the air and impel the bullet head. Each cartridge is provided with a hollow case through which the air from the cylinder flows after passing through the tubular extension. The bullet ead itself is hollow and is of such configuration as to fly quite truly, so that the toy gun can be used in tests of accuracy. The cartridge is of a relatively light weight and comparatively large size while being smooth in exterior configuration, thereby being quite harmless.

Still further objects and features of this invention reside in the provision of an air gun that is simple is construction, easy to manufacture by mass production methods, strong and durable, and highly attractive in appearance, thereby affording considerable pleasure and play value as a toy for children.

These, together with the various ancillary objects and features of the invention, which will become apparent as the following description proceeds, are attained by this toy air rifle, a preferred embodiment of which has been illustrated in the accompanying drawings, by way of example only, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of the air rifle made in accordance with the present invention with a portion thereof being broken away to show details of construction;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the toy air rifle;

FIG. 3 is a side elevational View in an enlarged scale of the magazine utilized in the present invention, with a portion thereof being broken away to show other parts in section and in detail;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged top plan view of the magazine taken along the plane of line 4-4 in FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged exploded elevational view of one of the cartridges utilized in the invention;

FIG. 6 is a longitudinal sectional view of one of the cartridges as taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged partial longitudinal sectional view of the toy air rifle, shown with the various operating elements in an initial position in which the cylinder extension is ready to load one of the cartridges onto the loading tray;

FIG. 8 is a sectional detail view similar to that of FIG. 7 but illustrating the various elements of the gun in a cocked position;

FIG. 9 is a sectional detail view similar to FIGS. 7 and 8, but illustrating the position of the various elements of the invention after the trigger has been actuated and the enlarged head released;

FIG. 10 is an enlarged horizontal sectional view taken along the plane of line 10-10 in FIG. 1, illustrating the ejector mechanism;

FIG. 11 is a transverse sectional detail view taken along the plane of line 11-11 in FIG. 9 and further illustrating the construction of the ejector;

FIG. 12 is an enlarged vertical sectional view taken along the plane of line 1212 in FIG. 8 and illustrating the internal construction of the rifle casing and various associated parts;

FIG. 13 is a partial perspective view illustrating the construction of the bolt action mechanism;

FIG. 14 is an enlarged transverse sectional View taken along the plane of line 14-14 in FIG. 8 and illustrating in particular the construction of the clamp means shown in a cocked position;

FIG. 15 is a view similar to FIG. 14 but showing the manner in which the trigger opens the clamping arrangement to release the enlarged head for propelling the bullet head;

FIG. 16 is an enlarged sectional view taken along the plane of line 1616 in FIG. 8, further illustrating construction of the clamping arrangement; and

FIG. 17 is an enlarged sectional detail view taken along the plane of line 1717 in FIG. 14, illustrating the construction of the enlarged head and showing the cam means on the enlarged head for spreading apart the clamping jaws during cocking of the air gun.

With continuing reference to the accompanying drawings wherein like reference numerals designate similar parts throughout the various views, reference numeral 28 generally designates the toy air rifle or like weapon incorporating the present invention which may be constructed out of various readily available materials such as metal, wood or various synthetic plastic materials such as polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, polyurethane or polystyrene and the like. The rifle 28 includes a stock 22, on which there is mounted a cylinder 24 to which a barrel 26 is attached. A magazine 28 containing a plurality of cartridges 30 is detachably secured within a magazine holder 32 for successively feeding the cartridges 3%).

Referring particularly to FIGS. 3 through 6, it will be noted that the magazine 28 includes front and rear walls 34 and 36 interconnected by spaced side walls 38 and 40. The end walls 34 and 36 terminate short of the upper edges 42 and 44 of the side walls 38 and 40, which upper edges 42 and 44 are inwardly turned toward each other to retain the cartridges 30 within the magazine while permitting said cartridges to be pressed into the rear open end 46 of the magazine when filling the latter, and for permitting the cartridges 30 to pass out of the front magazine opening 48. A slide 50 is mounted in the magazine 38 and a spring 52 is provided for urging the slide 50 upwardly against the cartridges in the magazine 28, so that the uppermost cartridge bears against the inturned edges 42 and 44 and is in registry with the front magazine opening 48.

The magazine 28 is provided with a bottom plate 56 extending laterally beyond the side Walls 34 and 36 to form a stop for engaging the bottom edges of the magazine holder 32 to hold the magazine in its proper loaded position.

As shown in FIGS. and 6, each of the cartridges 38 includes a bullet head 62 having a rear open end 64 and a hemi-spherical closed front end 66. Of course, the front end 66 may be of an ogive shape or any other desired shape. The other part of the cartridge 30 is in the form of a hollow case 70 having a front end 68 of reduced cross section sized to fit snugly Within the rear open end 64 of the bullet head 62 so as to detachably hold the bullet head 62 thereon. The front end 68 of the case 70 is open as is the rear end 72. This permits air directed through the rear end 72 of the case 70 to be forcibly directed against the inner surface of the bullet head closed front end 66 for propulsion of the bullet head. The main body portion 74 of case 70 is of a greater cross-sectional dimension than the bullet head 62 and is provided adjacent its rear end 72 with a peripheral groove 76 forming a shoulder 78 against which an ejector mechanism can hear. The end 72 is provided with a rounded camming edge as at 80.

As can be seen best in FIGS. 7 through 9, the rifle casing 24 contains most of the toy air rifle. Mounted within the casing 24 is a cylinder 82 having an extension 84 which is tubular in shape and provided with a through passageway 86 which communicates with the interior of the cylinder 82. A resilient ring 87 is provided on the end of the extension 84. A piston 88 is mounted in the cylinder 82 for compressing the air in the cylinder 82 and forcing the compressed air through the passageway 86 and thence through the cartridge case 70 into the bullet head 62.

The rifle barrel 26 has a longitudinal bore 90 which receives the forward end of the cartridge 38 to be fired, and guides the fixed bullet head 62 during its passage from the rifle. The cylinder 82 is movably mounted within the casing 24 for carrying successive cartridges 30 from the magazine 28 to the bore 90 and also to provide an air sealed engagement between the cylinder extension 84 and the cartridge 30 which is seated in bore 90. This movable mounting of cylinder 82 within casing 24 is provided by a bolt ring 92 at the forward end of the cylinder 82 and a bearing ring 162 at the rear end of cylinder 82, both of which are sized to make a loose slide fit with the inner surface of casing 24.

The bolt ring 92 is turnably mounted on the forward end of the cylinder 82 between an annular flange secured to the cylinder extension 84 and a stop member 93 secured to said cylinder 82. Thus, while the bolt ring 92 may be turned relative to the cylinder 82, it cannot move along the length of said cylinder, and thus when the bolt ring 92 is thrust forwardly or rearwardly, it will carry the cylinder 82 with it.

A bolt 94, secured to or formed integrally with the bolt ring 92, extends through a bolt slot 96 formed in the easing 24. The bolt 94 is adapted to be manually slid in a forward direction for loading and cocking the rifle, and in a rearward direction for ejecting the spent cartridge cases.

Within casing 24 is a transverse partition having a central circular opening 112 therein and having an upper slot 114 communicating with the opening 112. The opening 112 is in alignment with the bore 90 in the barrel 26. The partition 110 divides the forward portion of casing 24 into a magazine chamber 113 and a cartridge feed chamber 115.

Also in alignment With the bore 90 is a loading tray 118 which extends substantially between the opening 112 and the bore 98. The front end of loading tray 118 is seated in the barrel 26 and secured thereto. The rear wall of barrel 26 is recessed as at 120 above the loading tray 118. The loading tray is of arcuate cross-section, as seen best in FIGS. 10 and 11, and is sized to receive and guide a cartridge 30 being fed to the rifle bore 90. It is also provided with rectangular slot 122 therein. A spring ejector member 124 is fixed at one end to the outer surface of the loading tray 118 and has at its free end a hook portion 126 projecting beyond the surface of tray 118 and adapted to engage the case 70 of the cartridge for ejecting the latter in a manner to be presently described.

The rifle mechanism also includes an extractor member in the form of a lever 1-36 pivotally mounted intermediate its ends on the cylinder extension 84 by means of a pin 130 mounted in a trunnion 132 aflixed to cylinder extension 84 and extending through a lug 134 carried by the lever 136. The forward end of lever 136 is formed with a hook 138 positioned and adapted to engage the shoulder 78 of a cartridge case 70. A spring 142 is affixed between the cylinder extension 84 and the rear end 144 of the lever 136 for urging said rear end 144 in an upward direction and thereby urging the hook 138 downwardly so that it extends partially over the face of the sealing ring '87, as shown in FIG. 7. The hook 138 is provided with a forward cam surface for riding over the rounded edge 80 of the end 72 of a cartridge case 70, thereby lifting the extractor member 136 against the action of the spring 142.

As previously indicated, the cylinder 82 contains a piston 88 which creates the air pressure for operation of the rifle. A piston rod 151} is secured to and extends through the end wall 152 of the cylinder 82'. The piston rod 158 is rectangular in cross section and at its rear end carries an enlarged head 156 which is of greater diameter than the cylinder 82 and which has a truncated, conicallyshaped portion 158 forming a cam surface 160. The bearing plate 162, which is fixed to end wall 152 of cylinder 82, has a plurality of openings 164 in the periphery thereof to permit passage of air therethrough, as can be best seen in FIG. 12. The piston rod 150 extends through the plate 162 and also through the rear end wall 166 of casing 24. The casing rear end wall 166 has an opening 167 there-in of sufiicient size to permit the head 156 to pass freely the-rethrough. Disposed between the piston 88 and the cylinder end wall 152 is a coil spring 170.

In order to retain the enlarged head 156 behind the casing rear end wall 166, there is provided a clamping arrangement 172 which, as shown in FIGS. 14 through 16, includes a pair of arcuate latch jaws 176 and 178 respectively pivoted by pins 180 and 182 to the rear end wall 166 of casing 24. An arcuate strip spring 184 is disposed about the jaws 176 and 178 and is of generally an inverted U-shaped, closely embracing said jaws. The spring 184 urges the jaws 176 and 178 toward each other in such a manner that the space between the jaws 176 and 178 is normally less than the diameter of the enlarged head 156, preventing the passage of said enlarged head 156 therebetween. The jaws 176 and 178 have respective integral, depending legs 186 and 188 provided at their inner edges with cam surfaces 191) and 192 which are adapted to be engaged by a trigger mechanism 191.

The trigger mechanism 191 comprises a trigger lever 198 mounted by pivot pin 202 between a pair of depending trigger plates 204 secured to the cylinder 24. The free end of trigger lever 198 is formed with a finger piece 298'. The lever 198 has an integral arm 196 which carries a cylindrical bar 194 serving as a cam. The stock 22 includes a portion 288 which partially covers over and conceals the trigger mechanism. When the trigger finger piece 206 is pulled rearwardly, the lever arm 196 turns in a clockwise direction, as viewed in FIGS. 79, moving the cylindrical bar or cam 194 upwardly between the cam surfaces 190 and 192 of jaws 176 and 178, thereby spreading apart the legs 186 and 188 as well as the jaws 176 and 178. As shown in FIG. 15, the cylindrical bar or cam 194 is sized to spread apart jaws 176 and 178 to such an extent that the distance therebetween is greater than the diameter of the enlarged head 156, whereby the latter is released for forward movement when the trigger mechanism is actuated.

As was previously explained, the bolt 94 may be drawn through the slot 96 to load the rifle and to eject the spent cartridge. As best seen in FIGS. 2 and 13, the slot 96 has a lateral extension 220 at its rear end which receives and locks the bolt 94 in its retracted position, permitting a slight turning movement of the bolt ring 92. At its forward end, the slot 96 has an arcuately and downwardlyextending portion 222 which seems to enable the bolt to be locked in a cocked position. In moving through this slot extension portion 222, the bolt 94 moves the bolt ring 92 in a free turning movement about the cylinder 82 without corresponding turning movement of the latter.

At its forward end, the casing 24 has a top inspection opening 104 and a side cartridge case ejection opening 186, both of which communicate with the cartridge feed chamber 115. An arcuate closure plate 102 is aifixed to the flange 108 of the cylinder extension 84 and extends forwardly to the forward end of said cylinder extension 84. In the retracted position of the bolt 94 shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the closure plate 102 underlies and covers over the bolt slot 96. In the forward position of the bolt 94, shown in FIGS. 8 and 9, the closure plate 182 underlies and covers over the inspection opening 104 and ejection opening 186.

In operation of the air rifle 28, the user loads the magazine 28 with a selected number of cartridges 30 by inserting said cartridges successively into the top open end of said magazine. The loaded magazine 28 is then slid upwardly into the magazine holder 32 until the bottom plate 56 engages the bottom edge of said magazine holder and is stopped thereby. This positions the uppermost cartridge 30 of the magazine within the magazine chamber 113 in axial alignment with the cylinder extension 84 and also with the barrel bore 90, as shown in FIG, 7. The bolt 94, of course is in its retracted position.

To load the rifle, the bolt is turned upwardly in the rear slot extension 220 and is then slid forwardly in the slot 96. In this forward movement, the bolt 96 carries forwardly with it the bolt ring 92, the cylinder 82 and the cylinder extension 84. As the forward end of the cylinder extension 84 moves into engagement with the uppermost cartridge 30 of magazine 28, the cam surface 140 of hook 138 engages the rear rounded edge of the cartridge case 70, causing the extract-or lever 136 to pivot about pin 130 so that the hook 138 passes over the rear end of cartridge case 70 and snaps :into the groove '76. The hook 138 thus grasps the cartridge case 70 under the biasing force of spring 142. The hook 133 holds the cartridge 30 against the resilient ring 87 with the cylinder extension passageway 86 in communication with the hollow interior of cartridge casing 70 through the rear open end 72 of said casing.

As bolt 94 continues to move forwardly, the cylinder extension 84 carries the cartridge 30 onto the loading tray 118, the latter guiding the cartridge accurately into the mouth 'of barrel bore 90. The barrel bore 90 has a rear portion of enlarged diameter which forms with the main portion of bore 90 a shoulder 91 as shown in FIGS. 7-9. The shoulder 91 engages the forward portion of the cartridge case 70, as shown in FIG. 8,. to prevent said cartridge case from sliding further inwardly through the barrel bore 90. Thus, while the smaller bullet head 62 can be fired through bore 90, the cartridge case 70 is retained in the loaded position of FIG. 8 with its rear end projecting outwardly of said bore 90. When the bolt 94 is turned downwardly through the forward slot extension portion 222 to lock it in cocked position, it presses the cylinder extension 84 forcibly against the loaded cartridge case 70 so that an airtight seal is formed between the resilient ring 87 and the rear open end 72 of said cartridge case. The rear end of barrel 26 is formed with a recess adjacent the bore 90, which recess 120 provides clearance for the forward end of hook 138 when the bolt is in cocked position.

Forward movement of the bolt 94 to its cocked position also primes the firing mechanism of the rifle. In the inoperative or unloaded position of FIG. 7, the piston 88 is located at the forward end of the cylinder 82. When the bolt 94 is slid forwardly, it carries the cylinder 82 forwardly, but the piston remains immovable because the enlarged head 156 is held by the latch jaws 176 and 178. In the cocked position of the bolt, shown in FIG. 8, the cylinder 82 has moved relative to piston 88 to such an extent that the piston is located at the rear end of said cylinder. The spring is tightly c0mpressed between the piston 88 and the rear wall 152 of cylinder 82, and the rifle is loaded, cocked and ready for firing.

The user may now squeeze the trigger in the usual manner by applying rearward pressure on the finger piece 280. This raises the cylindrical bar or cam 194 between the depending jaw legs 186 and. 188, spreading apart the latch jaws 176 and 178 and releasing the enlarged head 156 for passage therebetween and through the opening 167 into the casing 24. The compressed spring 170 thereupon urges the piston 88 rapidly and with considerable force, forwardly along the length of cylinder 82. As the piston 88 travels toward the front end of cylinder 82, it compresses the air within said cylinder and forces this compressed air through the bore 86 of cylinder extension 84, past the air seal formed by resilient ring 87 and through the open-ended loaded cartridge case 70 and against the inner front surface of the hollow bullet head 62. The bullet head 62 is thus 7 separated from its cartridge case 70 and is forcibly propelled by air pressure through barrel bore 90, as indicated by the arrow in FIG. 9, and leaves the rifle to fly in its trajectory to the target.

After the rifle is fired, the trigger is released, causing the spring-urged latch jaw legs 186 and 188 to cam the cylindrical bar 194 downwardly and thereby cause the trigger lever 198 to pivot to its original position of FIG. 1. The latch jaws 176 and 178 are also urged by spring 184 toward each other and back to their holding position of FIG. 14. The user then unlocks the bolt 94 by raising it in the forward slot extension portion 222, and slides it rearwardly in slot 96 toward its retracted position. As the cylinder extension 84 and its extractor lever 136 are moved rearwardly with the bolt, the hook 138 is still engaged with the spent cartridge case 70 and draws said case out of the bore 9% and rearwardly along loading tray 118. When the cartridge case 70 reaches the rear end of the tray 118, its rear end is engaged by the hook portion 126 of the ejector member 124, and said hook portion 124 causes said cartridge case 70 to tip out of its axial alignment with the rifle in the manner shown in FIG. 10. The tilted case 70 strikes the partition 110, is released from the hook 138, and is tumbled through the ejection opening 106, so that it is ejected from the rifle in a realistic manner.

When the bolt 94 is drawn back to its retracted position, the piston 88, piston rod 156 and enlarged head 156 are carried rearwardly with the cylinder 82. As the bolt 94 approaches its retracted position, the truncated portion '158 of head 156 passes between the latch jaws 176 and 178, and its cam surface 160 spreads apart said latch jaws to permit the enlarged head 156 to pass entirely therethrough. The jaws 176 and 178 then snap toward each other behind the enlarged head 156 to lock the latter in the retained position of FIG. 1, and the rifle is again set for loading and firing by repeating the procedure previously described.

The rifle 20* may be provided with various additional details of construction which enable it to simulate weapons using explosive shells. For example, various types of knurled or decorative surfaces as at 240, 242, and 244 may be provided. Further, the cylinder 24 may be provided with a suitable cover extension 248 and an end wall 250. Vent openings as at 252 may be provided in the casing 24 to permit freedom of movement of the cylinder =82 and associated bearing rings 92 and 162 therein. In addition, the end of the barrel 26 may be provided with a portion of enlarged cross sectional area 253 and a trigger guard 260 may be installed.

While preferred embodiments of the invention have been shown and described herein, it is obvious that numerous additions, changes and omissions may be made in such embodiments without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

What I claim is: I 1. An air gun comprising a casing, a barrel secured to said casing, a cylinder slidably mounted in said casing,

a tubular cylinder extension fixed to said cylinder and 30 slidably movable in said casing into alignment with and adjacent said barrel from a position spaced from said barrel, said cylinder extension having an end provided with a resilient ring, said casing having an opening therein, a magazine detachably secured to said casing in said opening, a plurality of cartridges in said magazine, each or" said cartridges including a hollow bullet head and a case, said case having opposite ends, both said ends being open, said bullet head being detachably secured to said case, said magazine successively supporting said cartridges in alignment with said barrel and engageable with said resilient ring on said cylinder extension for forming an air seal communicating said cylinder with said bullet head and for movement therewith, a piston in said cylinder, a piston rod attached to said piston and extending outwardly of said cylinder, spring means in said cylinder normally urging said piston towards said extension, releasable means in said casing for holding said piston rod against movement so as to compress said spring means, and extractor means mounted on said cylinder extension and engageable with said case for holding said case against said resilient ring in communication with said cylinder.

2. An air gun comprising a casing, a barrel secured to said casing, a cylinder slidably mounted in said casing, a tubular cylinder extension fixed to said cylinder and slidably movable in said casing into alignment with and adjacent said barrel from a position spaced from said barrrel, said cylinder extension having an end provided with a resilient ring, said casing having an opening therein, a magazine detachably secured to said casing in said opening, a plurality of cartridges in said magazine, each of said cartridges including a hollow bullet head and a case, said case having opposite ends, both said ends being open, said bullet head being detachably secured to said case, said magazine successively supporting said cartridges in alignment with said barrel and engageable with said resilient ring on said cylinder extension for forming an air seal communicating said cylinder with said bullet head and for movement therewith, a piston in said cylinder, a piston rod attached to said piston and extending outwardly of said cylinder, spring means in said cylinder normally urging said piston towards said extension, releasable means in said casing for holding said piston rod against movement so as to compress said spring means, extractor means mounted on said cylinder extension and engageable with said case for holding said case against said resilient ring in communication with said cylinder, and ejector mean-s connected to the barrel for engaging said case upon movement of said cylinder extension and said extractor means away from said barrel.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 507,470 Bailey Oct. 24, 1893 1,730,201 Foss Oct. 1, 1929 2,449,187 Waters Sept. 14, 1948 2,630,795 Peters Mar. 10, 1953 2,825,324 Haas Mar. 4, 1958 2,921,573 Horowitz et al Jan. 19, 1960 FOREIGN PATENTS 463,491 Italy May 7, 1951

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Referenced by
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US3339536 *Apr 16, 1965Sep 5, 1967Marvin Glass & AssociatesToy cannon with separable front and rear barrel sections
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US8875689 *Oct 14, 2011Nov 4, 2014Buzz Bee Toys (H.K.) Company LimitedApparatus and method for detecting the dart in a barrel of a toy gun
US8875690 *Oct 14, 2011Nov 4, 2014Buzz Bee Toys (H.K.) Company LimitedToy gun
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US20120285433 *Oct 14, 2011Nov 15, 2012Ma Chor-MingToy Gun
US20120285436 *Oct 14, 2011Nov 15, 2012Ma Chor-MingApparatus and Method for Detecting the Dart in a Barrel of a Toy Gun
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Classifications
U.S. Classification124/67, 124/52, 124/44.7
International ClassificationF41A15/12, F41A15/00, F41B11/00, F41B11/02, F41B11/14
Cooperative ClassificationF41B11/55, F41A15/12, F41B11/642
European ClassificationF41B11/55, F41B11/642, F41A15/12