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Publication numberUS3111313 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 19, 1963
Filing dateMar 26, 1962
Priority dateMar 26, 1962
Publication numberUS 3111313 A, US 3111313A, US-A-3111313, US3111313 A, US3111313A
InventorsParks Kenneth E
Original AssigneeParks Kenneth E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Optical illusion walking game
US 3111313 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 19, 1963 K. E. PARKS OPTICAL ILLUSION WALKING GAME 2 sheetsfsheet l INVENTOR. KE/wvz TH E. Bnens BY Z Filed March 26, 1962 'ATTOR NE) Nov. 19, 1963 K. E. PARKS 3,111,313

OPTICAL ILLUSION WALKING GAME Filed March 26, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 a l 8 Q a k e m Q, is

Q v 'q H c s a l INVENTOR. a KENNETH E.FAR.K5

ii I a BYZ TT RNE) United States Patent 3,111,313 tETlCAL ELLUEBTGN WALKENG GAME Kenneth E. Parks, lontgomery, Ala. (1424 Querida Drive, Colorado Springs, Colo.) Filed Mar. 26, 1962, Ser. No. 182,334 2 Claims. ((31. 273-!) This invention relates to an opticfl illusion walking game. It has for its main objects to provide such a game that will be highly satisfactory for the purpose intended, requiring simple parts for its operation, and having rules easy to understand.

The game is carried on by the player walking along lines or trails shown on pictures on rugs, mats or the like placed upon a floor and being of suflicient size for the player to look at sme through the wrong end of a low powered telescope, binocular or any substitute therefor that will cause an optical illusion such as double eye glasses.

Other objects and advantages will appear from the drawings and specification.

By referring generally to the drawings it will be ob served that:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a trail picture upon a mat, and also showing part of a building at one end.

'FIG. 2 is a plan view of a low powered telescope with a hood structure attached.

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view of the telescope.

FIG. 4 is a plan view of a picture upon a mat showing a straight line of numbered blocks, and curved lines of numbered blocks or spaces, and V-shaped lines with num bered spaces.

FIG. 5 is a plan View of a binocular.

FIG. 6 is a side elevational "view of binocular.

Similar reference numerals refer to similar parts throughout the several views.

Referring to the drawings in detail it will be seen that the parts for playing the game comprise a piece of cloth 1 or the like or plastic formed as a rug approximately four by ten feet in size having a picture thereon showing a curved trail 2 and part of a building 3; and another similar rug 4 having a picture thereon showing a straight path 5 divided into eight equal-in-length distances; and having a V-shaped path 6 divided into sixteen equal-in-length distances; and a curved path 7 having twenty-four equal-in-length distances. For use by players of the game a low powered telescope 8 is used, or a binocular field glass 9. A hood it is mounted on the telescope, and a hood 11 is mounted on the binocular to prevent players from looking at the rugs other than through the telescope or the binocular.

From the foregoing it will appear that a player of the game will be the winner if he or she by skill walks "ice farther along the marked distances on the two rugs, as the game is based upon the fact that it is extremely difficult for a person to walk along a line or course while looking at it through the Wrong end of a low powered telescope or binocular. Looking at ones feet and attempting to walk along the line while put-ting one foot directly in front of the other is similar to walking along a tightrope. The illusion of great height makes it exceptionally difiicult to maintain ones balance resulting in a great deal of twisting and other body movement to avoid getting off of the path.

The various parts for playing the game may be made of any material suitable tor the purpose. Also the parts may be made in different sizes and capacities.

While I have shown and described the preferred embodiment of my invention, 1 do not wish' to limit same to the exact and precise details of structure, and I reserve the right to make all modifications and changes so long as they remain within the scope of the invention and the following claims.

Having described my invention I claim:

1. An optical illusion walking game comprising, two comparatively oblong shaped mats made of fabric material, one of said mats having an integral picture thereon showing a curved trail and the top portion of a building, the other mat having an integral picture thereon showing a straight path divided into a plurality of equal distances, and also having a V-shaped path divided into a plurality of equal distances, and also having a curved path divided into a plurality of equal distances; a low powered telescope, a hood, this hood being attached to the telescope, this telescope being adapted for looking through its wrong end at said pictures.

2. An optical illusion walking game comprising two comparatively oblong shaped rugs, one of said rugs having an integral picture thereon showing a curved trail in the earth and the top portion of a building, the other rug having an integral picture thereon showing a straight path divided into a plurality of equal distances, and also having a V-shaped path divided into a plurality of equal distances, and also having a curved path divided into a plurality of equal distances; a low powered binocular field glass, a hood, this hood being attached to the binocular, this binocular being adapted for looking through its wrong end at said pictures.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 631,227 Peppard Aug. 15, 1899 2,291,104 Radzyner July 28, 1942 2,413,633 Jones Dec. 31, 1946 2,891,793 Mudry June 23, 19 59

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US631227 *Jun 13, 1898Aug 15, 1899Isaac H PeppardHoodwink.
US2291104 *May 17, 1940Jul 28, 1942Radzyner Samuel MAmusement device
US2413633 *May 3, 1945Dec 31, 1946Jones Clifton MArtificial landscape
US2891793 *Sep 26, 1957Jun 23, 1959Mudry Jack AGame field delineator
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3454279 *Apr 14, 1966Jul 8, 1969Milton Bradley CoApparatus for playing a game wherein the players constitute the game pieces
US4787631 *Nov 14, 1986Nov 29, 1988Erumsele Mary CAction game for children
US5711529 *Dec 7, 1995Jan 27, 1998Nielsen; Brent B.Mirror game
US6254101Apr 12, 1999Jul 3, 2001Interface, Inc.Floor game for team building
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/444, 472/59
International ClassificationA63H33/22
Cooperative ClassificationA63H33/22
European ClassificationA63H33/22