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Publication numberUS3111355 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 19, 1963
Filing dateFeb 12, 1962
Priority dateFeb 12, 1962
Publication numberUS 3111355 A, US 3111355A, US-A-3111355, US3111355 A, US3111355A
InventorsMiller Arthur H, Samburoff Serge N
Original AssigneeMiller Arthur H, Samburoff Serge N
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Missile electrical plug connector
US 3111355 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 19, 1963 s. N. SAMBUROFF ETAL 3,111,355

MISSILE ELECTRICAL PLUG CONNECTOR Filed Feb. 12, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 SERGE N. SAMBUROF F ARTHUR H. ILLER INVENTORS BY w W i g,

ATTORNEY S Nov. 19, 1963 s. N. SAMBUROFF ETAL 3,111,355

MISSILE ELECTRICAL PLUG CONNECTOR Filed Feb. 12, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 SERGE N. SAMBUROFF ARTHUR H. MILLER INVENTORS ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,111,355 MISSILE ELECTRICAL PLUG CONNECTGR Serge N. Sambulotf and Arthur H. Miller, Silver Spring,

Md., assignors to the United States of America as represented by the Secretary of the Navy Filed Feb. 12, 1962, Ser. No. 172,835 2 Claims. (Cl. 339-75) This invention relates to electrical connectors; more particularly, it relates to a plug and receptacle arrangement for electrically connecting an aerial missile and its booster.

Prior to launching an aerial missile, it is necessary to supply it with electrical energy for purposes of warm-up, setting of gyroscop es, and checking of electrical equipment therein. If the missile is a dual-stage Vehicle, electrical energy is generally supplied to the booster and through an electrical connecter to the missile. If the missile is tactical, there is no need for an electrical connection between the missile and booster during flight, but if a telemetering system is used the missile and booster must be electrically connected during flight. Since present missiles and missile handling equipment necessitate the electrical connector to be on the outside of the missile, it is essential that the connector be able to withstand the rigors of flight and to maintain the connection until separation of the missile and booster.

The present invention provides an electrical receptacle on the missile, and a plug on the booster fastened thereto by a toggle arrangement. When the plug is in operative position, the toggle is straight and is biased to prevent it from bending toward inoperative position. The amount of the bias force is suflicient to maintain the plug in operative position against the forces normally encountered during flight.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide an electrical connector for providing a connection between a missile and its booster.

Another object of the invention is to provide an electrical connector for a missile and booster that will maintain the connection during flight.

A further object of the invention is to provide an electrical connector for a missile and booster which will not interfere with existing missile structure and missile handling equipment.

Other objects and many of the attendant advantages of the present invention will be readily appreciated as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following detailed description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a side elevation, partially in section, of the electrical connector, shown with the plug detached;

FIG. 2 is a view similar to FIG. 1, but showing the plug engaged with the receptacle;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the connector in engaged position; and

FIG. 4 is a section on line 44 of FIG. 2 with the cable omitted for clarity.

Referring to the drawings, a missile is connected to a booster 12 by a clamp ring 14. Recessed in the aft end of a wing island 16 on the missile 10 is a housing 18 for receiving an electrical receptacle 20. A plug 22, adapted to mate with the female connector 20, is carried by the free end of a toggle arrangement 24 which is pivotally mounted at its other end on the booster 12.

The toggle arrangement 24 consists of two sections 26 and 28 of channel configuration in cross-section. The aft end of the section 28 is pivotally connected to fixed lugs 30 on the booster 12 by a pin 32, and the forward end is pivotally connected to the section 26 by pins 34. When the toggle is closed or in extended position, as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, the adjacent flat surfaces of the sections 3,1 1 1,355 Patented Nov. 19,1963

26 and 23 are engaged to limit further movement of the toggle. Secured by screws 35 to forward extensions 36 of the side walls of the forward section 26 is a collar 38 which houses the plug 22.

The wires which lead to the plug 22 are housed in a cable 4%) extending from the booster adjacent the lugs 30. The cable terminates within a ferrule 42 abutting the collar 38. Supporting the cable to maintain it between the walls of the toggle sections is a block 44 secured between the walls of the section 28 near the forward end thereof. To properly orient the plug within the collar 38, an indexing pin 46, integral with said plug, is provided to mate with a suitable slot 47 in the collar.

The housing 18 includes a hollow cylinder 48, the forward end of which is largely contained within the Wing island 16. Slidably mounted in the cylinder is a counterbored nut 50, the larger diameter bore of which is threaded to receive a threaded ferrule 52. Integral with the nut St) is a tube 54 extending from the smaller diameter bore of the nut forward into the wing island 16 for receiving a cable 56. A snap ring 58 is fixed in the cylinder 48 adjacent the end of the tube 54 to provide a stop for a bearing washer 60. Positioned between the nut 54 and the bearing washer 60 is a compression spring 62 encircling the tube 54 and urging the nut toward the open aft end of the cylinder 48. Integral with the forward end of the ferrule 52 is a collar 64 slidably disposed in the cylinder 48. The cylinder 48 is provided with an inwardly extending flange 66 for engaging the collar 64 to limit movement of said collar and the nut 50. The receptacle 2t) slidably engages the flange 66 and extends therebeyond in both its connected and disconnected positions. A keyway 68 is formed in the cylinder 48 for receiving a key 70 on the collar 64 to properly orient the receptacle 20 in the cylinder.

In practice, the electrical connection between the missile and booster is open until just prior to launching. The plug 22 can then be inserted into the receptacle 20 by pushing the receptacle into the cylinder 48 against the force of the spring 62 a distance suflicient to permit the plug to be aligned with the receptacle. During this operation, the collar 38 slightly pivots about screws 35 to facilitate the insertion of the plug. In this position the end of the receptacle would be approximately flush with the end of the cylinder 48, and the toggle arrangement 24 would be fully extended and parallel with the missile and booster axes. The plug and receptacle would be angularly aligned due to the initial orientation thereof by the indexing pin 46 of the plug, and by the key 70 of the receptacle. Upon releasing the receptacle from its fully recessed position, the spring will snap it into engagement with the plug to complete the connection. The plug and receptacle will then be in the position shown in FIG. 2.

When in the position shown in FIG. 2, the screws 35 and the pin 32 lie in a plane passing through the axis of the cylinder 48, while the pins 34 are positioned beneath that plane. Thus the force of the spring 62 will tend to move the toggle toward closed position, which movement is limited by engagement of the adjacent flat surfaces of the toggle sections 26 and 28. The section 28 is recessed, as indicated at 72, so that when in closed position it will not obstruct the outward movement of the clamp ring 14 at the time of separation of the missile and booster. The plug connection does not hamper the separation since the relative axial movement of the missile and booster permits the plug to be pulled out of the receptacle without having to overcome the force of the spring 62.

Obviously, many modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in the light of the above teachings. It is therefore to be understood that within the scope of the appended claims the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described.

What is claimed is:

1. A detachable electrical connector for electrically connecting two temporarily attached aerial vehicles, comprising first and second mating connector members, a toggle mechanism including a first section pivotally connected at one end to one of said aerial vehicles, a second section pivotally connected at one end to the other end of said first section, means for pivotally attaching said first mating conector member to the other end of said second section, the second of said mating connector members being mounted on the second of said aerial vehicles, a housing for receiving said second connector member, and means in said housing for urging said second connector toward said first connector member when said members are in mating engagement, whereby when the two sections are aligned the toggle mechanism will urge the detachable electrical connector to remain in an engaged, mated position, said sections being movable to a position at an angle to each other when said first mating member will become disengaged from said second mating member.

2. A detachable electrical connector for electrically connecting two temporarily attached aerial vehicles, comprising first and second mating connector members, a toggle mechanism including a first section pivotally connected at one end to one of said aerial vehicles, a second section pivotally connected to the first section, means for pivotally attaching said first mating connector member to the second section, said second connector member being mounted on the second of said aerial vehicles and including a housing, a counterbored nut slidably mounted in said housing, a mating connector element carried by the nut, spring means in said bore for urging said counterbored nut toward one end of said housing, and stop means fixing displacement limits for said slidably disposed counterbored nut and said mating connector element carried thereby, said spring means urging said mating connector element toward said first connector member when said connector members are in mating engagement, whereby when the sections are aligned, the spring and the toggle mechanism will maintain the connector engaged, said sections being movable to positions at an angle to each other for disengaging the mating connector members.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,955,273 Winkler Oct. 4, 1960 2,986,613 Figueira May 30, 1961 2,997,682 Grimes et al Aug. 22, 1961 3,072,021 Marcon Jan. 8, 1963 3,080,792 Johnson Mar. 12, 1963

Patent Citations
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US2955273 *Feb 11, 1957Oct 4, 1960Albert & J M Anderson Mfg CompElectrical connector
US2986613 *Mar 11, 1958May 30, 1961Liquidometer CorpLiquid fuel measuring system for aircraft drop tanks and electrical connector usabletherewith
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US3072021 *Feb 23, 1961Jan 8, 1963Marcon Lewis JMissile umbilical assembly
US3080792 *Apr 27, 1961Mar 12, 1963Johnson Carl TWarmup contactor for missile-booster type weapon
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3224335 *Feb 27, 1964Dec 21, 1965Garey Robert BUmbilical retract mechanism
US3518613 *Mar 27, 1968Jun 30, 1970Us NavyMissile umbilical cable
US3738220 *Apr 1, 1971Jun 12, 1973Us ArmyFlexible-fixed launch and aiming shoe/self releasing electrical and/or pyrotechnic connector for rockets
US3883209 *Jun 29, 1973May 13, 1975Us NavyMissile connector
US3893366 *Oct 29, 1973Jul 8, 1975Us NavyMissile launcher guide assembly
US3905669 *Dec 1, 1972Sep 16, 1975G & H TechnologyStructural alignment pin and electrical connector assembly
US3936123 *Oct 23, 1974Feb 3, 1976Gossett Willie PElectrical plug ejecting apparatus
US4196954 *Mar 28, 1979Apr 8, 1980SocapexUnlocking and extracting device for an electrical connector
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US5710388 *Aug 12, 1996Jan 20, 1998The Whitaker CorporationUmbilical cord for projectile launching device
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US7645162 *Jan 24, 2008Jan 12, 2010Tyco Electronics CorporationConnector assembly having a slider element
Classifications
U.S. Classification439/159, 439/164, 439/296, 439/310, 439/180, 89/1.811
International ClassificationH01R13/631
Cooperative ClassificationH01R13/631
European ClassificationH01R13/631