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Publication numberUS3111970 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 26, 1963
Filing dateMay 26, 1961
Priority dateMay 26, 1961
Publication numberUS 3111970 A, US 3111970A, US-A-3111970, US3111970 A, US3111970A
InventorsEwig Jr John F, Lou Priest Emmy
Original AssigneeEwig Jr John F, Lou Priest Emmy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tapered sabre saw blade
US 3111970 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 26, 1963 D. E. PRIEST ETAL 3,111,970

TAPERED SABRE SAW BLADE Filed May 26, 1961 j Tp--i T WEA/foes United States Patent ii ice 3,111,970 Patented Nov. 26, 1963 3,111,970` TAPERED SABRE SAW BLADE Dwight E. Priest, deceased, late of Southborough, Mass.,

by Emmy Lou Priest, executrix, Love Lane, Southborough, Mass., and- J h11 F. Ewig, Jr., Worcester, Mass.

Filed May 26, 1961, Ser. No. 113,037 4 Claims. (Cl. 143-433) This invention relates' to a tapered sabre saw blade, so-called because its front end is usually pointed and is unsupported. Such a blade is usually used in a jig saw machine in a vertically reciprocating sawing stroke, but in starting a hole particularly, the blade may be used at an inclined angle. The blade may be used in cutting hard materials, such as metals, but is primarily intended to be used in cutting softer material, such as wood, plywood, plastic and the like. The same saw blade construction, however, can be used in a blade supported at both ends, as in a hack saw blade, and our invention is not limited in that respect. But for purposes of illustration we show our invention embodied in a sabre saw blade.

In all saw blades, clearance or space between the cutting edges of the teeth must be provided to permit chip clearance. Chip clearance is necessary for the saw to cut. Otherwise the saw merely binds in the kerf or cut being made in the material. Various methods have been employed to provide this necessary chip clearance, such as setting or alternate bending of the teeth laterally, and providing various shapes for the saw teeth. But when tooth clearance is secured by laterally projecting the tooth points, these points quickly wear away and proper clearance is lost. Further such laterally projecting points do not give a clean cut along the side walls of the kerf, tendinc to tear the material being cut to give clearance, and often deect the saw from a straight line of cutting.

We have sought to overcome the defects and disadvantages of prior saw blades, and after experimenting with a great many shapes and forms of blades and teeth., we have designed a novel shape of sawtooth and blade, which provides great strength for the saw and teeth, proper chip clearance, and uniform cutting by all of the teeth on each of their sides and which permits the saw to be driven with less power, and with less wear and tear on the teeth.

We achieve our results by providing a saw blade formed from a blank having a thickened edge portion, on which flat cutting teeth are provided extending the width of the edge portion, and which taper slightly on their sides to a longitudinal ridge, or line more than half way down the teeth from the top to the bottom or gullet thereof and which then taper to substantially greater degree in a radial or concave taper extending to a point below the bottom or gullet of the teeth, at which point the taper is blended into the gradual taper of the rest of the saw blade. It will be understood that the remaining taper of the blade, as shown in FIG. 2, is unnecessary-and is desirable chiefly to prevent binding of the saw blade on the kerf and to permit the blade to cut in circles. The gradual tapering, from the top of the teeth, and then substantially greater radial or concave tapering of the blade below the midpoint of the teeth in the external contour give the blade great strength, and this shape of the blade and teeth provide superior chip clearance and superior cuttin g performance.

The advantages of our saw blade over the conventional set tooth type of saw blade are:

(l) The teeth are all even as far as width is concerned so every tooth does an equal amount of work. This' is never true in a set-tooth blade because it is impossible to set teeth accurately enough to have each tooth do the same amount of work.

(2) As a result of this uniformity in tooth width, greater strength and longer life in our teeth is obtained, because every tooth is carrying the same load.

(3) The teeth cut faster for every tooth is doing an equal amount of work.

(4) Also the slot cut or kerf is narrower as there is no need to put a set on the teeth-and the narrower the cut the easier it is to cut.

(5) With every tooth doing the same amount of work as all the other teeth, a smooth cut or kerf is obtained.

(6) The slight taper and then the substantially increased radial taper, blending into the remaining taper to the back of the blade in addition to providing great strength, permits' the gullet in the teeth to be placed low enough to provide adequate chip clearance.

Other features, advantages, objects and purposes of our invention will appear from a detailed description of the embodiment thereof, illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. l is a side elevation of a saw blade shank illustrating our invention, inverted with respect to its usualV cutting position, and

FIG. 2 is a vertical section of the saw blade shank shown in FIG. 1, taken along the line 2-2 of FIG. l.

As shown in the drawings a saw blade shank 10 has thereon a plurality of cutting teeth 12 arranged in a row along one edge 14 of the said shank 10. Each of' the teeth 12 has a leading face 16 and a trailing face 18, regarding the forward direction of sawing to be that in which the saw blade shank 10 is pushed by force exerted on its handle (not shown) from the end 20 of the said shank 10, toward the point of the saw blade.

The shape of the teeth are more or less conventional depending on the hardness of the material to be cut, and the speed and power with which thecutting is to be done. The leading face 16 of each tooth 12 is inclined upwardly perierably not more than 45 from the horizontal (or the tangent at its tip of cutting edge 22 to its usual sawpath). This insures that the force of the tangential component of the resistance of the material being cut (not shown) is never greater than the perpendicular component thereof, with respect to the usual path of cutting, thus protecting the saw teeth 12 against being broken olf thereby. The more nearly horizontal the said leading face 16 is, the less the likelihood of a tooth 12 being broken off, other facts being constant; on the other hand, cutting efliciency may be correspondingly reduced. The trailing tooth face 18 is preferably inclined inwardly slightly beyond the perpendicular to the cutting path, as shown with reference to the perpendicular line 2-2 on FIG. l, and blends into the bottom portion of the leading edge 16 at the gullet 30.

As' stated above, the superior results achieved by our blade reside in the outside cross-sectional shape, or contour of our blade as shown in FIG. 2 of the drawing. The saw blade is formed from a blank having a thickened outer edge portion on which the saw teeth 12 are cut, as stated above. Each saw tooth 12 has a at top cutting edge 22. Each tooth 12 then tapers downwardly on its sides 40 and 42 to a point more than half way between the top 22 and the gullet 30 of the tooth. As an illustration the taper from the top outside cutting edge on a blade having a width of .50 inch ranges from approximately l to 5 degrees, and is provided to prevent binding of the teeth in the kerf being cut in the work material. The degree of taper from the perpendicular is indicated by the dot-dash lines on the sides of the blade in FIG. 2 (not numbered). At this point, denoted by the ridge 38 (FIG. 2), a second taper is formed in the sides of the blade in substantially greater degree and in a radial or concave taper extending to a point below the bottom or gullet 30 of the teeth 12. At this point the second or concave taper denoted by 44 and 46 blends into the gradual taper denoted by the tapering sides 36 of the saw blade. As an illustration of the degree of taper, in a saw blade having a blade width of .050 inch would be drawn on a radius of .100 inch. As shown the second concave or radial taper 44 and 46 is substantially greater than the first taper 40 and 42, to provide chip clearance. It will be noted in FIG. 2 that the second taper extends below the point 30 or gullet of the teeth 12. In this Way substantially greater strength is provided for the teeth 12, and this permits the gullet 30 in the teeth to be placed low enough to provide adequate chip clearance. It will be understood that the remaining taper of the blade denoted by the sides 36 may be omitted as nonessential. The remaining taper 36 is desirable chiefly to prevent binding of the saw blade in the kerf being cut and to permit the blade to cut in circles in the work material being operated on but it may be noted that the second and concave or radial side tapers 44 and 46, in blending into the taper 36 of the shank 10 provides side arch strength for the shank 10 and teeth 12.

It will be apparent that alternative embodiments and modifications of our invention disclosed herein may be made without departure from our invention as disclosed and claimed herein. Accordingly our disclosure is not to be construed as limited within the full scope of the appended claims.

We claim:

1. A saw blade formed from a blank having a thickened edge portion, edge cutting teeth formed in said thickened edge portion extending transversely thereof, each tooth having a straight top cutting edge extending the full width of said thickened edge, and tapering slightly downwardly on its sides to a point more than half way between the straight top cutting edge and the gullet of the tooth, and then tapering in substantially greater degree in a concave taper from the end of the first taper to a point below the gullet of the tooth.

2. A saw blade formed from a blank having a thickened edge portion, edge cutting teeth formed in said thickened edge portion extending transversely thereof, and being of uniform size and in longitudinal alignment with each other, each tooth having a straight top cutting edge extending the full width of said thickened edge, and tapering slightly downwardly on its sides to a point more than half way between the straight cutting edge and the gullet of the tooth, and then tapering in substantially greater degree in a concave taper from the end of the rst taper to a point below the gullet of the tooth.

3. A saw blade comprising an elongated shaft having a bottom cutting edge and a top edge and spaced side walls having a greater thickness at the bottom than at the top, means at one end for attachment of the shaft to a driving member for reciprocal movement of the shaft longitudi.- nally, longitudinally spaced cutting teeth formed on said bottom cutting edge and extending transversely thereo in uniform width and in longitudinal alignment with each other on said shaft, said teeth having a straight transverse cutting edge every point of which is equidistant from the plane of the top edge and having side walls having a rst taper slightly downwardly from the top cutting edge to a point more than half way between the straight cutting edges and the gullets of the teeth, and having a second and concave taper from the end of the first taper to a point below the gullets of the teeth.

4. A saw blade as in claim 3, in which the second and concave taper merges into the remaining taper of the shaft to the top edge thereof.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,646,094 Russell July 2l, 1953 2,735,458 Buchmann Feb. 2l, 1956 2,890,728 Craven June 16, 1959 FOREIGN PATENTS 201,018 Austria Dec. 10, 1958

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2646094 *Oct 6, 1949Jul 21, 1953Rcs Engineering CorpReciprocating saw blade with piercing means
US2735458 *Apr 28, 1952Feb 21, 1956 Buchmann
US2890728 *Mar 11, 1957Jun 16, 1959Capewell Mfg CompanySaber saw blade
AT201018B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4584999 *Jun 29, 1984Apr 29, 1986Arnegger Richard ESaw blade with shallow section
US5768965 *Aug 27, 1996Jun 23, 1998Ncr CorporationCash drawer assembly with cutter
US6135004 *Jul 14, 1995Oct 24, 2000Gebelius Sven Runo VilhelmSaw blade
US6149510 *Mar 2, 1999Nov 21, 2000Romagnoli; Brian A.Abrading blade
US6283843Jul 31, 2000Sep 4, 2001Brian A. RomagnoliAbrading blade
US6823593 *Feb 18, 2003Nov 30, 2004Michael Dunn-RankinSerrated cutting blade
US7225714Dec 22, 2004Jun 5, 2007Black & Decker Inc.Tooth form design for reciprocating saw blade
US7658136Feb 9, 2010Black & Decker Inc.Hole saw blade
US8596166May 7, 2012Dec 3, 2013Black & Decker Inc.Reciprocating saw blade with plunge nose
US8689667Apr 22, 2011Apr 8, 2014Milwaukee Electric Tool CorporationSaw blade
US8776659Aug 9, 2012Jul 15, 2014Milwaukee Electric Tool CorporationSaw blade
US9364907Dec 3, 2008Jun 14, 2016Black & Decker Inc.Jigsaw blade
US9375796May 7, 2010Jun 28, 2016Irwin Industrial Tool CompanySaw blade with robust tooth form
US20040158995 *Feb 18, 2003Aug 19, 2004Michael Dunn-RankinSerrated cutting blade
US20060130628 *Dec 22, 2004Jun 22, 2006Markus RompelTooth form design for reciprocating saw blade
US20060130629 *Dec 22, 2004Jun 22, 2006Markus RompelHole saw blade
US20090144992 *Dec 3, 2008Jun 11, 2009Black & Decker Inc.Jigsaw Blade
US20090145280 *Oct 30, 2008Jun 11, 2009Black & Decker Inc.Reciprocating Saw Blade with Plunge Nose
US20100175532 *Jul 15, 2010Thomas EvattSaw blade
USD642028Jul 26, 2011Irwin Industrial Tool CompanyReciprocating saw blade
USD693661Jul 25, 2011Nov 19, 2013Irwin Industrial Tool CompanyReciprocating saw blade
USD714602Sep 30, 2013Oct 7, 2014Irwin Industrial Tool CompanyReciprocating saw blade
USD725450 *Nov 13, 2013Mar 31, 2015Irwin Industrial Tool CompanyReciprocating saw blade
USD732914 *Nov 13, 2013Jun 30, 2015Irwin Industrial Tool CompanyReciprocating saw blade
CN103517779A *Feb 17, 2012Jan 15, 2014罗伯特博世有限公司Saw blade
DE3433279A1 *Sep 11, 1984Mar 20, 1986Honsberg Gmbh SonderwerkzeugmaSaegeblatt
WO2012152458A1 *Feb 17, 2012Nov 15, 2012Robert Bosch GmbhSaw blade
Classifications
U.S. Classification83/855, 30/357, 30/355
International ClassificationB23D61/00, B23D61/12
Cooperative ClassificationB23D61/128
European ClassificationB23D61/12S