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Publication numberUS3112079 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 26, 1963
Filing dateMay 18, 1960
Priority dateMay 18, 1960
Publication numberUS 3112079 A, US 3112079A, US-A-3112079, US3112079 A, US3112079A
InventorsNiekamp Richard A, Robinson Harry F
Original AssigneeStandard Dayton Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Waste disposer
US 3112079 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 26, 1963 R. A. NIEKAMP ETAL 7 WASTE DISPOSER 3 Sheets-Sheet l 11 "2 FlG-4 Filed May 18. 1960 FIG-1 62 H L. I 12 64 ..3

50 in. fli 54 I 172 1 170 mmvroks RICHARD A. NIEKAMP a I BY HA RRY F. ROBINS N +4 72 ATTORNEY Nov. 26, 1963 R. A. NIEKAMP ETAL WASTE DI'SPOSER 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 18,1960

.h Y. m P f V mum m I, ll 4 2 N T i"! 1 4 I A I .|II'"'4I' 5 I, A In. I WY 3 53222; AR 5 a mm n RH y 7 w Nov. 26, 1963 R. A. NIEKAMP ETAL 3,112,079

- WASTE DISPOSER Filed May 18. 1960 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 FIG-1O All 102 i106 0L T2 MOTOR 102 v 106 i M T] 18 R 120 CR 122 sow - 142 13 L ;:L|s' 4 MGMQZ I TIME DELAY OPEN R mmvrons RICHARD A. NIEKAMP a HARRY F. noamson AT TOR N EY United States Patent 3,112,079 WASTE DISPOSER Richard A. Niekamp, Dayton, and Harry F. Robinson,

Cincinnati, Ohio, assignors to Standard Dayton Corporation, a corporation of Ohio Filed May 18, 1960, Ser. No. 29,973 Claims. (Cl. 241257) This invention relates to a store fixture. The invention relates more particularly to a store fixture for disposal of waste material such as is encountered in a vegetable and fruit department of a store such as a supermarket or the like. The invention relates more particularly to waste disposer apparatus which includes comminution mechanism. However, the invention is not so limited. The invention is not limited to use in supermarkets or stores in that disposer apparatus made according to this invention may also be used in other cations such as in kitchens or in industries.

An object of this invention is to provide disposer apparatus which may be operated very efiiciently.

Another object of this invention is to provide disposer apparatus of the comminution type which has extremely long life and in which comminution elements are readily adjustable, interchangeable, and replaceable.

Another object of this invention is to provide rotary comminution apparatus and controls therefor in which the comminution apparatus automatically reverses in operation upon each start thereof.

Another object of this invention is to provide such disposer apparatus in which the comminution elements are readily freed from any jamming or clogging which may occur.

Another object of this invention is to provide rotary comminution mechanism which operates extremely efliciently and etfectively.

Another object of this invention is to provide rotary comminution apparatus which can be operated equally efficiently and effectively in either direction of rotation.

Another object of this invention is to provide comminution apparatus which operates upon the principles of velocity, impact, and fragmentation.

Another object of this invention is to provide means by which machine elements may be closely and accurately fit together with a minimum amount of machining operation. Another object of this invention is to provide means by which an element made of very hard material may be prepared to fit with another element without the necessity of cutting or grinding upon the hard material.

Another object of this invention is to provide novel support members which can be readily and easily adjusted.

Another object of this invention is to provide impedance means for a rotary comminution apparatus which impedance means serve to prevent movement of the waste material in a direction away from the comminution apparatus until the material has been processed by the apparatus.

Another object of this invention is to provide such impedance means which operates effectively regardless of the direction of movement of the comminution apparatus.

Another object .of this invention is to provide such impedance which creates a minimum amount of resistance "ice to the comminution process and thus permits maximum efiiciency of operation.

Other objects and advantages reside in the construction of parts, the combination thereof, the method of manufacture, and the mode of operation, as will become more apparent from the following description.

In the drawing:

FIGURE 1 is an overall side elevational view of disposer apparatus of this invention.

FIGURE 2 is a side elevational view with parts broken away and shown in section and drawn on a somewhat larger scale than FIGURE 1, showing disposer apparatus of this invention.

FIGURE 3 is a sectional view taken substantially on line 33 of FIGURE 2.

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view taken substantiall on line 44 of FIGURE 2.

FIGURE 5 is a sectional view taken substantially on line 5-5 of FIGURE 2.

FIGURE 6 is an enlarged fragmentary view showing a portion of disposer apparatus of this invention.

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary view, similar to FIGURE 6, showing elements of FIGURE 6 in an adjusted position.

FIGURE 8 is a fragmentary perspective view showing portions of comminution elements of disposer apparatus of this invention.

FIGURE 9 is a fragmentary sectional view showing a support element made according to this invention.

FIGURE 10 is a schematic wiring diagram showing control circuits for operation of disposer apparatus of this invention.

Referring to the drawings in detail, FIGURE 1 shows generally waste disposer apparatus of this invention. The apparatus comprises a base .16 which has downwardly extending stub legs 18, each of which has a socket therein, as shown in FIGURES 2 and 9.

Slidably fitting within each stub leg 18 is a tube 2%. The tube 20 has a nut 22 fixed therewithin. A stud bolt 24 is secured within each stub leg 18 and threadedly extends through hte nut 22 thereof and within the tube 20.

The lower end of each tube 20 is crimped over a ball type of connector 26 which is attached to a plate or foot 30. The plate or foot 30 is thus self aligning with respect to the tube 26*. Also, the tube 20 is adjustably axially movable with respect to the stub leg 18 by rotation of the tube 20 which threadedly moves the nut 22 upon the stud bolt 24, as shown in FIGURE 9. Thus, the base 16 can be readily adjusted and leveled upon a floor or other surface.

Within the base 16 there is formed a bowl 32 which communicates with a discharge conduit 34.

The base 16 has an inturned flange 36 at the upper edge thereof. Resting upon the flange 36 are a plurality of gaskets 38 which separate the flange 36 from a flange 40 of a sizing ring 42, as shown in FIGURES 2, 6, and 7.

Mounted upon the flange 40 of the sizing ring 42 is a flange 48 of a housing 50 forming a chamber 49 therewithin above the bowl 32. A gasket 51 seals between the flanges 40 and 48. The flanges 36, 40, and 48 and the gaskets 33 and 51 are secured together by bolt members 53.

Directly connected to the housing 50 and extending angularly upwardly therefrom is a chute 54. Mounted upon the chute 54 is a receiver 56 having attached thereupon a platform 60 and a trimmer bracket 62. A fluid conduit 64 provides fluid to the receiver 56 at two portions thereof to urge and to carry downwardly the waste materials which drop into the receiver 56.

The base 16 has a slightly raised portion 70 centrally located in the bowl 32, as shown in FIGURE 2. A shaft 72 of a motor 74 extends through the portion 70. Attached to the upper end of the shaft 72 is a hub 75 of a turntable 76. A key 77 nonrotatably attaches the hub 75 to the shaft 72. A fluid sealing member 79 is carried by the portion 70 and is slidably engaged by the turntable 76.

The turntable 76 has a plurality of recesses in the upper surface thereof. Within each recess is a base 78 which carries impact blocks or lugs 80 which extend above the surface of the turntable 76. Each impact block 80 is shown in FIGURE as having a generally square configuration. However, any other suitable configuration may also be used. Each block 80 has side edges or surfaces 81 which are shown as being substantially vertical but may be at any suitable inclined angle. The side surfaces 81 are disposed so as to be angular with respect to a radial line of the turntable 76 which passes directly below the side surfaces 81. Thus, each of the blocks 80 has vertical fragmentation edges 82 at opposite portions thereof forming the juncture between two adjacent side surfaces 81 of the block 80. The turntable 76 is adapted to rotate either clockwise or counter clockwise, as discussed below. Thus, either of the fragmentation edges 82 of each block 80 may become a leading edge thereof.

It is to be noted in FIGURES 5 and 8 that the blocks 80 upon each base 78 are not symmetrically disposed with respect to the base 78. Each base 78 can be disposed in any one of the recesses of the turntable 76 with either end of the base 78 at the periphery of the turntable 76. Thus, as shown in FIGURE 5, the two diametrically opposite base members 78 are disposed so that the blocks 80 thereof are at the same distances from the center of the turntable 76. Thus, alternate or adjacent base members 73 have the blocks 80 thereof at different distances from the center of the turntable 76. Therefore, during rotation of the turntable, adjacent or alternate base members 78 have the blocks 80 thereof forming different impact circles. Thus, the spaced apart blocks 80 provide substantially complete rotational impact coverage across most of the diameter of the turntable 76. Furthermore, only one type or kind of impact member need be provided and it can be used in any of the plurality of positions on the turntable 76.

Also, due to the fact that each of the impact blocks 80 has a vertical line type of leading or fragmentation edge 82 with diverging side surfaces or walls 81, there is a minimum amount of resistance created as the impact blocks 80 are rotated through liquid and/or waste material. Furthermore, as a result of the shape and positions of the impact blocks 80 it has been found that when the turntable 76 is rotating through a body of water or other liquid which is used as a waste material carrier within the disposer apparatus there is only slight additional load created upon the motor 74 above the load created by the freely rotating turntable 76 with no liquid in contact therewith. Also, as a result of the shape and positions of the impact blocks 80, the amount of energy required to rotate the turntable 76 during the comminution process is low compared to known types of turntables and impact members.

As stated above, the impact blocks 80 are shown as being square or rectangular, as viewed in FIGURE 5. However, the impact blocks 80 may be any suitable shape. Preferably, each impact block 80 has a vertical leading fragmentation edge, such as edges 82, at opposite portions thereof. Thus, each block 80 has a fragmentation edge 82 in either direction of rotation of the turntable 76. Also,

preferably each impact block has diverging side surfaces 81 extending from each edge 82. The angle between the side surfaces 81 does not necessarily have to be degrees but may be a larger or smaller angle. Thus, particles of waste which are engaged by the fragmentation edges 82 of the blocks 80 are severed and divided.

The sizing ring 42, as best shown in FIGURES 5 and 8 encompasses the turntable 76 and has alternate segments 90 and slots 92. The width of the slots 92 and the width of the segments 90 is shown as being substantially the same. Also, the depth of the slots 92 is about the same as the depth of the segments 90.

The turntable 76 with the impact blocks 80 and the sizing ring 42 with the segments 90 and slots 92 are referred to as comminution elements. Waste material enters the waste disposer through the receiver 56 and falls through the chute 54 and into the chamber 49 of the housing 50 and moves downwardly until it engages the turntable 76. The waste material is mixed with and is carried by water or other suitable liquid which enters through the conduits 64. The comminution process occurs as the impact blocks 80 of the rotating turntable 76 strike the waste material and break the waste material into smaller portions. The waste material is thrown by centrifugal force against the segments 90 and against the back wall of the slots 92, causing further breaking action upon the particles of waste material. When the particles of waste material are small enough they fall downwardly within the slots 92 or between the peripheral edge of the turntable 76 and the segments 90. The particles are then carried by the liquid outwardly through the discharge conduit 34.

The surface of the segments 90 and the back wall surface of the slots 92 are slightly inclined, as shown in FIGURES 6, 7, and 8. The periphery of the turntable 76 is closely spaced from the segments 90 of the sizing ring 42 and the peripheral edge of the turntable 76 is slightly inclined to be substantially parallel to the surface of the segments 90 and to the back wall surface of the slots 92.

The upper surface of the turntable 76, the base 7 8 and impact blocks 80 of the impact members, and the sizing ring 42 are made of anti-abrasive materials, such as extremely hard and durable steels and the like. However, there is wearing action of these elements over long periods of time as the comminution process occurs. The peripheral edge of the turntable 76 wears and the surface of the segments '90 is gradually worn as comminution occurs. Due to the fact that the peripheral edge of the turntable 76 and the surface of the segments 90 are slightly inclined, adjustments to compensate for wearing action of these elements can easily be made. As shown in FIGURE 6, there may be three gaskets 38 between the flange 40 of the sizing ring 42 and the flange 36 of the base 16. By removal of one gasket 38, as shown in FIGURE 7, the sizing ring 42 is lowered so that the inclined surface of the segments 90 is brought closer to the peripheral edge surface of the turntable 76. Thus, even though wear has occurred at the peripheral edge surface of the turntable 76 and upon the inclined surface of the segments 90, removal of a gasket 38, as shown in FIGURE 7, compensates for the wear and brings the surfaces of the segments 90 to a desired spaced position with respect to the turntable 76.

It is readily understood that the sizing ring 42 and the turntable 76 must be substantially concentric. As stated above, these elements are made of very hard durable materials. Preferably the sizing ring 42 with its flange 40 is a casting. In order for the sizing ring 42 to be concentric with the turntable 76, opposite portions of the outer surface of the sizing ring 42 must be suitably spaced and must fit properly against the inner edge of the flange 36 of the base 16. The ordinary method for a proper fit to make the sizing ring 42 concentric with the turntable 76 would be that of grinding the outer surface of the sizing ring 42. Due to the fact that the material of the sizing ring 42 is very hard and durable,

the grinding operation upon the outer surface of the sizing ring 42 would be diflicult and expensive. Therefore, in this invention the sizing ring 42 is not ground on the outer surface thereof. Instead, projections or protuberances 98 of ,a softer material are secured to the outer surface of the sizing ring 42 as shown in FIGURES 5, 6, and 7. These projections 98 may be spaced at 90 degree or 120 degree positions or at other positions upon the outer surface of the sizing ring 42. These projections 98 of softer material may be welds or may be bodies attached to the ring 42 by welding or by any other suitable means. These projections 98 make the outer surface of the sizing ring 42 larger than desired. However, the projections 98 are then ground or otherwise cut to remove mate-rial therefrom. Removal of material from the projections 98 is carried out accurately to cause the sizing ring 42 to properly fit against the flange of the base 16 while being concentric with the turntable 76. Thus, the sizing ring 42 is accurately positioned with respect to the turntable 76 with a minimum amount of cutting for forming. Furthermore, the sizing ring 42 is properly located with respect to the turntable 76 with a minimum amount of work upon the hard durable material of which the sizing ring 42 is made.

Turntable Control Mechanism As stated above, the turntable 76 is adapted to rotate in either direction of rotation. Means are automatically provided by which the motor 74 which rotates the turntable 76 through the shaft 72 automatically operates the turntable 76 in the opposite direction each time the motor 74 is started. The mechanism for carrying out this operation is shown as a schematic diagram in FIG- URE Lines L1, L2, and L3 provide electrical energy to the motor 74 and to the control circuitry therefor through a three-pole switch 18-0. Forward contactors 162 and reverse contactors 1114 join the switch 100 to the motor 74. Suitable overload devices 106 are shown connected in the lines leading from the contactors 1112 and 1114 to the motor 74.

Control leads 108 and 110 lead from the switch member 1100 to control mechanism. Shown connected in the lead 108 is a pressure switch 112. This pressure switch 112 is also shown in FIGURE 1 connected to a liquid supply conduit 114 and is closed when a certain minimum liquid pressure is present within the supply conduit 114. The pressure switch 112 is connected to an electric lead 116 as shown in FIGURE 10. The pressure switch 112 is in series with a normally-open contact 118 of a control relay and in series with a normally-closed contact 1219 of a reversing switch. In series with the normally-closed contact 120 is an operating coil 122 of a control relay which includes the normally'open contact .118. The operating coil 122 also connects to the control lead 110. Connected across the normally-open contact 118 is a normally-open contact 124- of a forward switch.

A normally-closed stop button 126 and a normallyopen start button 128 connect from the lead 116 to a timer relay 131). Connected across the start button 125 is a normally-open contact 132 which instantaneously closes when the timer relay 130 is engerized. The contact 132 also instantaneously opens when the timer relay 130* is deenergized.

Also connected to the lead 116 is a normally-open contact 134 of the timer relay 130. The contact 134 instantaneously closes when the timer relay 130 is energized but the contact 134 opens only after a time delay following deenergization of the timer relay 130. Connected between the contact 134 and the lead 110 is an operating coil 138- of a solenoid valve 140* shown in FIGURE 1. The operating 'coil 138 when energized opens the valve 140 so that water or other liquid can flow from the supply conduit 114 to the conduits 64. Overload contacts 142 are connected from the lead I110 to a V 6 lead 144. The contacts 142 are associated with the overload devices 166 so that the contacts 142 open when one or both of the overload devices 106 is subjected to an abnormal temperature.

Connected from the contact 134 to the lead 144 is a normally-open contact 146 which is in series with an operating coil 148 of a forward switch. Connected across the contact 146 is a normally-closed reverse contact 150 and a normally-closed contact 152 of the control relay which is operated by the operating coil 122. Also connected from the contact 134 to the lead 144 is a normally-open reverse contact 154 which is in series with an operating coil 156 of a reversing switch. Connected across the contact 154 is a normally-closed forward contact 158 which is in series with a normally-open control relay contact 160.

Thus, it is understood that the control relay contacts 160, 152, and 1118 operate with energization of the operating coil 1212. Furthermore, it is understood that the forward contacts 158, 146, 124 and the forward contactors 102 operate with energization of the forward operating coil 148. Also, the reverse contacts 154, 150, 120, and the reverse contactors 10 4 operate with energization of the reverse operating coil 156.

Operation of the control mechanism for operation of the motor 74 is as follows: As previously stated, the pressure switch 112 is closed when the liquid pressure within the conduit 114 is of a certain minimum value. When the start button 128 is momentarily closed, the timer relay 1311 is energized so that the contacts 132 and 134 instantaneously close. When the contact 132 closes, the start button 128 may be released and the contact 132 maintains the circuit from the lead 116 through the timer relay 1311 to the lead Also, due to the fact that the contact 1 34 is closed, the operating coil 138 of the valve 1411 is energized, permitting flow of liquid from the supply conduit 114 to the conduit 64. Also due to the fact that the contact 134 is closed, a circuit exists through the normally-closed reverse contact 159 and the normally-closed control relay contact 152 and through the operating coil 148 of the forward switch to the lead 144.

Thus, the operating coil 148 is energized and the contactor 102 closes, energizing the motor 74 for operation in the forward direction. Also, when the operating coil 148 is energized, the contact 158 opens; the contact 146 closes and the contact 124 closes. When the contact 124 closes, the operating coil 122 of the control relay is energized causing the contact 160 to close and the contact 152 to open. Also, when the operating coil 122 is energized, the contact 118 is closed.

The motor74 thus operates in the forward direction, causing rotation of the turntable 76 in a given direction until the stop button 126 is opened, causing deenergization of the timer relay 130. When the timer relay is deenergized, the contact 132 instantaneously opens. However, the contact 134 remains closed for a time delay period before opening. During the time delay period, while the contact 134 is closed, the operating coil 138 of the solenoid valve is energized so that water continues to flow from the conduits 64 and into the receiver 56. Thus, waste material which remains after the turntable 76 is stopped may be flushed out of the bowl 32 and outwardly through the discharge conduit 34. After the time delay period elapses the contact 134 opens, deenergizing the operating coil 138 of the solenoid valve 140 so that the flow of liquid from the conduit 114 to the conduit 64 is stopped. Simultaneously the operating coil 148 is deenergized so that the forward contactors 102 open, thus disconnecting the motor from the line.

When it is desired to again operate the motor 74 for rotation of the turntable 76, the start button 128 is again depressed, energizing the timer relay 130 andclosing the contacts 132 and 134 of the timer relay 130. However, it should be noted that after the first energization of the operating coil 122 and as long as the pressure switch 112 remains closed, the operating coil 122 remains energized. This is due to the fact that the contact 118 of the control relay closed immediately following energization of the forward operating coil 148, causing closing of the contact 124.

Thus, when the start button 128 is pushed for the second starting of the motor 74, the contact 152 is open; the contact 118 is closed and the contact 160 is closed. Therefore, the circuit through the contact 134 of the timer relay 130 to the lead 144 is established through the contact 158 of the forward switch, through the contact 160 of the control relay and through the operating coil 156 of the reverse switch. Thus, the contactors 104 of the reverse switch close, causing rotation of the motor 74 in the reverse direction. Thus, the turntable 76 rotates in the reverse direction.

Thus, it is understood that as long as the pressure switch 112 remains closed, upon each start of the motor 74 by depression of the start button 128, the motor 74 operates in the opposite direction. This automatic reversal of the rotation of the turntable 76 is particularly advantageous due to the fact that any possibility of clogging of the comminution elements is greatly reduced. If waste material should be in a clogging position between the turntable 76 and the sizing ring 42 when the turntable 76 is stopped, the material is usually removed from such a clogging position upon starting of the turntable 76 in the opposite direction. Only upon rare occasions does reversal of rotation fail to unclog the comminution elements. As is shown in FIGURES 2 and 4 the lower end of the shaft 72 of the motor 74 has a square or rectangular section so that a wrench or other tool of any suitable type may be placed upon the lower end of the shaft 72 for unclogging of the comminution apparatus by manual rotation of the shaft 72 and the turntable 76.

Deflector Vanes In the operation of the disposer apparatus of this invention large amounts of Waste material are placed into the receiver 56 and move downwardly through the chute 54 and through the chamber 49 of the housing 50 and rest upon the turntable 76. Quantities of waste material may exist above the turntable 76 and extend into the chamber 49 of the housing 50. During rotation of the turntable 76, material within the chamber 49 of the housing 50 may be thrown or urged upwardly by centrifugal forces or other forces resulting from comminution action. However, such material which is urged upwardly is impeded in its movement by means of deflector vanes 170, shown in FIGURE 2. Preferably the deflector vanes 170 are disposed in diverging pairs, as shown in FIGURE 2, and there may be a plurality of pairs of deflector vanes 170.

Each deflector vane 170 has an upper surface 172 which is sloped or gradually inclined so that material falling downwardly from the chute 54 into the chamber 49 of the housing 50 is not impeded. The lower surface 1740f each deflector vane 170 aids in restricting movement of waste material upwardly within the chamber 49 of the housing 50. The lower surface 174 of each of the deflector vanes 170 is preferably inclined as shown in FIGURES 2 and 3, so that all of the lower surface 174 is substantially normal to a vertical plane passing through the surface 174. Due to the fact that there are oppositely disposed upwardly diverging deflector vanes, each of which is at the same angle with respect to the turntable 76, the deflector vanes 170 serve to restrict upward movement of material regardless of the direction of rotation of the turntable 76.

Although the preferred embodiment of the device has been described, it will be understood that within the purview of this invention various changes may be made in the form, details, proportion and arrangement of parts, the combination thereof and mode of operation, which generally stated consist in a device capable of carrying out the objects set forth, as disclosed and defined in the appended claims.

Having thus described our invention, we claim:

1. In waste disposer apparatus:

a turntable rotatable about a substantially vertical axis and having an upper surface provided with a plurality of depressions which extend below the upper surface,

a plurality of impact members, each of the impact members having a base portion disposed in one of said depressions so that the base portion has an upper surface which is substantially coplanar with the upper surface of the turntable,

each impact member including a plurality of spacedapart blocks extending upwardly from the upper surface of the base portion,

the base portion being larger than any one of the blocks,

there being a block at a given distance from the axis of rotation of the turntable and a block at a different distance from the axis of rotation of the turntable.

2. In waste disposer apparatus:

a substantially circular turntable rotatable about a substantially vertical axis, the turntable having an upper surface provided with a plurality of recesses therein which are below said upper surface,

a plurality of impact members, there being one impact member for each of the recesses, each of the impact members including a base disposed within one of the recesses, each base being within its respective recess and having an upper surface which is substantially coplanar with the upper surface of the turntable,

each of the impact members also including a plurality of spaced-apart impact blocks which extend above said upper surface of the base and above said upper surface of the turntable,

each of the impact blocks having a plurality of side wall surfaces which are substantially normal to said upper surface of the turntable, each of said side wall surfaces of each block being angularly inclined with respect to a radius of the turntable passing through the base upon which the block is disposed.

3. A waste disposer comprising a sizing ring having an axially inclined inner surface, the sizing ring also having a plurality of slots, each of the slots having an axially inclined inner wall, a turntable rotatable within the sizing ring and concentric therewith, the turntable having a peripheral edge which is axially inclined and substantially parallel with the axially inclined inner surface of the sizing ring, and means for adjusting the axial position of the sizing ring with respect to the turntable to compensate for wear of the turntable and sizing ring.

4. In waste disposer apparatus,

a turntable rotatable about a substantially vertical axis and having an upper surface provided with a plurality of radially extending depressions which are below the upper surface,

a plurality of impact members, each of the impact members having a base portion disposed in one of said depressions which are below the upper surface of the turntable, the base portion having an upper surface which is substantially coplanar with the upper surface of the turntable, each impact member including an impact block extending upwardly from the upper surface of the turntable,

the impact block being provided with a fragmentation edge.

5. A waste disposer comprising a sizing ring having an axially inclined inner surface, a turntable rotatable within the sizing ring and concentric therewith, the turntable having a peripheral edge which is axially inclined and substantially parallel with the axially inclined inner surface of the sizing ring, and means for adjusting the axial position of the sizing ring with respect to the turntable to compensate for wear of the turntable and sizing ring.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Shellabarger Aug. 14, 1900 Williams Aug. 24, 1900 Bendix Sept. 17, 1929 130113011 Aug. 16, 1932 Battey Apr. 25, 1939 10 10 Anderson July 28, 1942 Hamrnes Ian. 26, 1954 Simmons May 18, 1954 Sutton Apr. 17, 1956 Johnson Sept. 18, 1956 Gordon Mar. 12, 1957 Strehlow et a1. May 27, 1958 Holzer Sept. 16, 1958 Jordan Nov. 10, 1959 Roe May 18, 1960

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification241/257.1, 241/46.16, 241/46.17, 241/36, 241/260, 241/46.13, 241/298
International ClassificationE03C1/26, E03C1/266
Cooperative ClassificationE03C1/2665, B02C18/0092
European ClassificationB02C18/00W2, E03C1/266B