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Publication numberUS311278 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 27, 1885
Publication numberUS 311278 A, US 311278A, US-A-311278, US311278 A, US311278A
InventorsWilliam Williams
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Indicator for base-ball or cricket fields
US 311278 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

2 Sheets-Sheet 1.

(No Model) W. WILLIAMS.

INDICATOR FOR BASE BALL OR CRICKET FIELDS.

No. 311,278. Patented Jan. 27', 1885.

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(No Model.) 2 Sheets-Sheet 2.

W. WILLIAMS.

INDICATOR FOR BASE BALL 0R GRIGKET FIELDS. No. 311,278. Patented Jan. 27, 1885.

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UNITED STATES PATENT UEEICE.

VILLIAM \VILLIAMS, OF HUNTINGDON, PENNSYLVANIA.

INDICATOR FOR BAS' SFECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 311,278, dated January 27,1885.

(No model.)

To all whom, it may concern:

Be it known that I. \VILLIAM WiLLLiMs, a citizen of the United States, residing at Huntingdon, in the county of Huntingdon and State of Pennsylvania, have invented a new and useful Indicator for BaseB-all or Cricket Fields, of which the following is a specification, reference being had to the accompanying draw ings.

This invention relates to indicators for base ball or cricket fields, or that class of devices which are used to signal the umpire when the runner steps on the bases; and it has for its object to' provide an automatically-operatingattachment for the bases, said attachment connecting with an electric bell, so that when the runner steps on or passes over the base the bell will sound, so as to prevent all disputes.

\Vith this object in view the said invention consists in certain details of construction and combination of parts, as hereinafter set forth, and particularly pointed out in the claims.

In the accompanying drawings, Figure l is a plan view of my improved indicatii'ig apparatus in position on a base-ball field. Fig. 2 is a detail view of the actuating mechanism. Fig. 3 is a sectional view of the same.

Like letters of reference are used to indicate corresponding parts in the several figures.

Referring to the drawings, A designates abox or casing arranged in the ground below the base, said box containing the mechanism for closing the circuit and thereby sounding the alarm. At the bottom of the box is secured a board, B, upon which the mechanism is supported, and a series of plates, (three in number,) O D E, are arranged above the board at various distances apart, and connected together and to the said board by posts F F, the plate 0 being constructed of some suitable insulating material.

G designates a metallic disk formed in two pieces or sections, and to which the base H is attached, one section, I, being immovably attached to the upper end of a rod, J, extending upward from the bottom plate, 0, and the other section, I, being secured to the upper end of a rod, K, which passes through plates E D, and extends nearly to the bottom plate, .0. A coiled spring, L, is arranged on the rod K, its lower end abutting against the plate D and its upper end bearing against a nut, M, which may be screwed farther down on the rod, in order to adjust the tension of the sprin A nut, N, is secured on the lower end of the rod K below the plate D, for the purpose of retaining the section I in a slightly-elevated position above the stationary section I.

I designates a contact-post secured to the bottom plate, 0, the rod K, when pressed downward by the runner stepping on the base, coming in contact with the post P, and, in con nection with the wires of the electric circuit, acting to sound the electric bell, as will be presentlydescribed. \ViresRconnectthecontact-post P and rod K with posts S S, projecting upward from the board B, and wires T T are attached to the said posts S at one end, and at their other ends to the posts U U of the electric-bell mechanism, which comprises the usual magnets, V V, hammer \V, and bell Y. A battery, Z, and a switch, A are arranged at any suitable point of the length of wire T, for the purpose well known. The electric bell and its attendant mechanism are constructed in the usual manner, and the bell is preferably arranged on a stand near the umpire, so that he may readily hear the bell when it'rings. The wires should be arranged in pipes in the ground, so as to be out of the way.

The operation ofiny invention will be readily understood from the foregoing description, taken in connection with the annexed drawings. The movable section 1 projects aslight distance above the stationary section I, the base-bag being secured to the top of the sections, so that when the runner steps on or passes over the base the movable section I will be depressed, causing the rod K to move downward, the lower end of the rod coming in contact with the contact-post P, and by means of the electric circuit shown causing the ringing of the bell on the stand near the umpire. As soon as the runner steps off the base the spring L will exert its power and return the movable section I to its normal position. By this means it will be seen that I am enabled to provide an automatically-operating attachment to all of the bases of a base-ball field, so that when the runner steps on the base the electric bell will ring and indicate to the umpire, andthus there will be no disputes, as is usually the ease. The devices employed to attain this end are simple and efficient in their action, and are not liable to get out of order, and will prove of great utility in the use for which they are intended.

It will be obvious that various modifications may be made in the construction without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention. All the lower stops of the circuit-closing bases are connected by a continuous circuit, as shown in Fig. 1 the dotted lines from the second and third base to the bell mechanism indicating the return wires connecting the bases with the bell.

Having described my invention, I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States 1. In an indicator, the combination, with the base, electrical circuits, and an alarm, of intermediate connecting devices, substantially as described, whereby when the runner steps on the base the alarm is sounded, as and for the purpose set forth.

2. In an indicator, the combination, with the electric bell, the electric circuit, and contact-post, of a vertically-moving rod to which the base is attached, said devices operating in the manner described, so that when the run ner steps on the base the rod will be depressed to come in contact with the contactpost and close the circuit, thus ringing the bell, as set forth.

3. In an indicator, the combination, with the bell, the electric circuit, and contact-post, of a vertically-moving spring-presselil bar or rod and a sectional disk, one section of said disk being stationary and the other section being fitted to the upper end of the rod, and the base attached to the disk, arranged and operating in the manner described, for the purpose set forth.

4. In an indicator, the combination, with the electric bell, electric circuit, and contactpost, of aseries of plates arranged above each other at different distances apart and held together in any suitable manner, a rod project ing upward from the bottom plate, a movable rod having a spring coiled thereon and passing through the two upper plates, a disk formed in two sections, and to which the base is at tached, one section of said disk being secured to the stationary rod, and the other section being fitted to the movable rod, arranged and operating for the purpose set forth.

5. In an indicator, the combination, with the bell, the electric circuit, and contact-post, of a vertically-moving rod, a stationary rod, and a sectional disk, one section of said disk being attached-to the upper end of the stationary rod, and the other section being fitted to the upper end of the moving rod, the base fitted to the disk, and means for limiting the downward movement of the moving rod, and also to hold said movable section at a slight distance above the stationary section, as and for the purpose set forth.

6. In an indicator, the combination, with the bell, electric circuit, and contactpost, of aboard arranged in the bottom of a box or casing, a series of plates secured above the board at different distances apart, a stationary rod projecting up from the bottom plate, a vertically-moving rod passing through the plates, a spring coiled on said rod, and provided with means for adjusting the tension of said spring, a sectional disk to which the base is attached, one section being secured to the stationary rod, and the other section being fitted to the moving rod, for the purposes set forth.

I11 testimony that I claim the foregoing as my own I have hereto affixed my signature in presence of two witnesses.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS.

\V i tn esses HENRY GLAZIER, J NO. H. GLAZIER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5401016 *May 18, 1993Mar 28, 1995Heglund; Kenneth W.Automatic baseball ball and strike indicator
US6179734 *Jul 14, 1999Jan 30, 2001Bryan J. BravardBall game method of play and base
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA63B71/0605