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Publication numberUS3112929 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 3, 1963
Filing dateJun 17, 1960
Priority dateJun 17, 1960
Publication numberUS 3112929 A, US 3112929A, US-A-3112929, US3112929 A, US3112929A
InventorsGisser George H
Original AssigneeGisser George H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carousel toy
US 3112929 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

G. H. GISSER CAROUSEL TOY Dec. 3, 1963 3 Sheets-Sheet l Filed June 17. 1960 ATTORNEY Dec. 3, 1.963 G. H. GlssER 3,112,929

cARoUsEL 'roy 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 17, 1960 u, INVENTOR sorge h'. G/sser N.' BY.

lk ATTORNEY Dec. 3, 1963 G. H. GlssER 3,112,929

cARoUsEL. 'roy Filed June 1'7, 1960 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 l y INVENTOR George H G/sser vBY ATTORNEY United States luiatent 3,112,929 Y CARUSEL TY George H. Gisser, Cambria Heights, N.Y. (7 Wilshire Drive, Spring Valley, NX.) 'Filed .lune i7, w60, der. No. 36,901 6 Claims. (Cl. 273-4.)

The instant invention relates to roundabout devices and more particularly to a toy carousel or toy merry-goround, the primary plupose of which is to provide amusement for children.

The general object of the present invention is to provide a toy carousel which can be remotely and individually operated by a plurality of children, thereby simulating the functions and excitement of the full-size carousel often considered the focal point of Carnivals and amusement parks.

A more speciiic object of this invention is to provide an improved toy comprising a motor driven carousel, a plurality of rider carrying horses, a turntable supporting each horse and the rider thereof, and controls remote from each horse and rider adapted to motivate, either directly or indirectly, an arm of each rider with respect to a brass-ring feeding device.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an electromechanical or mechanical toy carousel embodying cooperative movable parts arranged to require the eX- ercise of independent skill on the part of each of the carousel operators.

A further object of the invention is to provide a game for children whereby the degree of skill required by the game participants may be predeterminatively varied.

lt is a still further object of the present invention t provide a miniature carousel suiciently interesting in function as to be capable of capturing the attention 0f adults as well as children for extended periods of time.

These and further objects will become more readily apparent during a reading of the speciication when examined in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FlGURE l is a sectional side elevation of the structure embodying the instant invention; and

FGURF. 2 is a schematic plan view of the toy carousel, emphasis being given to preferred circuitry adapted to remotely control horse and/ or rider movement; and

FIGURE 3 is an expanded View of the brass-ring dispensing means; and

FlGURE 4 is an alternate embodiment, movement of rider and/ or horse being eifectuated by mechanical means.

Referring to the drawings and particularly to FIGURE l thereof, the toy carousel generally designated as Il is comprised of a base member 2, a rotatable platform 5, a central rotatable support column 6 and a roof 8 providing a fanciful and aesthetic covering for the device.

Not unlike the full-size amusement parl; carousel, the device herewith concerned provides its users with the excitement of vicariously reaching for a brass-ring and with the satisfaction engendered by proper accuracy and timing in achieving their objective. Inasmuch as each participant is able to control the movement of his or her preselected horse and rider with respect to the brass ring, the challenge of independent responsibility and competition is fostered.

Operatively supported in a well-bearing 12 in the base 2 is said shaft or support column e, which extends upwardiy through the housing ll but which at its lower end carries a beveled gear wheel 14. Vertical support column 6 is the driving shaft of the toy carousel. The beveled gear wheel ld meshes with a smaller bevel pinion le carried by a shaft 17 of motor 18. The motor, connected to battery 2li contained in housing ll, is adapted in this aliases ICC manner to drive support column 6 and thus rotate platform 5, xedly secured thereto. lt is to be understood that a power source external of the device may be employed; i.e., house current, if such becomes desirable.

A plurality of horse and rider statuettes spacedly positioned upon platform 5 rotate therewith, arms 5d and 53 of the riders illustrated in FEGURE l passing within the vicinity of the brass-ring holding device 80 during each revolution of the said rotating platform. inasmuch as the position of each riders arm may be remotely and Continually adjusted with respect to the position of brassrings 72, 73, etc., held within device titl, the primary object of the toy, i.e., reaching for and taking a brass-ring, may be accomplished.

To that end solenoid control-support members 33 and 4d adapted to regulate the positions of riders 52 and 54 are soclreted within platform 5 depending upwardly therefrom.V Riders 52 and 54 are illustrated as representative of the many types of electro-mechanical movements contemplated within the scope of this invention. Selected for purposes of illustration, however, is the embodiment of rider 52 wherein the arm Se remains stationary with respect to the rider but where horse de is arranged for vertical movement. For the purpose of further elaboration is shown the embodiment of rider 5d wherein horse 59 does not move vertically but where arm 5S is arranged for movement in a vertical plane.

ln order to impart vertical movement to horse and/ or rider or to an arm of said rider, slidable solenoid core linkages are utilized. With reference to FIGURES l and 2 of the drawings, magnetic cores i2 and di, are disclosed as being slidably received within coil windings .5 of the respective solenoid members. Vertical motion of said magnetic cores is occasioned by establishing a magnetic eld about said magnetic cores, the degree of movement thereof being a function of the intensity of the magnetic field created. Hence, electrically energized solenoid coil windings 45 will attract magnetic cores #i2 and id to positions central of their respective magnetic fields. lnasmuch as springs 46 tend to bias said magnetic cores away from the center of the magnetic eld, predetermined variation of the strength of the held will overcome the constant bias of springs 46 in predictable degrees, thereby enabling control of horse and/ or rider 0r an arm of said rider as may be desired. Rheostats 36 and 33 are observable in FIGURE l as individual control boxes, knobs itl and i2 being capable of electrical resistance regulation, thereby varying the strengths of magnetic fields within said solenoids 4.5.

Reference to FIGURE 2 of the drawings schematically illustrates rheostats S6 and 8S and their respective circuit relationships to solenoids 45. Further reference to FGURE 2 discloses that single power source Ztl furnishes energy both to motor 13 and to solenoids t5 via parallel circuitry. Common central rail 3@ receives a negative electrical charge through sliding contact with brush 36, switch 2l being provided to open and close the circuit created thereby. Switch l5 is further provided to start and stop rotation of circular platform 5.

Unlike common central rail 30 which is integral with and rotatable with platform 5, singular statuette rails 22, 24, 26 and 2S are integral with the base 2, thereby remaining stationary while platform 5 is in motion. Thus, it is seen that central rails 3i?, as heretofore mentioned, is negatively charged through brush 36. It is further seen that said singular rails 22, 24, 2d and 2S positively charged through xed contacts, eg., 2.3 and 25, receive charges varying in magnitude according to the setting of respective rheostats 36 and 83. The circuits are completed, brushes 32, 34, 35, and 37, and fixed contacts 23, 25', 27 and 29 closing the circuit through solenoids 45.

As an embodiment ancillary to the preferred embodiment previously disclosed, FIGURE 4 relates to a device of the character described wherein movement of the statuette is accomplished by solely mechanical means. With reference to said figure, rotatable platform 102 Supports stanchion fr?, the support member for horse 110 and the rider thereon. Arm HZ is adapted for motion in a vertical plane about pin H3, such movement being urged in a clockwise direction by virtue of spring and lcver arrangement M4 and lllti. Cord f2@ attached to arm lf2 is supported from above by pulley 12E and guided thereby toward and around pulley 126. Cord 126 is thereafter guided axially through vertical support column 27, said support column being journalled for rotation between bearings lf3/ and T136. The device illustrated in FIGURE 4 may be entirely bereft of electrical influence, rotation of support column and platform being occasioned by a spring wound motor adapted to drive beveled gears 128 and i3d. Control cord 1.2i) emerges concentrically from the lower end of support column E27 through flared bearing passage E32 to without base ft? to control-device fltl. Movement of lever le?. about pivot point i44- transmits said movement to arm 112 thereby permitting control thereover. Twisting and subsequent binding of cord 12) is obviated by employment of swivel 122 position-ed as shown, within support column E27. According to the latter embodiment, therefore, motion of arm ft2 of the statuette illustrated can be most economically and simply effectuated. Movement of said arm can thusly be regulated through preselective movement of lever 142 as heretofore described, said movement corresponding in effect to the movement occasioned in the preferred electrical embodiment according to FIGURES l and 2 of the accompanying drawings.

Brass-ring holding device Sd illustrated in detail in FIGURE 3 of the drawings is shown in FIGURE 1 tixedly secured to supporting strut 7d, the bass-ring dispensing end 74 of said device being cantilevered above rotating platform S and in the general vicinity of the statuettes passing nearby in the course of rotation of said platform 5. Pivotally mounted upon pin 76, brass-ring holding tube '7l is adapted to successively gravity-feed brass-rings toward lip retaining means 74 upon removal of the protruding ring, e.g., brass-ring '73 as shown in FIGURE 3. That is, should brass-ring 73 be taken by hand '75 of rider S2, brass-ring 72 will automatically roll through channel guide means 69 downwardly toward lip 74 and be held in position thereby in order that another rider may be controlled to attempt similar removal of ring 72. Removal of said rings is readily accomplished by lateral movement thereof through the openings provided in Side walls 79 at the region adjacent the lip retaining means '74, as illustrated in FIGURE 1 of the drawings. The procedure will be repeated until the supply of brass-rings iS depleted. Ballast weights '7S are positioned within brassring holding device 8b to counter-balance the combined weight of the brass-rings retained within guide channel 69. Pivotally balanced about pin 76, the brass-ring holding device will tend to move upwardly in increments at the ring holding side upon removal of the rings fed successively toward lip 74. Accordingly, the inclusion of the balanced ring feed mechanism in the carousel toy becomes desirable on occasions where an increase in the level of the game skill is sought. Hence, the degree of diiliculty in achieving success may be predeterminatively varied through utilization or not of the balanced brassring holding device hereinabove described. Elimination of this feature from the toy may be accomplished by simply increasing weight 78 beyond the combined weight of the brass-rings held within the dispensing side of the device.

Having hereby illustrated certain details of construction which are particularly effective, it is to be understood that various changes may be made Without departing from the spirit of the invention.

Consonant with the foregoing, what is claimed is:

1. A carousel toy comprised of a base member, a rotatable platform on said base member, means for rotating said platform, a central support column journalled for rotation with said rotatable platform, a roof, a plurality of statuettes spacedly positioned with respect to one another, said statuettes being supported by said rotatable platform and extending upwardly therefrom, brass-ring dispensing means supported by said base member and positioned adjacent to said rotatable platform, individual electrical remote control means to continually adjust the vertical position of respective statuettes with respect t0 said brass-ring dispensing means during rotation of said platform, said statuettes being movable into juxtaposition with respect to said ring dispensing means upon rotation of said rotatable platform and ring engaging means on each statuette.

2. A carousel toy according to claim l wherein said brass-ring dispensing means is comprised of an arm disposed in pivotal relationship with a support member extending upwardly from said base member, said arm bcing sloped downwardly with respect to said rotatable platform, a guide-channel disposed within said arm and said guide-channel being adapted to receive a plurality of brass-rings positioned therein in end to end relationship.

3. A carousel toy according to claim 2 wherein said arm of said brass-ring dispensing means is balanced about a pivot point and adapted to decrease in downward slope upon removal of a brass-ring disposed within said guidechannel.

4. A carousel toy comprised of a base member, a rotatable platform, means for rotating said platform on Said base member, a central support column journalled for rotation with said rotatable platform, a roof, a plurality of statuettes spacedly positioned with respect to one another, said statuettes extending upwardly from said 1'0- tatable platform, solenoid power members adapted to move at least a portion of said statuettes, said members being disposed between each of said statuettes and said rotatable platform, control rheostats remotely positioned with respect to said solenoid power members, ring dispensing means pivotally supported adjacent said rotatable platform, said statuettes being movable into juxtaposition with respect to said ring dispensing means upon rotation of said rotatable platform and ring engaging means on each statuette.

5. A carousel toy comprised of a base member, a rotatable platform, means for rotating said platform on said base member, a central support column journalled for rotation with said rotatable platform, a roof, a plurality of statuettes spacedly positioned with respect to one another, said statuettes extending upwardly from said rotatable platform, solenoid power members adapted to move at least a portion of said statuettes, said members being disposed between each of said statuettes and said rotatable platform, said members being in slidable brush contact with respective rails positioned beneath said rotatable platform, control rheostats remotely positioned with respect to said solenoid power members and in brush contact with said respective rails, ring dispensing means pivotally supported adjacent said rotatable platform, said statuettes being movable into juxtaposition with respect to said ring dispensing means upon rotation of said rotatable platform and ring engaging means on each statuette.

6. A carousel toy comprised of a base member, a rotatable platform, means for rotating said platform on said base member, a central support column journalled for rotation with said rotatable platform, a roof, a plurality of statuettes spacedly positioned with respect to one another, said statuettes extending upwardy from said rotatable platform, individual electrical control means to remotely and variably effectuate vertical movement of respcctive statuettes, a ring dispensing member pivotally supported adjacent said rotatable platform, said member being sloped in the direction of said statuettes, one end of said member having ballast Weight therein, said statuettes being movable into juxtaposition with respect to said ring dispensing member upon rotation of said rotatable platform said rings being successively removable from the other end of said member upon contact of said statuettes and said rings, removal of said rings from said member effecting a change in the slope of said member and ring engaging means on each statuette.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Dorsey July 28,

Habeshan July 9,

Handy July 10,

Pearson Apr. 19,

FOREIGN PATENTS Great Britain Sept. 13,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US734681 *Aug 13, 1902Jul 28, 1903Charles J DorseyRoundabout toy.
US1271892 *Apr 30, 1917Jul 9, 1918Anthony O HabeshanKnockdown merry-go-round.
US1966031 *May 28, 1932Jul 10, 1934Levin G HandyOrnamental device for use in association with toy electric railways
US2932918 *Apr 5, 1957Apr 19, 1960Marvin I GlassDancing toy
GB296835A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3387846 *Feb 28, 1966Jun 11, 1968Marvin Glass & AssociatesWheeled toy and target rings
US4198046 *Feb 1, 1978Apr 15, 1980Lohr Raymond JTarget game with moving indicator
US4266767 *Jul 30, 1979May 12, 1981Tomy Kogyo Co., Inc.Competitive capture game
US4767117 *Aug 19, 1986Aug 30, 1988Maio Anthony MAmusement ride and game
US4802668 *Dec 7, 1987Feb 7, 1989Asahi CorporationToy game apparatus
US4890828 *Mar 27, 1989Jan 2, 1990Jack HouOrnamental display assembly
US5203743 *Jul 21, 1992Apr 20, 1993Giftec, Ltd.Ornamental carousel assembly
US6866594 *Jun 29, 2001Mar 15, 2005William Ronald GreenwoodPolo training apparatus
US7334913 *Mar 23, 2007Feb 26, 2008Chen Chin-NanDisplay ornament
WO2002028493A1 *Oct 5, 2001Apr 11, 2002Edelson Noel MTurn-based strategy game
WO2014130459A1 *Feb 18, 2014Aug 28, 2014Dreamlight Holdings Inc., Formerly Known As A Thousand Miles LlcRotating performance stage
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/441, 273/448, 472/12
International ClassificationA63H13/20, A63H13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H13/20
European ClassificationA63H13/20