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Publication numberUS3113690 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 10, 1963
Filing dateMay 26, 1961
Priority dateMay 26, 1961
Publication numberUS 3113690 A, US 3113690A, US-A-3113690, US3113690 A, US3113690A
InventorsSwenck George F
Original AssigneeReynolds Metals Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sectional container having nestable sections
US 3113690 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 10, 1963 Filed May 26, 1961 G. F. SWENCK 3,113,690

SECTIONAL CONTAINER HAVING NESTABLE SECTIONS 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 1 I [52 132 I22 fisz I48 INVENTOR GEORGE F. SWENCK ATTORNEYS Dec; 10, 1.963

e Sheets-She et s mvmon scones F. swsucx ATTORNEYS e. F.. SWENCK 3,113,696 SECTIONAL CONTAINER HAVING NES'I'ABLE smcwxous Filed May 261, 1961 Dec. 10, 1963 G. F. SWENCK SECTIONAL CONTAINER HAVING NESTABLE SECTIONS Filed May 26, 1961 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 IIO INVENTOR GEORGE F. SWENCK BY WLZMWW ATTORNEYS Dec. :10, 1963 a. F. SWENCK 3,

SECTIONAL CONTAINER HAVING JNESTABIJE SECTIONS Filed May .26, .1961 '6 Sheets-Sheet '5 M ZF- J I04 40 F1625) aa f I I 94 52% mg 94 I 'INVENTOR GEORGE 'F. SWE N C K BY 1% SM ATTORNEYS Dec. '10, 1963 G. F. :swENcK SECTIONAL CONTAINERHAVING 'NESTABLE SECTIONS .Fil'ed May '26. 1961 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 GEORGE F. 'SWENCK MWMMW ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,113,690 SECTIUNAL CQNTAHNER HAVING NESTABLE SEiZTitPNS George F. weneir, Henrico County, Va, assignor to Reynoids Metals Company, Richmond, Va, a corporation of Delaware Filed May 26, 1961, Ser. No. 112,834 12 Claims. (Cl. 220-15) This invention relates to containers especially adapted for the shipment of flowabie bulk materials, e.g., finely divide-d solids, liquids, and solids or semi-solids which can be liquidized by heating. Although containers embodying this invention find their primary usage in the shipment of such bulk materials, it Will be realized that they can be used for the shipment of other products.

More particularly, this invention relates to containers constructed in two sections which can be detached from each other and nested for shipment when the container is empty, thus efiecting obvious transportation economies. Contm'ners of this type usually are constructed with an upper section and a lower section each having a closed end or base from which side walls diverge toward an open mouth that is somewhat larger than the base. The upper and lower sections of the container are adapted to be assembled with their open months in opposition and secured together about their rims in a manner to provide a tight joint or peripheral seam substantially midway of the height of the assembled container. When the container is used for the shipment of bulk material, the upper section usually is provided with a filling opening and the lower section with a drain or outlet opening, both openings having removable closures.

While containers of the foregoing type are known, present designs are not completely satisfactory. For example, the various fastening means presently employed for securing the two sections of the container together, when in their assembled relation, are not easily operable and are readily subject to damage by the handling of the containers which is necessary incident to their use. In this connection, containers of the type under consideration will be handled, assembled and disassembled mostly by unskilled labor. Consequently, the construction of the containers, and their fastening means, must be such as to not only simplify the assembly, securing together, and disassembly of the two container sections, but also minimize damage to the container and its fastening means in the handling of such containers.

Containers of the type under consideration frequently are used for the shipment of solids or semi-solids, such as asphalt, which leave a residue in the container sections after the container has been emptied of such contents. Hence, it is most desirable for such containers to have their sections nestable with appreciable clearance between all of their confronting surfaces in order to permit the nested sections to be readily disassembled without sticking. Known containers do not flways meet such a requirement. Moreover, the construction of existing containers of this type is not always such to permit nesting of the sections of several containers in a haphazard order, obviously a most desirable feature when using unskilled labor.

Containers of the type under consideration not only will be lifted out of and lowered into the ships holds, but also must sometimes be tied down to prevent movement during shipment. Hence, such containers should be constructed so as to be readily engageable by lifting or tiedown elements. Present container constructions, however, either preclude ready engagement by simple lifting or tie-down elements, or else are provided with protruding eyes, clevises, or the like, which not only are readily damaged but usually interfere with adjacent con- 3,1135% Patented Dec. 10, 1963 2 tainers to thus diminish shipping-space-utilization of a plurality of such containers.

Containers of the type under consideration should also be constructed so as to be readily stacked, for the most efficient utilization of shipping space. Present containers of this type are not always constructed so as to permit stacking without damage to the containers themselves or without permitting lateral slippage of an upper container relative to a lower.

Containers of the type under consideration, also are frequently moved by means of fork-lift trucks and/ or pallet trucks. Pallet trucks, as is known, require greater clearance between the underside of an article to be lifted and a supporting surface for such article than is required for a fork-lift truck. In the event that a. container is constructed so as to permit the use of a pallet truck therewith, althongh use of a. fork-like truck therewith necessarily will be permitted, the stacking of such containers normally results in a diminishment in their shipping-spaceutilization efliciency.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide 'an improved sectional shipping container having nestable sections.

It is another object of this invention to provide an improved container of the type under consideration with improved and simplified means for fastening the two sec tions together which not only are readily operable by unskilled labor, but also are less subject to damage than fasteners employed for such purpose heretofore.

It is another object of this invention to provide an improved container of the type under consideration which is less subject to damage during handling than previous types of containers and which is constructed so that the sections of several containers can be nested in any order while at the same time maintaining appreciable clearances between substantially all the confronting areas of the several nesting sections.

It is another object of this invention to provide an improved container of the type under consideration with simplified space-conserving means for attaching lifting or tie-down elements thereto, which means is less subject to damage than those heretofore employed.

It is another object of this invention to provide a container of the type under consideration with leg elements which are readily adjustable in height so as to permit the use of fork-lift trucks for handling, while maintaining a maximum of space utilization efficiency when stacked, 'or which can be adjusted to permit handling of a container by a pallet truck, the container and leg members also being constructed so as to permit stacking of a plurality of containers Without damage to the sections thereof while increasing the stability of a stack of such containers.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description and accompanying rawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is an end elevational view of a sectional container embodying this invention and showing the two sections of the container in their assembled relation.

FIGURE 2 is a side elevational view of the container shown in FIGURE 1, with parts shown in section to illustrate details.

FIGURE 3 is a plan View of the container shown in FIGURE 2.

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view of the container shown in FIGURE 1 and illustrating a lifting bridle attached thereto.

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged fragmentary View of a portion of FIGURE 1 illustrating the mechanism of one of the fa-stenin means employed to secure the two sections or halves of the container in their assembled relation.

FIGURE 6 is a sectional view talren substantially on line 6-6 of FIGURE 5.

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary view corresponding to FIGURE 6 but illustrating the position of the two container sections, and of the parts of the fastening mechanism, immediately prior to operating the latter to secure the two sections together.

FIGURE 8 is a view corresponding to FIGURE but showing only the upper container section and with the fastening mechanism in its stowed condition.

FIGURE 9 is a sectional view taken substantially on line 9-9 of FIGURE 8.

FIGURE 10 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view taken through one of the corners, and through one of the lifting elements thereat, of the container shown in FIGURE 4.

FIGURE 11 is a front elevational view of the lifting element shown in FIGURES 4 and 10.

FIGURE 12 is a side view of the element shown in FIGURE 11.

FIGURE 13 is a plan view of the element shown in FIGURE 11.

FIGURE 14 is an enlarged fragmentary plan view of the corner space between two containers embodying this invention that are in side-by-side abutting relation and also in abutting relation with a common planar wall, and further illustrating the manner of attachment of one of the lifting elements shown in FIGURE 4.

FIGURE 15 is an enlarged fragmentary view of the lower right-hand portion of FIGURE 2 and illustrating the leg construction thereat.

FIGURE 16 is an end view, partly in vertical section, of the leg construction shown in FIGURE 15, and taken from the right-hand end thereof.

FIGURE 17 is a fragmentary view of the underside of the leg construction shown in FIGURE 15.

FIGURE 18 is a fragmentary view of the lower portion of FIGURE 2, illustrating the use of a fork-lift truck with a container embodying this invention.

FIGURE 19 is a view corresponding to FIGURE 18, but illustrating the arrangement of the leg construction to permit use of a pallet truck with the container.

FIGURE 20 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view through a plurality of nested sections of containers embodying this invention.

FIGURE 21 is a view corresponding to FIGURE 20, but illustrating sections nested in an order different from that shown in FIGURE 20.

Referring now to FIGURES 1 to 4 of the drawings, a container embodying the present invention includes upper and lower sections 39 and 32 of substantially identical size and shape. The sections and 32 have, respectively, generally rectangular bases or closed ends 34- (34-U and S t-L, respectively) from which generally trapezoidal side walls 36 (fie-U and 36-L, respectively) diverge toward open mouths 38 (38U and 38L, respectively) that are slightly larger than the bases 34. The sections 3t; and 32 are adapted to be assembled with their open months 33 in opposition and to be secured together about the rims of such months in order to provide an assembled closed container, as illustrated in FIGURES 1 to 4, especially adapted for shipment of bulk material or other products. It is contemplated that a container embodying this invention will be relatively large, having an overall height of the order of something over 4 feet, an overall length approaching 5 feet, and an overall width approaching 4 feet.

The bases 34 and the major portion of the side walls 36 of each section 39 and 32 are formed of relatively thin metal, preferably aluminum, as shown at 40, in FIGURES 5, 10, 20, and 21. The large size of each section renders difficult the formation of the thin metal portions 4t} thereof in one piece, as by a drawing process. Hence, each section 39 and 32 may be formed in three parts, a generally U-shaped center part which forms the base 34 and two longer side walls 36 of the section, and two end parts that may be formed by a drawing or stamping process and are welded to the center part, along weld lines 42 (see FIGURES 2 and 3), to form the shorter side walls. It will be noted that the junctions or corners etween each base 34 and its side walls 36, and between the side walls themselves are smothly rounded. Such construction will minimize damage to the containers during shipment when assembled and filled.

The closed end or base 34 U of the upper section 30 preferably is provided with a plurality of spaced, elongated depressed areas or corrugations 44 extending across the longer dimension of the base for stiffening purposes. The base 34-L of the bottom section 32 likewise is provided with similar stiffening corrugations 46. The ends of the depressed areas 44 and 4-6 terminate short of the lateral edges of their respective bases 34, as shown in FIGURE 3, in order to avoid the manufacturing dif ficulties encountered in extending such areas around the corners between the bases and their side walls 36. The base 34-U of the top section 34) is provided with a entrally-located filling opening having a suitably reinforced rim 48 adapted for the reception of a removable closure, such as a threaded plug 56. A similar drain opening or outlet (not shown) may be provided at a suitable location in the lower section 32.

The open months 38, or rims of the relatively thin metal portions 4t), of the two sections 3t) and 32 are reinforced by heavier endless upper and lower rim elements 52 and 54, respectively. These elements preferably are formed of aluminum extrusions, and their inner sides have smooth uninterrupted peripheral surfaces 56 and 58, that are substantially flush, when the two container sections are assembled, to provide a smooth joint at the meeting edges between the two rim elements 52 and 54, as shown best in FIGURE 6. The inner sides of the rim elements 52 and 54 are recessed along the inner sides of the edge portions thereof remote from the meeting edges of the two elements, as at 66 so that the edge or rim portion of the thin metal portion 4% of the corresponding container sections can be received in such recess and welded therein so as to be substantially flush with the smooth inner peripheral surfaces 56 and 58, as shown in FIGURES 6, 9, 10, 20 and 21.

The meeting edge of the upper rim element 52 is provided with a depending somewhat tapered endless rib or tongue 62, while the meeting edge of the lower rim element 54 is provided with an endless groove 64, generally complementary to the rib but of somewhat greater width and depth. Secured in the groove, as by an appropriate adhesive, is an endless resilient tubular sealing strip or gasket 66. When relaxed, the gasket 66 pro jects slightly above the meeting edge of the lower rim element 54, as shown in FIGURE 7, but is adapted to be compressed by the rib 62 on the upper rim element 52 when the two elements are secured together, as shown in FIGURE 5 and as later explained, in order to form a tight seal between the two container sections 30 and 32 when assembled.

The outer side of the rim element 52 of the upper section 39 is provided with an outwardly-facing peripheral groove or recess 63 of appreciable vertical extent, as shown in FIGURES 5, 6 and 10, while the outer side of the rim element 54 of the lower section 32 is provided with a somewhat similar outwardly-facing peripheral groove or recess 70 of somewhat less width than the recess in the upper rim element. The upper side wall of the recess '79 is undercut so as to provide a depending; somewhat-rounded endless lip 72, best shown in FIG- URES 6 and 7. Above its recess as the outer side of the upper rim element 52 is provided with an outwardly facing endless uninterrupted peripheral surface portion: 74 forming a band that defines the major transverse dimensions of the upper container section 3%. The outer? side of the lower rim element 54, below its recess 70, likewise is provided with a similar outwardly-facing endless uninterrupted peripheral surface portion 76 forming a band, of equal size with the band 74 on the upper rim element 52, and which defines the major transverse dimensions of the lower container section 32. Those portions 75 and 77 of the outer sides of the rim elements 52 and 54, respectively, extending between the recesses 68 and 7t and the respective meeting edges of the elements are disposed somewhat inwardly of the horizontal outline of the side-bounding surfaces or hands l4 and 76 for reasons later explained. Thus, the outer side portions of the rim elements 52 and 554 constituted by the recesses 63 and 76, as well as by the portions 75 and 77, are offset inwardly of the surface portions 74 and 76.

Mounted within and spaced along the recess or groove 63 in the upper rim element are a plurality of toggle mechanisms '78 for detachably fastening and securing the two container sections 30 and 32 together. For example, four such fastening mechanisms may be spaced uniformly along each side of the upper container section 36, as shown in FIGURES l, 2 and 4. Each mechanism 76 includes a pair of peripherally spaced pivot lugs 86, which may be integral with an elongated base 82, suitably secured, as by welding, within and at the lower side of the groove 63, as shown in FIGURES 5 to 9. Extending between and journalled in the lugs 84 is a pivot pin 84 which may be retained in place by means of appropriate split washers 36 snugly embracing circumferential grooves at the opposite projecting ends of the pin. Pivotally mounted on the pin 84 for outward swinging movement about a horizontal axis are the two spaced side flanges 88 of a lever 99 joined, at their inner edges, by a common flat web or base 92. The outer edges of the flanges S8, at locations remote from the pivot pin 84, are provided with oppositely extending ears 94- adapted to be grasped manually for swinging the lever 98. The proportions of the lever 99 are such that when it is in the fastening or section-securing position shown in FIGURES 5 and 6, which is the same as the stowed position shown in FIGURES 8 and 9, such lever is completely confined within the horizontal outline of the side-bounding surface or band 74 of the upper rim element 52.

Secured to and extending between the side flanges 853 of the lever i i), in spaced relation to the lever pivot pin 8- is a pivot pin 96 having pivotally secured thereto one end of a plate-like member constituting a draw link 98. The other end of the link 98 is curved to form a hook Elli) adapted to engage over the curved lip 72 on the lower rim element 54, as shown in i IGURES 5 to 7. The proportions of the link 93 and lever are such that when the depending rib 62 of the upper container section 33 rests on the uncompressed gasket 66 on the lower section 32, the lever can be swung out and the draw link can be swung inwardly so that the hook 1% on the lower end thereof will engage beneath the lip '72 on the lower rim element 54, as shown in FIGURE 7. The lever $8 can then be swung back upwardly into its securing position shown in FIGURES 5 and 6 so as to draw the upper section 33 downwardly into firm engagement with the lower and to compress the gasket 66 to effect a tight seal. As the lever 90 moves into its securing position the pivot pin 96 of the draw link 98 passes slightly beyond dead center, i.e., a line between the axis of the pivot pin 96 and the center of engagement between the hook 109 and the lip 7'2 passes to the right of the lever pivotal axis 34, as shown in FIGURE 6. Consequently, the several toggle mechanisms 73 will securely lock the two container sections together. it will be noted that the draw link 98 is somewhat bent intermediate its ends in order to accommodate the lever pivot pin 34 in the secured position of the mechanism 73. it further will be seen that the outer side of the draw link 98, when in its securing position, is confined within the horizontal outline of the side-bounding surfaces 74 and 76 of the container.

When the container sections 36 and 32 are disassembled, after the fastening mechanisms '78 have been disengaged, the draw link can be swung upward into the stowed position shown in FIGURE 9, wherein the link, along with the lever 96 is confined within the peripheral outline of the side-bounding surface 74 of the upper container section In order to retain the link 93 in such stowed position, detent means are provided for engagement therewith. Such detent means includes opposed protuberances res on the lever flanges 83 adjacent the cars 94, which protuberances are spaced apart a. distance slightly less than the Width of the draw link as. It also will be seen that appropriate detent means, not shown, can be provided to engage and retain the lever 9i) in its securing and stowed positions.

Thus, in both securing and stowed positions, the toggle mechanisms '73 are protected against damage by confinement within the horizontal outline of the surfaces 74 and '76 which define the side boundaries of the container when the sections 3% and 32 are assembled, and of the ections individually when the latter are disassembled and nested as described hereinafter.

The remote edges of the upper and lower rim elements 52 and 5d terminate in lips i104 and M6 spaced outwardly from the sides of the corresponding thin metal portions d ll of the corresponding container sections and 32 in order to provide an undercut edge configuration. This configuration provides an upwardly facing endless circumferential peripheral groove 1% around the element 52 of the upper section 3t? and a corresponding downwardly facing endless peripheral groove lid in the rim element 54 of the lower section 32. By means of this construction it is possible to engage hook-like elements over the lips lblor file and within the groove H93 or lit) for lifting or for tie-down purposes. For example, as shown in FlGURE 4, there are shown four lifting hooks 112 engaged with the lip 1% on the lower container section 32 at the four corners of the latter.

Each hook 112, at its upper end, has a clevis lll l secured thereto, as by a pin 116, for attachment of the hook to a lifting bridle 11%. Preferably, each hook 112 is in the form of a plate-like element having its lower end bent or curved into a hook-shaped configuration, as at 12%, which likewise is curved in a plane transverse to the plane of the hook, as best shown in FIGURES 10, 12 and 13. By means of such latter curvature the hook 112 conforms to the curved shape of the lips and 1% at each corner of the container.

Hooks of this character are preferred so that they can be inserted vertically into the space formed by the rounded corners of abutting containers, as shown in FIGURE 14. In this connection, it will be seen that the smallest such space will be formed when two side-byide abutting containers also abut a common planar Wall, such as 1 .22, as shown in FIUURE 14. The width of the hook 112 should not exceed the maximum transverse dimension of such space. Consequently, the hook 112 can be moved vertically into such space, as shown in the dotted lines, and then swung and moved either to the right or left to engage beneath the lifting lip MP6 of the right or left container. It will be seen that the hooks 112 also can be used effectively for ti -down purposes by engagement with the lip 1% on the upper rim element 5'2 of a container.

The proportions of the rim elements 52 and 5d, and their cross sectional configurations, are such as to permit the sections 34 and 32 of several containers to be nested in any order and in a manner wherein only the rim element 52 or 5d of an inner nested section engages the rim element of an adjacent outer section, while maintaining the thinner metal portions 4d of such sections with appreciable clearance therebetween, as shown in FlGURES 20 and 21. Thus, for example, as shown in 7 FlG-URE 20, two lower container sections 32 are shown in nested condition and an upper container section Si? is shown nested within the innermost lower container section in FIGURE 21, two upper container sec tions 39 are shown nested one within the other while a lower container section 32 is shown nested within the innermost upper container section.

Secured to the base 3dL of the lower section 32, adjacent each corner thereof, as by welding, is a blocklike stub leg 22. The legs 122, are elongated longitudinally of the container and of a hei ht to permit only sufiicient clearance between the undersurface of the lower section base 3d-L and an underlying supporting surface on which the legs rest, to permit the insertion beneath the container of the forks 124 of a fork-lift truck 126, as. shown in FIGURE 18. The bottom of each leg 122 is provided with a socket 123 (FIGURES 15 and 17) that preferably tapers upwardly, while the base lid-U of the top section 3b of the container is provided at each corner thereof, and in vertical registry with the sockets 128 in the legs 12-2 on the lower section 32, with an upwardly tapering stacking lug 13d. It will be seen that when a container is stacked on top of another, the lugs 13% on a lower container will be received in the sockets 12? in the stub legs 12 2 on an upper container so as to stabilize the stack.

Hinged to the outer end of each stub leg 122 is a block-like leg section 132 of substantially the same dimensions as the stub leg 122. The hinged connection may be efiected as by means of a link 13% disposed in confronting recesses in adjacent ends of the stub leg 122 and the leg section 132 and connected to the latter by means of horizontal pivot pins 136. The hinged connection is such as to permit the leg section 132 to be disposed in substantially horizontal alignment with the stub leg 122, as shown in FIGURES 2, l and 18, or to be moved into a position underlying the stub leg, as shown in dotted lines in FIGURE and full lines in FIGURE 19. In this latter position, it will be seen that the effective height of the stub leg 122 will be substantially doubled, thus permitting the use of a pallet truck 1353 with the container, as shown in FIGURE 19. In this connection, it is wellknown that a pallet truck requires greater clearance for insertion beneath an element to be moved than is required for the forks of a fork-lift truck.

The leg section 132 may be retained in either of its two positions by means of a manually operable catch in the form of a hook 146 having a shank reciprocable and rotatable in a bore 1 42 in the section 132. The end of the bore 142 remote from the bight of the hook 144 is enlarged or counterbored for the reception of a coil compression spring 144 that is interposed between the shoulder at the inner end of the counterbore and a washer and a nut 146 threaded on the end of the hook shank, as shown in FIGURES l6 and 17. The point f the hook El i-t is insertable through an aperture 148 in the side of the leg section for projecting into a recess 150 therein. The base 34-1.: of the lower section 32 is provided with a depending lug 152 receivable in the recess 154 in the leg section 132 when the latter is in its hori zontal aligned position. A recess in the lug 152 is adapted to receive the point of the hook ltd-t in order to retain the leg section in such position, as shown in FIG- URES 15 and 16. The stub leg 122 is provided with a pin hole 154 in one side so that when the leg section 132 is moved to its lowermost leg-underlying position, the hook 149 can be pulled out and swung around through 180 and reinserted into the pin hole 154 in the leg 122 to thus lock the leg section in the position shown in dotted lines in FIGURE 15.

It thus will be seen that the objects of this invention have been fully and elfectively accomplished. It will be realized, however, that the foregoing specific embodiment has been shown and described only for the purpose of illustrating the principles of this invention and is subject to o extensive change without departure from such principles. Therefore, this invention includes all modifications encompassed within the spirit and scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. A shipping container for bulk material comprising: a pair of bowl-like container sections of approximately equal height, each having a generally rectangular base and trapezoidal side walls which diverge slightly from said base toward a somewhat larger open month, said sections being adapted selectively to be assembled with their open months in opposition and secured together to provide a closed container or to be detached and nested when empty, each of said sections being formed for the most part of relatively-thin metal having secured thereto an endless heavier reinforcing rim element, said elements having generally complementary interfittable edge configurations for forming a tight joint between said sections in their assembled relation, and said rim elements being rovided on their outer sides with recessed configurations, the recessed configurations in one of said rim elements having undercut sidewall portions facing away from the open mouth of the corresponding section; and a plurality of toggle means spaced about the periphery of said sections for detachably securing the latter together in their assembled relation, each of said toggle means comprising a lever mounted in a recessed configuration in the other of said rim elements for pivotal movement about a horizontal axis between an outer section-releasing position and an inner section-securing or stowed position wherein said lever is received substantially completely within its said recessed configuration, and a draw link having one end thereof pivotally mounted on said lever and the other end thereof provided with hook means for detachable engagement with a said undercut side wall portion of a recessed configuration in said one rim element.

2. The structure defined in claim -1 in which the other rim element has, along that edge portion thereof remote from the open mouth of the corresponding section, an outwardly-facing uninterrupted endless peripheral surface portion defining the major transverse dimension of said section, each of the toggle means being confined within the horizontal outline of said surface portion in both section-securing and stowed posit-ions.

3. The structure defined in claim 1 in which the one rim element has, along the edge portion thereof remote from the open mouth of the corresponding section, an outwardly-facing uninterrupted endless peripheral surface portion defining the major transverse dimension of said section, each of the toggle means being confined within the horizontal outline of said surface portion when engaged with the undercut side wall portion.

4. The structure defined in claim 1 in which both rim elements have, along those edge portions thereof remote from the open mouths of their respective sections, outwardly-facing uninterrupted endless peripheral surface portions which are substantially in vertical registry when said sections are in their assembled relation and which define the major transverse dimensions of said sections, each of the toggle means being confined within the horizontal outline of said surface portions in section-securing position.

5. The structure defined in claim 1 in which the sections and rim elements are constructed and arranged so that one element rests on the other when either of said sections is nested in the other in a manner so that the weight of the inner section is supported on the rim element of the outer section "with the base and side wall portions of said sec tions which are formed of the relatively thin metal being spaced apart throughout their entire confronting areas.

6. The structure defined in claim 1 in which the interfit-table edge configurations comp-rise an endless rib on the edge of one rim element and an endless groove in the other, and including a resilient compressible sealing strip in said groove.

7. The structure defined in claim 1 in which the arm, when disengaged from the undercut side wall portion, is movable into a stowed position extending generally in the same direction as, and away from the pivotal axis of, the lever for reception with the lever substantially completely within the recessed configuration on the other rim element.

8. The stmcture defined in claim 7 including detent means carried by each toggle means for releasably retaining the arm in its stowed position.

9. A shipping container for bulk material comprising: a pair of bowl-like container sections of approximately equal height, each having a generally rectangular base and trapezoidal side Walls which diverge slightly from said base toward a somewhat larger open mouth, said sections being adapted selectively to be assembled with their open mouths in opposition and secured together to provide a closed container or to be detached and nested when empty, each of said sections being formed, for the most part of relatively-thin metal having secured thereto an endless thicker reinforcing rim element, said rim elements having generally complementary interfi-ttable edge configurations for forming a tight joint between said sections in their assembled relation, said rim elements having along the edge portions thereof remote iirorn the open mouths of their corresponding sections outwardly-facing uninterrupted endless peripheral surface portions of the same horizontal outline and defining, when said sections are in their assembled relation, the major transverse dimensions of said container with the outer side portions of said rim elements extending between said surfiace portions being offset inwardly of the latter; selectively engageable and disengageable rmeans located at and engageable with said outer side portions of said rim elements to selectively secure said sections together in their assembled relation or permit detachment and nesting thereof when empty, said means being disposed within the horizontal outline of said surface portions in both securing and detached positions.

10. The structure defined in claim 9 in which each rim element terminates, along that edge thereof remote from the open mouth of the corresponding section, in an endless rib spaced outwardly of the side walls of the corresponding section and engageab le by hook means for container tie-down or lifting purposes.

11. A shipping container for bulk material comprising: a pair of upper and lower bowl-like container sections of approximately equal height, each having a generally rectangular base and trapezoidal side walls which diverge slightly from said base toward a. somewhat larger open month, said sections being adapted selectively to be assembled with their open months in opposition and secured together to provide a closed container or to be detached and nested when empty, each of said sections being formed for the most part of relatively-thin metal having secured thereto an endless heavier rein-forcing rim element, said elements having generally complementary interfittable edge configurations for forming a tight joint between said sections in their assembled relation, said lower section being provided, adjacent each corner of its base, with a stub leg having in the lower end thereof an upwardly tapering socket, and said upper section being provided, at each of the corners of its base, with an upwardly tapering stacking lug substantially complementary to and for reception within the sockets in the stub legs of another container for stabilizing two such assembled containers in stacked relation, said stub legs being of a length to provide only sufficient clearance between the base of said lower section and an underlying 'surfiace for :the reception of the fork of a fork-lint truck; and a leg section hinged to each of said stub legs for pivotal movement between a substantially upright portion beneath and in engagement with said stub leg and a substantially horizontal position wherein said leg section does not project below the lower end of said stub leg; and manually-operable means for locking said leg section in either of said positions, said leg section, in upright position, being effective to increase said clearance to an extent only sufficient to receive a pallet truck.

12. A shipping container for bulk material comprising: a pair of upper and lower bow=l-like container sections of approximately equal height, each having a generally rectangular base and trapezoidal side walls which diverge slightly from said base toward a somewhat larger open month, said sections being adapted selectively to be assembled their open months in opposition and secured together to provide a closed container or to be detached and nested when empty, each of said sections being formed for the most part of relatively-thin metal having secured there-to an endless heavier reinforcing rim element, said elements having generally complementary interfittable edge configurations for forming a tight joint between said sections in their assembled relation, said lower section being provided, adjacent each 'eorner of its base, with a stub leg of a length to provide only sufficient clearance between the base of said lower section and an underlying surface for the reception of the fork of a fork-lift truck; and a leg section hinged to each of said stub legs for pivotal movement between a substantially upright position beneath and in engagement with said stub leg and a substantially horizontal position wherein said leg section does not project below the lower end of said stub leg, said leg sections in upright position being effective to increase aid clearance to an extent only sufiicient to receive a pallet truck; and manually operable means for locking each of said leg sections in either of said positions.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 112,214 Brewer Feb. 28, 1871 1,966,681 Petersen July 17, 1934 2,457,842 Smith Jan. 4, 1949 2,693,706 'Rawson Nov. 9, 1954 2,806,368 Koch Aug. 20; 1957 2,918,190 Martin Dec. 22, 1959 FOREIGN PATENTS 7,643 Great Britain of 1900

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Classifications
U.S. Classification220/1.5, 220/4.7, 220/378, 220/628, 206/518, 220/315
International ClassificationB65D21/02, B65D21/032, B65D90/02, B65D90/08, B65D88/02, B65D88/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D21/0234, B65D7/42
European ClassificationB65D21/02G, B65D7/42