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Publication numberUS3113712 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 10, 1963
Filing dateNov 14, 1960
Priority dateNov 14, 1960
Publication numberUS 3113712 A, US 3113712A, US-A-3113712, US3113712 A, US3113712A
InventorsHarold V Kindseth
Original AssigneeBemis Bro Bag Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Transporting and dispensing container
US 3113712 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 10, 1963 H. v. KINDSETH TRANSPORTING AND DISPENSING CONTAINER 4 Sheets-Sheet 1' Filed NOV. 14, 1960 IN V EN TOR. fl/IROL o Mhuvossm ATTORNEY! Dec. 10, 1963 v, sETH 3,113,712

TRANSPORTING AND DISPENSING CONTAINER Filed NOV. 14. 1960 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. HAROLD M/(mossrn Dec. 10, 1963 H. v. KINDSETH TRANSPORTING AND DISPENSING CONTAINER 4 She ets-Sheet 5 Filed NOV- 14, 1960 INVENTOR.

HAROLD V. lfl/vosgrl-l BY Arromvsv:

Dec. 10, 1963 H. v. KINDSETH 3,113,712

TRANSPORTING AND DISPENSING CONTAINER Filed Nov. 14, 1960 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 I I -I I I I I 92- I I [74 72 I "i i I 22 I I I l I I I I I I I I L .I l ls f -7a FIGJ4 v FIG./5

-x C) I ma) I I 97 99 I a 9 INVENTOR.

HARaLo M/fnvossrn AT-raR/VEYJ 1- 3,113,712 lcfi Patented Dec. 10, 1953 3,113,712 TRANSPGRTENG AND DISPENSING CONTAINER Harold V. Kindseth, Minneapolis, Minn, assignor to Bemis Bro. Bag Company, Minneapolis, Minn, a corporation of Missouri Filed Nov. 14, 1960, Ser. No. 68,991 3 Claims. (6!. 2219-14) This invention is a novel lined container for transporting and dispensing fiowable materials. Specifically the novelty resides in having portions of the open end of the liner through which the carton is filled adhered to opposed flaps before filling and sealing the container which aids in filling the container and in aligning the top portions of the liner during the sealing operation. Yet another point of novelty resides in having the liner portion, which becomes a part of a dispensing spout, cover all of the inside of the carton portion of the dispensing spout whereby the carton material and contents of the carton are mutually protected from each other during dispensing. Another novel feature of this invention consists in the use of tenacious but nonhardening glue to secure the liner to the carton blank thus limiting the amount of stress that can be applied to the liner by distorting the container and minimizing abrasion of the liner by hard adhesive that has become brittle. A further feature that is novel in this construction consists in having, opposing the spout flap, a flap in which a slot is cut to receive the end of the spout flap and liner for purposes or" closing the container when partial dispensing only of its contents is desired.

There are many forms of lined cartons currently being used in packaging fiowable materials. Flowable materials are defined herein as being those materials that can be poured through a spout. This would include liquids and many dry, finely divided materials. Among the flowable materials, perhaps most difiicult to package eliec tively are the liquids. Many of the particularly difficult problems arising in packaging have to do with liquid, and as a result this disclosure will describe specifically though only illustratively, a unit that is capable of effectively transporting and dispensing liquid.

A good many of the lined cartons which have been proposed heretofore are filled at the end of the carton which will eventually become the bottom of the unit, as it is shipped and used. An apparently common reason for doing this is that the top of the carton is provided with a pouring spout structure which requires relatively difficult folding and closing operations which are best carried out when the device is empty. They are often formed over a rigid mandrel to allow the materials to be pressed.

Most of these preseal d top structures are often of such a nature also as to require the carton to be what is known as a set-up carton that is not capable of being folded fiat for shipping and storage prior to being filled with the product. A more important disadvantage of the bottom filled carton, however, is the fact that the seal which must be made after the carton is filled is the one which must resist leakage under the full head pressure of the contents of the package plus any additional pressure developed as a result of surging the contents or stacking cartons one on top of the other in larger units such as a case. Thus the liner of a liquid transporting carton must be sealed wtih absolute perfection or leaks are sure to develop which will cause great difiiculties. A

single leaker can cause an entire case or maybe several cases of a shipment to be damaged beyond the point of salability. Thus it is preferable to keep the seal which must be made after the carton is filled at the top of the carton where it must resist only pressures developed as the result of sloshing of the contents within the package as distinguished from the full head pressure of the package contents. Of the existing lined cartons known to be top filled, all have a rather elaborate fabricated liner construction to avoid one or more of the difiiculties mentioned above. In so avoiding these difficulties, however, they create another one which is the expense of such a fabricated liner.

Another solution which has been proposed is the constant filling of liner materials being extruded over a hollow nozzle or being seam sealed around such ahollow filling nozzle and sealing off the container as it reaches a desired length giving it the measure of content desired for the package. As the measured units are pinched ofi like sausage links, they are dropped into protective cartons. Such a solution obviously requires expensive equipment and for this reason is not widely used. In

spite of all of these difficulties involved in making a good lined carton, there are sufiicient advantages in an adequate unit to have brought forth considerable inventive effort toward developing a really good lined carton. An advantage of obvious importance is the fact that lined containerboard cartons are not breakable, as are glass bottles. Furthermore, a lined carton is much lighter than a glass container, and if the carton were foldable before being filled, would require considerably less storage space. Sides of a containerboard carton provide excellent surfaces on which to print advertising and suggestions for uses of the contents of the package. Since containerboard cartons are thrown away, no cleaning or perhaps sterilizing equipment need be provided by the packager. In many instances a lined carton with a properly designed pouring spout actually pours more easily and with less dripping than a glass container. Furthermore, the con tents of a containerboard package equipped with a liner is better suited to protecting the contents from the destructive affects of light than is true of even a colored glass container. In some cases, as for example, in packing distilled water, the lined carton can actually receive without damage Water of a hotter temperature than can ordinary glass. The only glass container which can be filled with hot water would be made of a relatively expensive glass having a low coefficient of expansion. Obviously lined cartons have numerous advantages if one could be devised that is satisfactory from the standpoint of ease of erection from a collapsed condition and that can be filled and sealed well and consistently. Preferably this structure would also incorporate an excellent pouring spout which is of such a nature that it can be readily sealed after the carton is filled rather than requiring pro-filling construction of it.

Accordingly the principal objects of this invention are to provide a lined dispensing container that can be manufactured inexpensively, shipped flat, and quickly, easily and accurately erected for filling and sealing at the point of use.

Other objects of this invention include providing a lined container having the attributes described immediately above which also is filled through the top and which incorporates structure to assist in quickly and accurately placing the liner in a sealing position.

A still further object of this invention consists in having the flaps to which the liner is adhered constitute pouring spout and rescaling flaps so that the liner is connected to the spout flap.

Yet another object of this invention is to provide a lined carton which is constructed and arranged as to minimize the possibility of leakage.

A further object of the invention is to provide a top flap structure Which can be reclosed after partially dispensing the contents of the container.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a dispensing container which, in some of its forms, may have the liner portion that combines with a carton flap to form a pouring spout adhered thereto as to extend across a cutting line marked on the carton fiap whereby both the carton flap and liner are cut simultaneously.

A still further object of this invention is to provide the dispensing container for liquids which can be filled with liquid hotter than an ordinary glass container can safely receive.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a container having a pouring spout which can be reclosed and at the same time which spout is covered on the inside entirely with the liner so that none of the contents of the container touch any of the exterior strength providing portion of the carton when being poured from.

Yet another object of this invention is to provide a lined container, the liner of which remains sealed against the entrance of air until it is being set up for use.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a lined carton construction that has no sharp corners on the carton blank or other structure which could abrade or otherwise damage the liner material.

Other objects of the invention will become apparent as the description proceeds.

To the accomplishment of the foregoing and related ends, this invention then comprises the features hereinafter fully described and particularly pointed out in the claims, the following description setting forth in detail certain illustrative embodiments of the invention, these being indicative, however, of but a few of the various ways in which the principles of the invention may be employed.

The invention is illustrated by the drawings in which the same numerals refer to corresponding parts and in which:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevation of a knocked down carton with portions thereof broken away to illustrate the structure more fully; broken lines illustrate hidden parts, and fold lines and perforated lines;

FIGURE 2 is a view similar to FIGURE 1 except from the other side of the carton;

FIGURE 3 is an isometric view of the carton erected for filling; broken lines illustrate hidden parts, fold, and perforated lines;

FIGURE 4 is a view in fragment similar to FIGURE 3 with the spout and retuck flaps held down to arrange the liner for sealing and with the seal made; broken lines illustrate hidden parts, sealed, fold and perforated lines;

FIGURE 5 is a view like FIGURE 4 with the liner seal folded flat and the two side flaps folded in; broken lines illustrate hidden parts, fold lines and perforated lines;

FIGURE 6 is a view like FIGURE 5 with a retuck flap folded in and glued into position;

FIGURE 7 is a View showing the carton like FIGURE 6, but with the carton sealed ready for shipping;

FIGURE 8 is a plan view of the top of the carton as illustrated in FIGURE 7;

FIGURE 9 is a view like FIGURE 7 except that the spout flap has been torn open in preparation for use;

FIGURE 10 is a view similar to FIGURE 9 with the spout flap severed ready for pouring;

FIGURE 11 is a view similar to FIGURE 10 with the carton shown being poured from;

FIGURE 12 is a view similar to FIGURE 10 with the spout flap retucked to reclose the carton after partial dispensing of its contents;

FIGURE 13 is an isometric view of the carton liner in the same position as it would appear without the carton around it in FIGURE 4; broken lines illustrate hidden parts;

FIGURE 14 is a side elevational view of a knocked down modified form of the lined carton; portions of the structure are broken away to illustrate construction more fully; broken lines illustrate hidden parts, fold lines and perforated lines;

FIGURE 15 is an isometric view of the modified form of carton shown in FIGURE 14 erected and ready 4 to be filled; broken lines illustrate hidden parts and fold lines; and

FIGURE 16 is a plan view of 1a modified form of the invention in which the dimensions of the carton and liner are such as to permit the cutoff line on the spout fiap to interesect a glue spot that secures the liner thereto.

Referring specifically to the drawings, and particularly to FIGURES l-1 3, one form of practical embodiment of the invention is shown to comprise a cardboard carton blank which is die cut and scored in order to form panels, tabs and the like in a manner that is generally well known. Specifically for purposes of this embodiment, the blank is die cut and scored to provide the body panels 39, 31, 32 and 34 as shown in FIGURES 1 and 2. The separate gluing tab 35 is formed adjacent to the edge of body panel 30' and scored. It is glued to the body panel 31 to close the container along the vertical edge between panels 3il3l. The blank is also provided with the usual closure tabs, and the bottom ones are designated 36, 57, 38 and 39.

Enclosed in the canton blank as shown in FIGURES 1 and 2 is a flexible liquid-proof liner which comprises an extruded tube designated 449. It is sealed at the bottom end by forming a suitable seam as shown at 41. The liner is open or crush cut at its top end 42 to form a frangible seal for reasons set out fully below. Suitable adhesive placed at the points designated $4 for panel 38 and 45 for panel 32 adheres liner 40 to opposed body panels.

As the primary purpose of gluing the liner to the carton sides is to permit erecting the liner with the carton, a suitable adhesive must be sufiiciently strong to pull the evacuated liner open against air pressure tending to hold it closed. Yet this glue should yield its bond at a value substantially below the tensile strength of the liner film being used to prevent tearing of the liner material as a result of sudden distortion of the carton. Such distortion could easily result from accidental dropping of the filled carton or other rough handling in use. The strength of the bond created by the adhesive obviously will have various limits depending on the type and thickness of the film being employed in the liner. It must always, however, :be of sufficient strength to draw the sides of the liner out with the carton sides, as the latter is erected. Additionally it is desirable that the adhesive have the property of remaining soft, and at least not be come hard and brittle, as many adhesives do. Brittle adhesives which might crack and form sharp points if the carton were bent or dented at the point of gluing could pinch, pierce, or abrade the liner sufliciently to cause the carton to become a leaker. Another valuable property that is most desirable in an adhesive used with this product is one which elongates relatively easily and to a high degree without releasing its bond. Such an adhesive would minimize stresses placed on the liner resulting from distortion of the carton without actually releasing the liner from the canton. Since it is rather difficult to describe with precision the characteristics of the preferred adhesive used with this car-ton construction an example of a satisfactory adhesive is identified as the product of Stein, Hall & Co., Inc., 285 Madison Avenue, New York, New York, identified as their produot =Filmgrip No. 1.

At the top of the container blank are the tabs designated 4 6, 47, 48 and 49. The flaps 46 and 48 are also adhered to the liner by suitable adhesive at points near their centers with reference to panels 31 and 34 as shown by the patches 50 and 51 illustrated with broken lines. All corners on the carton blank are rounded to minimize the danger of damage to liner 40 when it is being assembled with the containerboard cartonblank.

Flap 46 is one that will become a pouring spout when the device is opened and consequently is referred to as a spout fiap. It has a tab portion designated 52 that ex tends above its top center to permit ready grasping of the spout flap when it is desired to open the carton. A pair of perforated lines designated 54 extend from the lower corners of the flap 45 outward to the edges of tab 52. When the carton is opened by pulling upward on tab 52, therefore, \the portion of flap 46 is separated from the rest of the carton along the lines 5454 and since the liner is adhered .to it will withdraw a portion of the liner at the same time. A premarked cut or severance mark 55 may be seen to extend across the tab. If the liner is pulled out past this line, a out along it will sever not only the tab but also a portion of the liner adhered to the tab.

Tab 48 has in it a slot designated 56. The purpose of this slot is to receive the end of the spout portion of the spout flap 46 to reclose the container after a portion of the contents of the carton have been dispensed. Liner 4!) also may be adhered to top flap 48 in FIGURE 2. By retucking the spout back into slot 56 the carton can be held closed to prevent contamination of the remaining contents. Because flap 48 has the retuck slot 56 in it, it will be referred to frequently hereafter as a retuck flap. Flaps 4-7 and 49 are the two top side or end flaps. The sides of both flaps 47 and 49 adjacent to flap 46 at least are cutback at 57 for flap 47 and 58 for flap 49. These cutbacks 57-58 leave room for the spout portion of the liner to expand when it is being employed in pouring.

The carton is thus far described as a fiat unit which has been completely manufactured and is ready to be shipped to a user. At the point of use and if the carton is one intended for packaging sterile products such as pharmaceutical or drinking water, distilled or spring, top 42 is slightly sealed. To provide a clear disclosure of this seal it is one such as is created by crush cutting a thermoplastic liner, as it is extruded. When such a germ free sealed liner is incorporated in the carton, the first step in preparation for use is to break this seal by distorting the liner, as is generally understood. The carton is then erected by pressure applied to the edges of the fiat container. Pressure applied to the flat container at the two points 59 and 60 which are, respectively the edges of joinder between the panels 34 and 30 for point 59 and 3132 for the point 60 will cause the carton to assume a rectangular shape in cross section as illustrated in FIG- URE 3. Because the liner is adhered to the carton on opposed body panels and opposed top flaps, the liner is also erected along with the container exterior container board element so that the mouth 42 of the liner is held open as shown in FIGURE 3.

After the carton is erected, flaps 39 and 37 are folded inward and then flaps 36 and 38 in that order with appropriate adhesive applied thereto so that the bottom of the box is sealed. That portion of liner 40 which tends to be below the lower flap fold line adjacent to the body panels is merely tucked inside the container at the time the flaps are turned in. While the liner is not completely smooth thus folded in, it is nevertheless, supported by the carton and no rupturing strain is applied to seam 41.

Since seal 41 is made on liner 40 under ideal conditions immediately following extrusion and before the latter is placed inside the carton, the seal is an especially good one which assures that the bottom of the liner will be liquid tight. Since it is more difiicult to resist leakage at the bottom of the container with the entire head of pressure of the container liquid resting on it than at the top, the most advantageous portion of the liner to preseal is the bottom.

Once the carton is filled the problem is then to seal the carton top. This is made relatively easy and eflicient by reason of the fact that the liner 40 is adhered to flaps 48 and 46 at their top centers. When these two flaps are pulled down as shown in FIGURE 4, the liner 4i assumes the position shown in that figure by reason of being adhered to the flaps 46 and 48. With top 42 of liner 4%) held as shown in FIGURE 4, suitable seaming means can 6 apply a seal, as at 61 to close the top of the liner 40 against leakage. Ideally this seal should be formed immediately adjacent flaps 46-48, and is always formed as close thereto as circumstances allow. The position of the seal 61 in FIGURE 4 is spaced farther from the flaps 4648 than can actually be accomplished in use and may be said to be a conservative showing of what can be done with the structure herein. Since the principal leakage against which seal 61 is directed is that caused by the sloshing of the contents of the container, the excellent seal that can be made at 61 is more than adequate. At the same time having the liner positioned as shown in FIG- URE 4, greatly simplifies making an excellent liquid tight seal. This combination of the presealed bottom and liner top aligning structure insures an almost fool proof seal for the entire carton and also greatly facilitates closing the top of the carton altogether.

As soon as the seal is achieved at 61, flaps 47 and 49 may be folded down as shown in FIGURE 5 after first flattening a portion of the liner in which seam 61 is made. With flaps 47 and 49 in position, flap 48 may then be closed down upon the first two flaps. The flap 48 is of course spot glued to the flaps 47 and 49 in the position illustrated in FIGURE 6. Finally then the spout flap 46 may be placed in its closed position as illustrated in FIGURES 6 and 7 and spot glued in the triangles outside the perforated lines 54-54. The carton is thus held closed by reason of all the flaps being closed until such time as a user desires to dispense a portion of the contents thereof.

When the carton is to be opened, tab 52 is grasped and pulled straight upward. In so doing flap 46 is torn along the perforated lines 5454 and a portion of the flap known as the spout is extended as shown in FIGURE 9.

As shown in FIGURES l0 and 11, space is provided for the spout portion of liner 49 between the edge of flap 48 and the base of flap 46, because flaps 47 and 49 are cut back at 57 and 53 respectively. At this time the tab portion outlined by lines 5454 is severed across the predetermined severance line 55. A portion of liner 40 may be severed also by this cut as pointed out above. Alternatively the liner is cut separately} The result is opening 62 shown in FIGURES 10 and 11. The contents of the liner 4i! may be poured from the container once the flap 46 has thus been extended and opening 62 provided by cutting on severance line 55. While the preferred form of pouring position is illustrated in FIGURE 11, it is pointed out that the liner is coextensive with the carton portion of the spout so that however the contents of the container are poured from the carton the liner is between the carton contents and the pasteboard portion of the spout.

When as much of the contents of the container has been dispensed as desired, the carton is righted again to the position shown in FIGURE 10 and the liner flattened as shown in that figure. It is then possible by bending the spout portion of flap 46 back toward the carton top and depressing the end of the spout to insert it into slots 56 in order to reclose the carton until further withdrawal of its contents is desired. FIGURE 12 illustrates the appearance of the carton when thus reclosed.

FIGURE 13 is an idealized isometric presentation of the liner alone as it would be in when positioned in the carton shown in FIGURE 4. Note that the bottom seal 41 of the container extends from one corner of the rectangular liner to the other while the top seal extends straight across the liner sideways. This pattern of the seals occurs, because seal 41 is made when the liner is flat before it is inserted in the carton blank. Bottom seal 41, therefore, extends straight across the knocked down carton blank as shown in FIGURES 1 and 2. When the carton is erected, however, byapplying pressure at the points 59-60 the seal 41 then extends from corner to corner in the carton.

While the invention has been illustrated as being particularly advantageous in creating a carton having a pouring spout, it is obvious that there are substantial advantages derived from having the liner secured to opposed tabs even if no pouring spout is to be formed. It is advantageous, for example, in any lined carton to have a filling opening that opens with precision and consistency, as a knocked down carton is erected. Furthermore, it is always advantageous to have the top of the liner sealed quickly and precisely as at 61 in FIGURE 4. This result is achieved with considerable ease by having the liner mouth adhered to any opposed flaps so that the liner opening edges are aligned smoothly when the flaps to which the liner is adhered are folded outward to a position at right angles to the body panels of the carton.

Liner 40 may be made from any flexible film that is suitable for the material to be packaged in the carton. It must, of course, be a material that is impervious to the expected contents thereof. This liner material may be selected from any of the plastic film commonly used in the packaging industry. Polyethylene has been found suitable for most purposes, but in the event that the package is to be filled with hot water, as for example in the case of packaging distilled water straight from the still, the material should be polypropylene or high density poly ethylene. Other suitable materials may be used for dry flowables such as the laminated liners used in packaging dry fiowables. If thermoplastic film is used, the seams 41 and 61 are preferably made by heat sealing.

FIGURES l4 and 15 illustrate a modified form of the invention wherein the two larger body panels 70 and 71 are positioned directly opposite each other when the carton is folded flat. This result is achieved by having the two side body panels 72 and 74 respectively scored down their centers as represented by the broken line 75 in FIGURE 15 so that half of each of the side panels is in a plane with one of the main body panels 71-70 when the carton is folded fiat as shown in FIGURE 14. Other than this distinction, the carton of the modified form is very similar to that shown in the principally illustrated form of the invention.

The modified carton has main bottom flaps 7 6, 77 and the side bottom flaps 78 and 79. It also is provided with the spout flap 80 and the retuck flap 81. There are side top flaps designated 82 and S4. Spout flap 89 is provided with the perforated line 85 and a severance line 86 comparable to the line 54-54 and 55 in FIGURES 1 through 13. Retuck fiap 81 is provided with the slot 87 into which the spout may be retucked. The carton is pro vided with a flexible waterproof liner in the form of an extruded tube 88 Which is provided with a bottom seam 89. The liner 88 is adhered to the body panels 70 and 71 and to the flaps 80-81 in a similar manner to the disclosure in FIGURES 1 through 13. Glue spot 90 shows the location of the adherence of liner 38 to the flap 80. Flap 81 may have a similar glue spot (not shown).

The form of carton shown in FIGURES 14 and 15 is erected by pushing on the edge portions 91 and 92 respectively, and thereafter, it is secured in erected condition, filled, sealed, opened for use and reclosed in a manner substantially identical with the form of the invention shown in FIGURES 113.

In the modified form of the device shown in FIGURE 16, a desirable result is achieved by having the liner glued to the spout flap near its extremity. If the size requirements of the carton admit of doing so, the sides 94 and 95 are reduced in width so that the liner 96 when positioned for sealing will have sufficient length to extend out to the cutoif line 97 of the pouring spout flap 98. Liner 96 is spot glued as at 99 and particularly at 109 which spot will be noted overlies or is intersected by a cutoff line 97. When a carton fabricated in this manner is open for use, as shown in FIGURE 16, and a cut is made along 97, the liner 96 is inevitably severed in such a way as to open a pouring spout. Furthermore, the liner must necessarily then extend out .to the edge of the pouring spout to assure protection of the container boar'd against contamination by the contents of the package being poured therefrom and likewise protect the contents from contamination by the container flap 98. This form of the carton as in the case of those previously disclosed is provided with a retuck flap 1&1 in which there is a slot .102 into which the pouring spout may be placed to reseal the unit after partial use of the contents. In all other respects this structure is similar to those previously disclosed; liner 96 being sealed across the top as at lil3 in the same manner as disclosed previously for the other forms. The side flaps are out back also as at 104 and 105 to provide room for the pouring spout when the contents of the device are being dispensed.

It is apparent that many modifications and variations of this invention as hereinbefore set forth may be made without departing from the spirit and scope thereof. The specific embodiments described are given by way of example only and the invention is limited only by the terms of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A knockdown, lined transporting and dispensing container comprising; a carton having body walls and flaps at the ends thereof; two opposed flaps at the upper end of said carton being a slotted retuck flap and a spout flap respectively, a liner sealed and not adhered to flaps at its bottom but spot adhered to opposed body walls of said carton by rows of spots of adhesive extending down the edges thereof, said liner having its other end projecting beyond said retuck and spout flaps; said liner being adhered to said spout flap; said spout flap having a portion extending beyond its center marginal edge to form a lifting tab; said spout flap having perforations extending in lines from the edges of said lifting tab to the base of said spout flap at its point of joinder to a wall of the said container, said spout flap having means on the exterior thereof to designate a point of severance for said spout flap and the portion of said liner adhered thereto; said point of severance on said spout flap being spaced farther from the point of joinder of said spout flap to a wall of said container than the distance of the slot in said slotted retuck flap from the point of joinder of said spout flap to a wall of said container whereby after said spout flap is severed it may be folded down and tucked into the slot of said slotted retuck flap; the adherence of said liner to said spout flap being confined to an area defined by the base of said spout flap and said performations; the corner of the flaps of said carton being rounded; the adhesive used in securing portions of said liner to said carton being non-hardening and providing a bond of less strength than the tensile strength of the material from which said liner is made.

2. A knockdown transporting and dispensing container comprising: a carton having a plurality of articulated side walls, sealing flaps articulated to each end of each side Wall, a liner comprising a tube of flexible Watertight material sealed tightly at one end and lightly at the other and adhered to opposed side walls of said container by rows of separate spots of adhesive extending along the edges thereof; said tube liner closure comprising a straight transverse seal; said liner being positioned in said carton to have said seal extend fiat across said carton in its knocked down condition, the sealed end of said liner remaining free from the flaps at its end of said container; the opposite end of said tube liner extending beyond the flaps at its end of said container and ad hered by at least one spot of adhesive to at least one flap; the adhesive used to secure portions of said liner to said carton being non-hardening and providing a bond of less strength than the tensile strength of the material from which said liner is made said flaps having rounded corners.

3. A knockdown, lined tnansporting and dispensing container comprising: a carton having body walls and flaps at the ends thereof articulated to each other and when knocked down forming a flattened tube; two opposed flaps at the upper end of said carton being a slotted retuck flap and a spout flap respectively, a liner securely sealed at its bottom, spot adhered to opposed body walls of said carton by rows of separate spots of adhesive extending in lines down the edges of said opposed body Wall, and having its other end lightly sealed and projecting beyond said ret-uck and spout flaps; said liner being adhered to said spout flap; said sealed end of said l-iner not adhered to said cart-on, said liner being a flattenable tube lying flat within said carton in its knocked down condition with the seals of said liner extending straight transversely across said knocked down carton; said spout flap having a portion extending beyond its center marginal 15 edge to form a lifting tab; said spout flap having perforations extending in lines from the edges of said lifting tab to the base of said spout flap at its point of joinder to a wall of the said container, said spout flap having means -on the exterior thereof to designate a point of severance for said spout flap and a portion of said liner; said point of severance on said spout flap being spaced farther from the point of joinder of said spout flap to a wall of said container than the distance of the slot in said slotted retuck flap from the point of joinder of said spout flap 1G to a wall of said container whereby after said spout flap is severed it may be folded down and tucked into the slot of said slotted retuck flap; the adherence of said liner to said spout flap being confined to an area defined by the base of said spout flap and said perforations; the corners of the flaps of said carton being rounded; the adhesive used in securing portions of said liner to said carton being non-hardening and providing a bond of less strength than the tensile strength of the material from which said liner is made.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 695,273 Birnie Mar. 11, 1902 1,956,159 Reilly Apr. 24, 1934 2,151,202 Guyer Mar. 21, 1939 2,337,730 Berch Dec. 28, 1943 2,361,876 Schell Oct. 31, 1944 2,369,654 Berch Feb. 20, 1945 2,387,272 Klein Oct. 23, 1945 2,930,517 Mensing et a1 Mar. 29, 1960 2,950,037 Orsini Aug. 23, 1960 FOREIGN PATENTS 832,372 Great Britain Apr. 6, 1960

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3190531 *Oct 25, 1962Jun 22, 1965Ingvar Holmstrom KjellContainer
US3288345 *May 12, 1964Nov 29, 1966Akerlund & Rausing AbPackaging box
US3297226 *Jun 9, 1964Jan 10, 1967Scholle Container CorpPackaging
US3344971 *Dec 6, 1965Oct 3, 1967Domtar LtdLined box
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Classifications
U.S. Classification229/222, 229/117.32, 383/202, 383/906, 229/117.33
International ClassificationB65D5/60
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/606, Y10S383/906
European ClassificationB65D5/60B2