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Publication numberUS3114361 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 17, 1963
Filing dateOct 24, 1961
Priority dateOct 24, 1961
Publication numberUS 3114361 A, US 3114361A, US-A-3114361, US3114361 A, US3114361A
InventorsMullen Wilbur L
Original AssigneeMullen Wilbur L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spring tension device
US 3114361 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 17, 1963 w. L. MULLEN SPRING TENSION DEVICE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 24, 1961 R mu% w. R 0 a y w Wm M m N Dec. 17, 1963 w. L. MULLEN 3,114,361

SPRING TENSION DEVICE Filed 001;. 24. 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIE. 9

70 IE IE m INVENTOR.

70c 70b M1504 L M044 n! rney United States Patent ()fiiice 3,ll4,3iil Patented Dec. 17, 1963 3,114,361 SPRliNG TENSION DEVECE Wilbur L. Muilen, 1%7 S. Dianne Ave, Evansviile, Ind. Filed (Pet. 24, 1961, Ser. No. 147,313 11 Claims. (Cl. 123188) The present invention relates to a spring tension device, and more particularly to a new and novel spring tension device which is adapted for use with a valve spring in an internal combustion engine.

As is known, the continued use of an internal combustion engine changes the desired operative balance between the chain of components thereof including the cam shaft, the hydraulic litter, the rocker arm and the valve, resulting in poor engine performance. The aforesaid change in balance is occasioned by the valve spring becoming weakened, where, previously, in order to re-establish the desired performance, a complicated disassembly procedure was necessary, sometimes to the point of replacing the valve spring. The preceding'represented a considerable time, as well as money, expenditure.

By virtue of the instant invention, the applicant herein has invented a new and novel spring tension device for use in conjunction with the valve spring of an internal combustion engine. In its several forms, the instant spring tension device is simply and conveniently positioned for use, in either an old or a new engine, and is readily manufactured, all being features providing a minimum expenditure for the user. More specifically, the instant invention is defined by a member which, when in use, is positionedso as to either engage the valve spring or the oil deflector of a typical valve assembly for an internal combustion engine, and where means are provided to retain, or otherwise lock, the member in such position of use.

Accordingly, the principal object of the present invention is to provide a new and novel spring tension device for a valve of an internal combustion engine.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and novel spring tension device for a valve of an internal combustion engine which may be readily used on either an old or a new engine.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a new and novel spring tension device for a valve of an internal combustion engine which is conventionally positioned for use with a minimum disassembly of the internal combustion engine.

A still further and more general object of the present invention is to provide a new and novel spring tension device for a valve spring of an internal combustion engine which is readily manufactured and which represents a 1 minimum cost to the user.

Other objects and a better understanding of the instant FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic view, partly fragmentary,

and partly in vertical cross section, showing a typical valve assembly of an internal combustion engine;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of a spring tension device made in accordance with the instant invention;

FIG. 3 is another view of the spring tension device of FIG. 2, being in vertical section, and taken at line 3-3 of FIG. 2 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

MG. 4 is a top plan View of another spring tension device in accordance with the instant invention;

FIG. 5 is a view in vertical section of the spring tension device of FIG. 4 positioned for use, taken at line 5-5 of FIG. 4 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 6 is a top plan view, in closed position, of another spring tension device in accordance with the instant invention;

FIG. 7 is a view in vertical section of the spring tension device of FIG. 6, taken at line 7-7 of FIG. 6 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 8 is another top plan view of the spring tension device of FIG. 6, in this instance, however, showing same in an opened position;

FIG. 9 is a top plan view of another spring tension device in accordance with the instant invention;

FIG. 10 is a view in vertical section of the spring tension device of FIG. 9, taken at linelii1il of FIG. 9 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 11 is another spring tension device in accordance with the instant invention;

FIG. 12 is a detailed view of one of the cooperating portions of the spring tension device of FIG. 11, taken at line l212 of FIG. 11 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 13 is a view in vertical section of the spring tension device of FIG. 9 positioned for use, taken at line 1313 of FIG. 9 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 14 is a top plan view of one of the two cooperating portions of the spring tension device of FIG. 9; while,

FIG. 15 is a top plan view of the other of the two cooperating portions of the spring tension device of FIG. 9.

For the purposes of promoting an understanding of the principles of the invention, reference will now be made to the embodiments illustrated in the drawings and specific language will be used to describe the same. It will nevertheless be understood that no limitation of the scope of the invention is thereby intended, such alterations and further modifications in the illustrated devices, and such further applications of the principles of the invention as illustrated therein being contemplated as would normally occur to one skilled in the art to which the invention relates.

Referring now to FIG; 1, the applicants new and novel spring. tension device 10 is used in conjunction with a commonly known overhead valve assembly of an internal combustion engine, the latter as typically found in an automobile. In any event, the components defining the aforesaid assembly broadly include a valve head 14 having a stud 15 positioned thereon which receives a rocker arm assembly 16, the latter being defined by a rocker arm 16a, a rocker arm pivot ball 16b,-and a nut 160. One portion of the rocker arm 16a is engaged by a push rod 18, the latter connecting to a hydraulic lifter and cam shaft (neither of which are shown in the drawings).

Another portion of the rocker arm 16a is engaged by the stem of a valve 20, where such extends through an opening 14a in the valve head 14. A valve spring 22 encircles the valve 20 and its bottom end is seated in a recessed portion 14b in the valve head 14, with an oil deflector 24 typically being positioned on its top end.

A typical overhead valve assembly further includes a two-part valve keeper 23, a cap 21 which retains the valve keeper 23 in position through the tension of the valve spring 22, and rubber gasket 25 for positioning the valve keeper 23, as well as for sealing purposes. The assembly is typically closed by a cover 26 made from metal or like material.

In any event, when the force of the valve spring 22 becomes lessened because of the usage of the internal combustion engine, an unbalance results between the push rod 13, the hydraulic lifter and the cam shaft, on one end of the rocker arm assembly 16, and the valve 2% on the other end thereof. The applicants new and novel invention forsees the restoration of balance by the use of a spring tension device, of the types to be described herebelow, which is typically inserted between the valve spring 22, or the oil deflector 24, if the latter is used, and the cap 21.

With reference to FIGS. 2 and 3, a typical spring tension device 30 in accordance with the instant invention comprises cooperable components 30a and 3017, which, when assembled, define an opening, having a downwardly flared rim. The latter permits the ready positioning and retaining of the spring tension device 30 either on the valve 22 or on the oil deflector 24 (see FIG. 1). In any event, use of the spring tension device 30 provides the desired balance for good engine performance.

FIGS. 4 and 5 disclose another form of the instant invention, in this instance an embodiment having particular adapt-ability for use on new internal combustion engines. In this regard, the spring tension device 40 of FIGS. 4 and 5 comprises a threaded base 49a having a flange 40b at one end thereof. A cooperating member 400 is adapted to move along the threaded base 40a, thereby permitting the regulation of the spacing between such components and, hence, the tension on the valve spring 22.

In this form of the invention, the movable cooperating member 400 of the spring tension device 40 can be selflocking" at any desired tension position or, for example, may be locked through a twisted wire arrangement (not shown) extending from flange 40b of the threaded base 40a to the cooperating member 400. Additionally, it may also be desirable to have the desired positioning maintained by a torsion spring (not shown) having ends which respectively extend into the aforesaid flange 40b and the cooperating member 40c. Similarly, a cotter pin (not shown) may also be used for the same purposes.

With reference to FIGS. 6, 7 and 8, another spring tension device 50 is disclosed therein comprising arcuate portions 50a and 56b, hinged together at Site. The ends of the arcuate portions Stla and 50b each have roughened surfaces, at 50d (see FIG. 7), so that when these arcuate portions 50a and 5% are rotated to a closed position, upon positioning for use, locking thereof is effected. Instead of frictional engagement, it should be apparent that a detent may be formed in each of the ends of the arcuate portions 50a and 5%, and, further, that gripping arms may extend from such ends in a manner similar to those arms adjacent the hinge 50c.

A preferred form of spring tension device 60 is disclosed in FIGS. 9, 10, 13, 14 and 15, where such spring tension device is defined by symmetrical parts 60a and 60b, each having oppositely disposed, in consecutive order, upstanding tabs 660 formed thereon. Corresponding detent type locking arrangements 60d are provided at the ends of each of the parts 60a and 601) where, in assembly, and in the instance where an oil deflector 24 is employed, the parts 60a and 60b defining the spring tension device 69 are fitted between such oil deflector 24 and the cap 21 (see FIG. 13). It should be apparent that the upstanding tabs 60c serve to position the spring tension device 60 with reference to the oil deflector 24 and to the cap 21. Moreover, it should be apparent that the parts 60a and 60b of the spring tension device 60 may be retained in assembled relationship through the alternative use of lanced burrs or other types of projections.

With reference now to FIGS. 11 and 12, still another modified spring tension device 7 0 is shown therein, in this instance being defined by portions 70a and 76b, each having a step-like configuration 700 in side view, and where each are movable one with reference to the other. The modification of FIGS. 11 and 12 is particularly adaptable for new internal combustion engines but, in any event, it assumes the same position discussed hereabove, i.e. between the valve spring 22 and the cap 21, or the oil deflector 24, if the latter is employed. It should be apparent that by the choice of different steps, the portions 70a and 70b may assume different spacings with reference to each other and, thereby, provide a range of spring tension adjustments.

In any event, and from the preceding, it should be apparent that the applicant herein has provided a new and novel spring tension device for use in conjunction with the valve spring in an internal combustion engine. The invention, in its several forms, is characterized by simplicity, in that instead of a complicated disassembled procedure previously relied upon, the instant spring tension devices are readily positioned for use, as Well as positively retained for such use. It should be further apparent that the instant spring tension device provides the necessary balance for effective engine performance, and that at least two of the types of spring tensioning devices disclosed herein are susceptible for use in connection with new internal combustion engines, i.e. each have more adaptability for such use in that the valve cap, and other allied assembly, must be removed to effect the initial positioning thereof. As to subsequent use, however, each represents a variety of spacings to achieve a the ultimate purposes of the invention.

Moreover, the spring tension devices described here- 1 above are susceptible to various changes within the spirit of the invention. As indicated herein, various locking arrangements may be employed and additionally, the dimensioning as 'well as proportioning thereof may be varied. In this latter regard, and by way of background information, a range of thicknesses in the order of ,4, to 7 of an inch may be typically employed for the effec- 1 tive practice of the invention. Thus, the preceding discussion should be considered illustrative, and not as limiting the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. In an internal combustion engine having a valve stem, a valve keeper, a valve cap and a valve spring, a spring tension device disposed around said valve stem and between said valve spring and said valve cap comprising a first and a second curved member each having end portions, and locking means disposed on said end portions retaining said first and said second curved members in assembled relationship.

2. In an internal combustion engine having a valve stem, a valve keeper, a valve cap, a valve spring, and an oil deflector disposed on said valve spring, a spring tension device disposed around said valve stem and between said oil-deflector and said valve cap comprising a first and a second curved member each having end portions, and locking means disposed on said end portions retaining said first and said second curved members in assembled relationship.

3. In an internal combustion engine having a valve stem, a valve cap, a valve keeper and a valve spring, a spring tension device disposed around said valve stem and engaging said valve cap through a force exerted by said valve spring, said spring tension device comprising a first and a second curved member each having end portions, and locking means disposed on said end portions retaining said first and said second curved members in assembled relationship.

4. The structure of claim 3 where said curved members each have oppositely disposed flanges thereon defining positioning means.

5. The structure of claim 3 where said locking means on said end portions are co-operating detents.

6. In an internal combustion engine having a valve stem, a valve cap, a valve keeper and a valve spring, a spring tension device disposed around said valve stem and engaging said valve cap through a force exerted by said valve spring, said spring tension device comprising a first and a second curved member hinged together at one portion thereof, and means locking together other portions of said first and said second curved members.

7. The structure of claim 6 where said other portions of said first and said second curved members are locked together through frictional means.

8. In an internal combustion engine having a valve stem, a valve cap, a valve keeper and a valve spring, a spring tension device disposed around said valve stem and engaging said valve cap through a force exerted by vaive spring, said spring tension device comprising a first member having a threaded body portion, and a second member movabie along said threaded body portion of said first member.

9. The structure of claim 8 where means are provided to retain said first member and said second member at any desired preselected position with respect to each other.

10. in an internal combustion engine having a valve stem, 21 vaive cap, a valve keeper and a valve spring, a spring tension device disposed around said valve stern and engaging said valve cap through a force exerted by said valve spring, said spring tension device comprising a first member and a second member, each of said first and said second members having step-like projections thereon, whereby said first member and said second member can be selectively positioned one With respect to each other.

11. In an internal combustion engine having a valve stem, a vaive ap, a valve keeper and a vaive spring, a spring tension device disposed around said valve stem and engaging said valve cap through a force exerted by said valve spring, said spring tension device comprising a first member and a second member, where said second member is movable along the body of said first member.

References tCited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1640118 *Apr 22, 1926Aug 23, 1927Henry FordValve mechanism for internal-combustion engines
US1711267 *Sep 30, 1926Apr 30, 1929Hutt Albert EValve-stem oil guard
US2124702 *Apr 17, 1937Jul 26, 1938Continental Motors CorpEngine
US2697599 *Apr 24, 1952Dec 21, 1954Hammel Dahl CompanyValve operating mechanism
US2817326 *Feb 16, 1956Dec 24, 1957Studebaker Packard CorpTappet spacer retainer
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US2899954 *Jul 12, 1956Aug 18, 1959 Daniel
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3430657 *Dec 15, 1966Mar 4, 1969Caterpillar Tractor CoBalancing of gravitational forces in a vertically disposed valve spool
US4262640 *Apr 19, 1978Apr 21, 1981Eaton CorporationSpring retainer-valve selector
US4356799 *Oct 14, 1980Nov 2, 1982Eaton CorporationSpring retainer-valve selector
US4538563 *Sep 4, 1984Sep 3, 1985Peterson American CorporationHelical coil spring damper assemblies
US4602598 *Jul 15, 1985Jul 29, 1986Locke MooreSpring and valve skirt
US6119645 *Feb 16, 1999Sep 19, 2000Dana CorporationValve stem seal with non-rotatable retainer
EP1063391A2 *Jun 20, 2000Dec 27, 2000TRW Deutschland GmbHValve drive for an internal combustion engine
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/188.1, 123/90.37, 123/188.6, 267/174
International ClassificationF01L3/10
Cooperative ClassificationF01L3/10
European ClassificationF01L3/10