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Publication numberUS3114551 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 17, 1963
Filing dateJul 17, 1962
Priority dateJul 17, 1962
Publication numberUS 3114551 A, US 3114551A, US-A-3114551, US3114551 A, US3114551A
InventorsMorris Ovitz
Original AssigneeMorris Ovitz
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Geographic game with a movable transparent sheet having paths thereon and overlying a map
US 3114551 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 17, 1963 M. OVlTZ 3,114,551

GEOGRAPHIC GAME WITH A MOVABLE TRANSPARENT SHEET HAVING PATHS THEREON AND OVERLYING A MAP Filed July 1'7, 1962 3 Sheets-Sheet l UND :THE: WORLD ifivENToR. MORRIS OVITZ ATTOPAQ'V Dec. 17, 1963 M. OVlTZ 3,114,551

GEOGRAPHIC GAME WITH A MOVABLE TRANSPARENT SHEET HAVING PATHS THEREON AND OVERLYING A MAP Filed July 17, 1962 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 MORRIS OVITZ Dec. 17, 1963 lTz 3,114,551 GEOGRAPHIC GAME WITH A MOVABLE TRANSPARENT sHEET HAVING PATHS THEREoN AND OVERLYING A MAP Filed July 17, 1962 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 WEATHER WEATHER SNOW V WEATHER 7 WEATHER O o STORM RAIN WIN R o CARS g EVERY/"E V PLA STAY 55, JVE Y so BACK PLANES STAY BOATS STAY GO B PLANES GO 8 BoA'rs so OATS STAY CARS GO INVENTOR. 64 MORRIS OVITZ ATTOP/Viy United States Patent Ofitice 3,114,551 Patented Dec. 17, 1963 3,114,551 GEOGRAlHlC GAME WTTH A MOVABLE TRANS- PARENT SHEET HAVING PATHd THEREON AND OVERLYING A lvlAP Morris Ovitz', 3ll-32 74th St, East Elmhurst 70, Nit. Filed July 17, 1962,, Star. No. 219,509 8 Claims. (Cl. 273-134) This invention relates to a geographical game.

According to the invention there is provided a game including a board on which is an outline map of the world. On the map is a plurality of tracks defining itineraries which the players follow in going around the world. Playing pieces represent vehicles chosen by the players. A spinner or pointer and dial are provided on the board by means of which the players determine the distances they travel on their trips around the world at each part of their journey. Obstacles are encountered during travel which subject the players to penalties and delays. In a modified form of the invention, the itineraries are outlined on a movable overlay sheet over the map board so that the itineraries can be changed at will.

It is a principal object of the invention to provide a geographical game including a map of the world and itineraries which players follow. 7

It is a further object to provide a geographical game which is both educational and amusing since players gain knowledge of geographical features of the world, modes of travel, itineraries, etc., While engaging in competitive play, involving risk, chance and obstacles to heighten interest and entertainment value of the game.

Another object is to provide a geographical game as described wh rein the itineraries traveled by the players are variable at will.

For further comprehension of the invention, and of the objects and advantages thereor", reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings, and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth.

In the accompanying drawings forming a material part of this disclosure:

FIG. 1 is an oblique top view of a game embodying the invention.

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of another form of the game.

FlGS. 3, 4 and 5 are sectional views taken on lines 3-3, and 5-5, respectively, of FIG. 2.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a game piece.

FIG. 7 is an oblique top view of a plurality of game cards.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of an i inerary overlay sheet employed in the game of FIG. 2.

Referring first to FIG. 1, the game it? is shown in its simplest form. The game includes a rectangular board made of still cardboard or plastic material. On the upper surface of the board is an outline map M in mercator projection of the world, in which map land areas T2 are colored in colors such as green or brown, and water areas id such as oceans, seas, lakes ant. the like are colored blue or other color contrasting with the color of the land areas. If desired, the land and water areas can be identified by appropriate indicia T5 to increase the educational value and interest of the game.

Marked on the game board are a plurality of paths or tracks T respectively designated TV. The several tracks start at the left edge T17 of the board and extend across the board in a winding path to the right edge 19. Each track starts at a different geographical latitude and ends at the next lower latitude marked with legends 31. Thus track 1 starts at latitude One and ends at latitude Two. Track II starts at latitude Two and ends at latitude Three, etc. Track V ends at latitude One. The several tracks cross each other at different points. Thus, track 1 goes over tracks II, III, V at points A, B, and C and D, and under track II at point E. The several tracks cross both land areas 12 and water areas 14. Each track is divided into a series of divisions 2s.

A plurality of playing pieces 16 in the form of small disks marked with different numerals 18 are provided for the several players. A circular dial 2b is located near the lower left corner of the board. This dial has an annular ring divided into a number of divisions, the spaces of which are marked with different numerals 22. A freely rotatable pointer 24- is mounted on shaft or pin 27 located at the center of the dial.

Two or more players may play the game as follows: Each player in turn spins the pointer 24. The player who spins to the highest digit or number on the dial becomes the first player and is assigned the playing piece 16 marked 1. The player spinning to the next highest digit is assigned the piece marked 2. etc. If two players spin to the same digit, the two spin again until one player spins to a different and higher digit from the other to determine the order of play. Each player then places his playing piece 16 at the left end of a track corresponding to the number on his piece. Thus the player with piece marked 1 will have track l, etc. Suppose there are five players. Each player will place his piece 16 on the track space marked Start." Then play starts. Each player in turn from the uppermost latitude One to the lowermost latitude Five spins pointer 24. The numeral on dial it to which the player spins determines the number of divisions the player moves his piece. it a player in moving his piece along his track encounters a boundary of a land area or water area While moving along a water or land area, respectively, this constitutes an obstacle. player is penalized by halting his travel at the boundary even though he has not completed the number of steps called for by the digit indicated by the pointer on scale 249. Then the next player spins the pointer.

The delayed player can continue his journey when his turn next comes around. A player whose track crosses over that of another player proceeds undelayed. But a player whose track crosses under that of another player encounters an obstacle when his piece encounters the track of the other player. The obstacle serves to delay the player who travels the lower track and he stops his travel even though he has not yet advanced the full number of divisions called for by the pointer on dial 2d. The player can continue his travel the next time his turn comes around. As an example, player 1 will proceed along track I without interruption at points A-D where track I crosses over other tracks, but will be delayed at point E where track I crosses under track II. As an example of an obstacle encountered at a land boundary, the player moving over the Pacific Ocean on track Ill encounters the boundary 3% of the United States. This constitutes an obstacle and the player is halted. If the player completes the count of steps at a land or water boundary, this counts as a greater obstacle, and the player misses his next turn to spin the pointer 24 when his next turn comes around. A player who completes the count of steps he moves along his track at another track which crosses his track also encounters a greater obstacle and misses his next turn at the dial 20.

The player whose piece 16 first reaches the end of his track or itinerary at the right edge of the board wins the game. If a longer game is to be played, it may be decided in advance that the complete game shall require a certain number, for example, three trips around the world. The players will find as each completes a trip around the world from the left to right edges of the game that he is at a next lower latitude. Then as instruction 32 states, the player proceeds to the left edge of the board and starts traveling the next track. The player on track V starts his next trip on track I as stated by instruction 32. The player who first completes the required number of trips around the world wins the game. As each player completes each trip around the world he is rewarded by having two spins at dial Ztl. He will advance his piece at the start of the next track the total number of the two successive digits spun at the dial. In addition, he may disregard all obstacles such as boundaries of land or water and crossing under of other tracks while he advances the entire number of steps of the two spins at the dial. However, if his piece stops at an obstacle when completing the entire count, this constitutes a new major obstacle and he loses his next turn to spin.

There is thus a great element of chance and risk that a player will encounter numerous obstacles, and also a chance that he will be rewarded by completing trips and by avoiding some obstacles.

In FIGS. 2-8 is shown another form of the invention. Game board w is a flat rectangular member secured to straight rectangular partitions 40, 42 at its opposed edges. The planes of the partitions are perpendicular to the plane of the board. Partitions 4t), 42 define inner walls of boxes 45, 46. The bottoms 48, 50 of the boxes extend below the plane of the board and support it in an elevated position. The boxes also reinforce the partitions. Outer side walls 52, 54 and end walls 56, 57, complete the two boxes. At ends of the partitions are formed slots 69 which receive ends of shafts or rollers 62, 64. A transparent flexible plastic sheet 66 has opposite ends 66, 66 wound on the two rollers. Knobs 69 at the ends of the rollers can be grasped manually rolling the sheet up on one roller and unrolling the sheet from the other roller. The sheet is guided between the partitions 4t), 42.

On the sheet 66, as clearly shown in FIGS. 2 and 8, are marked winding tracks or paths T. The particular tracks shown in FIG. 2 are designated VI-X and the tracks shown in FIG. 8 are designated XVXX. The two rollers and sheet 66 define a scroll 76 which can be laid down over the game board upon which a map M of the world is marked in conventional mercator projection similar to that shown in FIG. 1. The rollers can be adjusted so that any desired set of tracks T will be aligned with the several latitude indicia 31.

The left box 45 has a plurality of different playing pieces 15 16 16 having respectively the forms of boats, automobiles and airplanes or other vehicles, indicating different forms of transportation. A die 63 used in the game is shown in FIG. 6 and marked on its several sides with legends 61 designating the several forms of vehicles which a player-traveler may use in playing the game. A dial 211* is located in the bottom of box 46. Dial 21 has an annular ring divided into a number of divisions, the spaces of which are marked with different modes of transportation indicated at 22 such as ship, car, plane. A freely rotatable pointer 25 is mounted on shaft or pin 2.5 located at the center of the dial. A stack 65 of cards 67 is provided in box 46. These cards, some of which are shown best in FIG. 7, are Weather cards and indicate weather conditions under which the player travels. Hazards, penalties, playing instructions and rewards are indicated on the cards 67 by indicia 55.

A score pad 68 is located in the box 46 for scoring play. Dial 26* is located in the bottom of box 46. The dial has pointer 24 which is freely turnable on pin 27 to point to any of the numerals 22 on the dial.

The play of the game of FIGS. 2-8 is similar to that previously described with several minor variations. After the players determine the order of play by use of dial the players in turn may either throw the die 63 or spin the pointer of dial 21 in order to select the type of vehicle the player will employ, whether boat, plane or car.

As each players turn comes to spin the pointer 24 he notes the legend on the uppermost card 67 of the stack. The card may indicate that everyone goes back two steps as indicated on card 67A or goes back one step as indicatcd on card 67C. Since this type of penalty affects all players this introduces another element of risk, chance and hazard and keeps up the interest of players whose turn has not come to spin the pointer. Some cards such as 673, 67D and 67E indicate selective obstacles. For example, players having pieces representing cars would spin the pointer when their turn came if card 671) were uppermost. But players having planes or boats would miss their turn because the weather would introduce an obstacle to those vehicles. The score pad 68 could be used to record the number of spins required by a player to complete his trip around the world from left to right edge of the game board. The player who traveled around the World in a minimum number of spins could be declared winner.

It the complete game involves more than one trip around the world each player would continue on the next track starting on the same latitude where the previous track terminated. Sheet 66 is arranged so that all tracks cross over or under other tracks with the rewards for crossing over and penalties for crossing under other tracks as explained above. To increase interest in the game, the players can advance the sheet 66 in any direction toward either end of the game board so that each track will cover a different itinerary over the map of the world on the game board. The change in itinerary can be made between games or even during the course of a game. This will change the hazards and obstacles as the tracks will cross land and water boundaries differently as the tracks are located in different positions.

After each player finishes play or misses his turn due to some hazard or obstacle, the top card 67 on stack 65 is turned under to expose the next weather card.

While the game can be played quite satisfactorily in the simple form of FIG. 1, the more elaborate form of the game of FIGS. 2-8 may be preferred where it is desired to keep changing the itineraries so that no two itineraries are ever the same for any player. Also, more hazards are involved due to the weather cards and special forms of the vehicles assigned to the players by chance.

The map M can be made up in various colors in an attractive manner.

The game will appeal to players of all ages and will simultaneously instruct them in geography while amusing and entertaining. If desired, maps of smaller geographic areas than the entire world, such as continents, or even individual countries or states, may be employed without changing the basic character of the game.

While I have illustrated and described the preferred embodiments of my invention, it is to be understood that I do not limit myself to the precise constructions herein disclosed and that various changes and modifications may be made within the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new, and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent 1. A geographic game comprising a rectangular game board, said board having a map thereon including differently colored land and water areas with outlines of boundaries of said areas shown on the map, a transparent plastic sheet movable over opposite ends of the board, said sheet being longer than the board and substantially as wide as the board, a plurality of winding tracks on said sheet extending from one edge of the sheet across the width thereof to the other edge, said map being visible through the transparent sheet with said tracks overlaying and extending across the map, each of the tracks having a continuous series of divisions, playing pieces for traveling along the tracks, and a dial having a rotatable pointer and an annular ring of numerals thereon indicating the number of divisions any one of said pieces is to advance along any one of said tracks when the pointer points to one of said numerals.

2. A geographic game comprising a rectangular game board, said board having a map thereon including differently colored land and water areas with outlines of boundaries of said areas shown on the map, a transparent plastic sheet movable over opposite ends of the board, said sheet being longer than the board and substantially as wide as the board, a plurality of winding tracks on said sheet extending from one edge of the sheet across the width thereof to the other edge, said map being visible through the transparent sheet with said tracks overlaying and extending across the map, each of the tracks having a continuous series of divisions, playing pieces for traveling along the tracks, and a dial having a rotatable pointer and an annular ring of nurnerals thereon indicating the number of divisions any one of said pieces is to advance along any one of said tracks when the pointer points to one of said numerals, each of the tracks crossing at least one of the other tracks, the intersection of one track with another constituting a temporary obstacle to play of a player following one of the intersecting tracks.

3. A geographic game comprising a rectangular game board, said board having a map thereon including differently colored land and water areas with outlines of boundaries of said areas shown on the map, a transparent plastic sheet movable over opposite ends of the board, said sheet being longer than the board and substantially as wide as the board, a plurality of winding tracks on said sheet extending from one edge of the sheet across the width thereof to the other edge, said map being visible through the transparent sheet with said tracks overlaying and extending across the map, each of the tracks having a continuous series of divisions, playing pieces for traveling along the tracks, and a dial having a rotatable pointer and an annular ring of numerals thereon indicating the number of divisions any one of said pieces is to advance along any one of said tracks when the pointer points to one of said numerals, each of the tracks crossing at least one of the other tracks, the intersection of one track with another constituting a temporary obstacle to play of a player following one of the intersecting tracks, a pair or" upstanding partitions at opposite edges of the board for guiding the sheet in movement over the board, a pair of rollers, opposite ends of the sheet being engaged on said rollers, and means on said partitions for rotatably supporting the rollers to advance the sheet over the board.

4. A geographic game comprising a rectangular game board, said board having a map thereon including differently colored land and water areas with outlines of boundaries of said areas shown on the map, a transparent plastic sheet movable over opposite ends of the board, said sheet being longer than the board and substantially as wide as the board, a plurality of winding tracks on said sheet extending from one edge of the sheet across the width thereof to the other edge, said map being visible through the transparent sheet with said tracks overlaying and extending across the map, each of the tracks having a continuous series of divisions, and a pair of upstanding partitions at opposite edges of the board for guiding the sheet in movement over the board, a pair of rollers, opposite ends of the sheet being engaged on said rollers, and means on said partitions for rotatably supporting the rollers to advance the sheet over the board.

5. A geographic game comprising a rectangular game board, said board having a map thereon including diflerently colored land and Water areas with outlines of boundaries of said areas shown on the map, a transparent plastic sheet movable over opposite ends of the board, said sheet being longer than the board and substantially as wide as the board, a plurality of winding tracks on said sheet extending from one edge of the sheet across the width thereof to the other edge, said map being visible through the transparent sheet with said tracks overlaying and extending across the map, each of the tracks having a continuous series of divisions, and a pair of upstanding partitions at opposite edges of the board for guiding the sheet in movement over the board, a pair of rollers, op-

posite ends of the sheet being engaged on said rollers, means on said partitions for rotatably supporting the rollers to advance the sheet over the board, playing pieces in forms representing diiferent types of vehicles, and a dial having a rotatable pointer and an annular ring of numerals thereon indicating the number of divisions any one of said pieces is to advance along any one of said tracks when the pointer points to one of said numerals.

6. A geographic game comprising a rectangular game board, said board having a map thereon including ditferently colored land and water areas with outlines of boundaries of said areas shown on the map, a transparent plastic sheet movable over opposite ends of the board, said sheet being longer than the board and substantially as wide as the board, a plurality of winding tracks on said sheet extending from one edge of the sheet across the width thereof to the other edge, said map being visible through the transparent sheet with said track overlaying and extending across the map, each of the tracks having a continuous series of divisions, playing pieces for traveling along the tracks, and a dial having a rotatable pointer and an annular ring of numerals thereon indicating the number of divisions any one of said pieces is to advance along any one of said tracks when the pointer points to one of said numerals, each of the tracks crossing at least one of the other tracks, the intersection of one track with another constituting a temporary obstacle to play of a player following one of the intersecting tracks, a pair of upstanding partitions at opposite edges of the board for guiding the sheet in movement over the board, a pair of rollers, opposite ends of the sheet being engaged on said rollers, means on said partitions for rotatably supporting the rollers to advance the sheet over the board, said playing pieces having forms representing different vehicles, boxes secured to outer sides of the partitions for supporting the board in an elevated position and for reinforcing the partitions, and a die having legends for assigning particular pieces to the players for use in play.

7. A geographic game comprising a rectangular game board, said board having a map thereon including diiferently colored land and water areas with outlines of boundaries of said areas shown on the map, a transparent plastic sheet movable over opposite ends of the board, said sheet being longer than the board and substantially as Wide as the board, a plurality of winding tracks on said sheet extending from one edge of the sheet across the width thereof to the other edge, said map being visible through the transparent sheet with said tracks overlaying and extending across the map, each of the tracks having a continuous series of divisions, playing pieces for traveling along the tracks, and a dial having a rotatable pointer and an annular ring of numerals thereon indicating the number of divisions any one of said pieces is to advance along any one of said tracks when the pointer points to one of said numerals, each of the tracks crossing at least one of the other tracks, the intersection of one track with another constituting a temporary obstacle to play of a player following one of the intersecting tracks, a pair of upstanding partitions at opposite edges of the board for guiding the sheet in movement over the board, a pair of rollers, opposite ends of the sheet being engaged on said rollers, means on said partitions for rotatably supporting the rollers to advance the sheet over the board, said playing pieces having forms representing different vehicles, boxes secured to outer sides of the partitions for supporting the board in an elevated position and for reinforcing the partitions, a die having legends for assigning particular pieces to the players for use in play, said dial and pointer being mounted in one of the boxes, and a plurality of cars indicating different weather conditions encountered by playing pieces and determining play of the game.

8. A geographic game comprising a rectangular game board, said board having a map thereon including differently colored land and water areas with outlines of boundaries of said areas shown on the map, a transparent plastic sheet movable over opposite ends of the board, said sheet being longer than the board and substantially as Wide as the board, a plurality of winding tracks on said sheet extending from one edge of the sheet across the Width thereof to the other edge, said map being visible through the transparent sheet with said tracks overlaying and extending across the map, each of the tracks having a continuous series of divisions, and a pair of upstanding partitions at opposite edges of the board for guiding the sheet in movement over the board, a pair of rollers, opposite ends of the sheet being engaged on said rollers, means on said partitions for rotatably supporting the rollers to advance the sheet over the board, playing pieces in forms representing different types of vehicles, and a References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 952,997 Sanderson Mar. 22, 1910 1,652,851 Bendtin Dec. 13, 1927 2,780,463 Salomon Feb. 5, 1957

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US952997 *Nov 12, 1908Mar 22, 1910New Idea Game CompanyEducational game apparatus.
US1652851 *Oct 26, 1925Dec 13, 1927August F SauerGame
US2780463 *May 26, 1954Feb 5, 1957Salomon IrvingChance controlled game apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3572718 *Dec 4, 1967Mar 30, 1971Robert L MooreBoard game apparatus
US3658337 *May 22, 1969Apr 25, 1972James E WilliamsBoard game apparatus
US3773326 *Aug 18, 1971Nov 20, 1973E ThieleBoard game apparatus
US3949991 *Feb 7, 1974Apr 13, 1976Michael Dennis ChaseBoard game apparatus
US4061336 *May 14, 1976Dec 6, 1977Lincoln Launa JGeographic board game
US4093235 *Jul 29, 1976Jun 6, 1978Publishers Planning Inc.Tourist game
US5048839 *Apr 2, 1990Sep 17, 1991Hurst Mark PMediated strategy game
US5588654 *Feb 9, 1995Dec 31, 1996Third Quarter CorporationGame playing apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/252, 273/287, 273/284
International ClassificationA63F3/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/0434
European ClassificationA63F3/04G