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Publication numberUS3117798 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 14, 1964
Filing dateMar 13, 1961
Priority dateMar 13, 1961
Publication numberUS 3117798 A, US 3117798A, US-A-3117798, US3117798 A, US3117798A
InventorsYoung Jack E
Original AssigneeYoung Jack E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Helicopter simulating means for tricycles
US 3117798 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

MF r Jan. 14, 1964 YOUNG 3,117,798

HELICOPTER SIMULATING MEANS FOR TRICYCLES Filed March 15, 1961 3 Sheets-Sheet l JNVENTOR. IG- 2- ./A :K E- you/vs ,4 TTORIVEY Jan. 14, 1964 J. E. YOUNG 3,117,798

HELICOPTER SIMULATING MEANS FOR TRICYCLES Filed March 15, 1961 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. FIG 5 JACK E. YOUNG ATTORNEY Jan. 14, 1964 J. E. YOUNG 3,117,798

HELICOPTER SIMULATING MEANS FOR TRICYCLES Filed March 13, 1961 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 25 I ",I': r240: 3 L 5 E 210 g 26 INVENTOR. /-'/6. 9. JACK 5. YOU/VG ATT RIVEY ddllfidd Patented Jan. 14%, 1954 fine ime

3,137,798 nnricorrnn snapper-run. MEANS Fora 'rnrcycras Zack E. Young, Kirkland, Wash. {88 Bernardo Ave Sunnyvale, tlalif.) Filled Mar. 13, 1961, Ser. No. 95,317

4 Claims. (@l. fill-1.12)

This invention relates to tricycles, and more particularly to means that can be either removably or permanently attached to tricycles so as to effect a toy vehicle that simulates a helicopter.

in the present day space age a childs mind is drawn to the art of flying. If a child has a tricycle this gives him a s e of movement when he operates it, but it does not give him a sense of flying. Nor does the provision of an airplane simulating body on the tricycle give the child a true sense of flying, even though the airplane simulating body is complex and expensive. In other words, it is still a feeling of being in a ground vehicle. On the other hand, if a rotatable propeller were to be disposed overhead the child and he were to be partially enclosed this would give a feeling that one were actually operating an air vehicle.

-erefore, an object of this invention is to provide means which can be so associated with a tricycle that the vehicle simulates a helicopter.

Another object of this invention is to provide an accessory attachment for converting a tricycle to a toy vehicle that simulates a helicopter.

An additional object of this invention is to accomplish the aforementioned objects by means of an attractive simple inexpensive structure which extends overhead the child and thus partially encloses the child.

A further object of this invention is to provide for minimizing the weight and wind resistance of the toy vehicle that simulates a helicopter.

Still another object of this invention is to provide an accessory attachment for a tricycle which can be made compact and thus easily stored.

Other objects of this invention will become apparent when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one embodiment of this invention in which a generally U-shaped frame and associated components is provided to effect a toy vehicle which simulates a helicopter.

PEG. 2 is a left hand side elevation View of the toy vehicle illustrated in PEG. 1

Flu. 3 is an enlarged view of the helicopter noise simulating means associated with the lift propellor shown in FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 4 is a perspective View of another embodiment of this invention in which a greater amount of enclosure is provided for the child.

FIG. 5 is a left hand side elevation view of the toy vehicle illustrated in PEG. 4;

FIGS. 6 and 7 are enlarged views of the means, as

hown in FlGS. 4 and 5, for effecting a rotation of the irt and control propellers.

PEG. 8 is a perspective View of another embodiment of invention in which the accessory attachment for converting the tricycle to a toy vehicle simulating a helicopter is mounted to the handlebar of the tricycle, and

PEG. 9 is a left hand side elevation of the accessory attachment shown in PEG. 8 as well as a left hand side elevation of the tricycle that is associated therewith.

Referring to FIGS. 1 through 3 there is shown a toy vehicle it} which illustrates one embodiment of the teachings of this invention. The toy vehicle it? includes a conventional tricycle 12. having a rear axle 14 which has mounted thereon for rotation two rear wheels 16 and 1".

The frame of the tricycle comprises a U-shaped rear cross frame brace 2d which is carried by the rear axle 14, a curved longitudinal frame bar 22 which extends between a head 24 and the middle of the rear cross frame brace 26. A front wheel 26, which has interconnected therewith pedal forks 2t; and pedals 343, is mounted in a front wheel fork 32. In order to turn the front wheel 26, a handlebar 34 is interconnected with the front wheel fork 32. The tricycle 12 also includes a tricycle seat 35 which is mounted to the longitudinal frame bar 22 and a step 38 which is carried by the rear axle 14.

In accordance with the teachings of this invention the toy vehicle it) also includes an accessory attachment 4% which when combined with the tricycle 12 simulates a helicopter. In general, the accessory attachment 46 includes a generally U-shaped frame 42, which includes two downwardly extending legs 44 and 46 and an interconnecting portion 48 disposed between the two legs 44 and 46; a lift propeller 50 mounted to the interconnecting portion 48 at a position overhead a child 54 and disposed to rotate in a substantially horizontal plane; a generally triangular-shaped tail member 56, having a forward portion 53 and an aft portion 69, the forward portion 58 being mounted to the downwardly extending leg 56, of the generally U-shaped frame 42; and a control propeller 62 mounted to the aft portion 6 3, of the generally triangular-shaped tail member 56, and disposed to rotate in a substantially vertical plane. In practice, the triangularshaped tail member 56 could be molded from plastic to form a single panel with a stud molded therein for receiving the control propeller 62. A retaining nut 66 is disposed in threaded engagement with the stud as so as to maintain the control propeller 62 in mounted position relative to the triangular-shaped tail member 56.

As hereinbefore mentioned, the forward portion 58, of the generally triangular-shaped tail member 56, is mounted to the downwardly extending leg 46 of the generally Ushaped frame 42. Specifically, the forward portion 58, of the generally triangular-shaped tail member 56, has two tubular members 68 and 7t? suitably secured thereto. The tubular members 68 and '79 are disposed around the leg 46 and are free to rotate relative thereto except when set screws 72 and '74 are in the set position to maintain the generally triangular-shaped tail member 56 in the normal operative fixed position relative to the generally U-shaped frame 42. Thus, by unloosening the set screws 72 and 74 the tail member 56 can be folded back toward the generally U-shaped frame 42 to render the accessory attachment 49 more compact for storage or transporting purposes.

In order to make a noise simulating the noise of a helicopter, noise means "/6 is associated with the lift propeller 50. As shown, the noise means 76 includes two vertically disposed flexible members "78 and Stl which are maintained in fixed relationship to a vertically disposed stud 82 which is suitably secured to the interconnecting portion .3 of the generally U-shaped frame :2. A hub 84, of the lift propeller 50, is provided with a plurality or radially extending grooves 86 which are held in cooperative position relative to the two vertically disposed flexible members 78 and 89 by means of a wing nut 58. Specifically, the flexible members 78 and 8b are disposed in two of the grooves 86 and then when the lift propeller rotates the flexible members 73 and till flex and snap from one set of oppositely disposed grooves 86 to another, to thus effect a noise simulating the noise of a helicopter. In practice, the rotation of the ift propeller St is effected by the force of wind under proper conditions or by the child 5 reaching up and spinning the lift propeller 50 by hand. The control propeller 62 also rotates, under proper conditions, by the force of wind.

In order to support the generally U-shaped frame 42 in an upright position so that the generally U-shaped frame extends overhead of the child 54- when seated on the seat 36 in a position to operate the tricycle 12 and thus partially encloses the child 54, the leg 46, of the frame 42, is adapted to be mounted to the aft end of the tricycle 12 and the leg 44, of the frame 42, is adapted to be mounted to the forward end of the tricycle 12. Specifically, the lower end of the leg 45 is suitably secured to the middle of a bow-shaped member 9% the two ends of which are mounted to the rear cross frame brace 29, of the tricycle 12, by means of ring clamps 92 and 94. On the other hand, the lower end of the leg 44, of the generally U-shaped frame 42, is suitably secured to a U-shaped snap-on clamp 96 which is mounted to the head 24 of the tricycle 12.

For the purpose of giving a further enclosing effect for the child 54, a windshield 98 is mounted to the leg 44, of the generally U-shaped frame 42, by means of ring clamps tea and 192. In practice, the windshield 98 and the propellers d and 62 may be constructed from plastic, the material for the windshield 93 being transparent. Although the enerally U-shaped frame 42 could also be constructed from plastic it would probably be preferable to construct it from tubular steel or aluminum.

Referring to FIGS. 4 through 7 there is illustrated another embodiment of the teachings of this invention in which like components of P165. 1 through 3 and FIGS. 4 through 7 have been given the same reference characters. The main distinction between the apparatus of FIGS. 4 through 7 and FIGS. 1 through 3 is that in the apparatus of FIGS. 4 through 7 an accessory attachment 111 is provided which gives more of an enclosing effect for the child 54 than does the accessory attachment 41') illustrated in FIGS. 1 through 3. In addition, in the apparatus shown in F168. 4 through 7 means 112 is provided for effecting a rotation of a plastic lift ropeller 113 and a plastic control propeller 114 in response to movement of the tricycle 12.

In general, the accessory attachment 119 includes a generally U-shaped frame 115 which is adapted to be mounted to the front and aft end of the tricycle 12 so that the frame 115 extends overhead of the child 54 when seated in a position to operate the tricycle 12 to thus partially enclose the child 5 a generally triangularshaped tail member 115 having a forward portion 118 and an aft portion 1219, the forward portion 118 being mounted to the generally U-shaped frame 115; the lift propeller 113 mounted to the generally U-shaped frame 115 at a position overhead the child 54 and disposed to rotate in a substantially horizontal plane; and the control propeller 114 mounted to the aft portion 129, of the generally triangular-shaped tail member 116, and disposed to rotate in a substantially vertical plane.

In particular, the generally U-shaped frame 115 includes two generally U-shaped members 126 and 123 constructed of tubular steel or aluminum and a plastic canopy 13%, having a front portion 132 and a rear portion 134. The generally U-shaped member 126 includes a front leg 13% which extends downwardly from the front portion 132, of the canopy 139, a rear leg 133 which extends downwardly from the rear portion 134, of the canopy 13%), and an interconnecting portion 14% disposed between the legs 136 and 138. On the other hand, the generally U-shaped member 123 includes a front leg 142 which extends downwardly from the front portion 132, of the canopy 139, a rear leg 144 which extends downwardly from the rear portion 134, of the canopy 13-3, and an interconnecting portion 14% disposed between the legs 142 and 144. As shown, the canopy 13b is disposed between the interconnecting portions 149 and 14-6 of the U-shaped members 126 and 123, respectively, and is suitably secured thereto by, for instance, a strong adhering glue.

The generally U-shaped member 126 is disposed on one side of the vertical longitudinal plane of the generali ly U-shaped frame and the generally U-shaped member 128 is disposed on the other side of the vertical longitudinal plane of the frame 115 the two generally lJ-shaped members 126 and 123 are so disposed that their respective front legs 13s and 1 12, their respective rear legs 133 and 144, and their respective int rconnecting portions and 146 are substantially in alignment with one another in a direction transverse to the vertical longitudinal plane of the generally U-shaped frame 115.

As shown, the two transversely spaced front legs 136 and 142, of the generally U-shaped frame 115, are adapted to be mounted to the forward end of the tricycle 12 and the two transversely spaced rear legs 13% and 144 are adapted to be mounted to the aft end of the tricycle 12. In particular, the front legs and 142, of the generally U-shaped frame 115, meet and unite at the bottom arid are interconnected with a U-shaped snap-on clamp 1% by means of an interconnecting member 152. As illustrated, the clamp 15% is mounted to the head 24 of the tricycle 12. On the other hand, the rear legs 133 and 144, of the generally U-shaped frame 115 are adapt: ed to be mounted to the rear cross frame brace 21? of the tricycle 12. Specifically, ring cla ps 15d and 15s are suitably connected to the bottom of the rear legs 13% and 1 34, respectively, and are mounted to the rear cross frame brace 29 of the tricycle 12.

The generally U-shaped frame 115' also includes braces 153 and 16?; which are interposed between and suitably secured to the rear legs 13% and 144 of the generally U-shaped frame 115. in practice, the generally triangulat-shaped tail member 116 is made of plastic and includes a bulkhead 152 which is mounted to the braces 158 and 16% by means of ring clamps 164 which are suitably secured to the bulkhead 152.

A seat 166 is mounted to the brace 16%. In practice, the conventional tricycle seat not shown that is normally associated with tricycle 12 is removed before mounting the accessory attachment 110 to the tricycle. A front windshield 168 of transparent plastic is disposed between the canopy 13b and the front legs 136 and 142, of the generally U-shaped frame 115, and is suitably secured thereto. A rear windshield 170, of transparent plastic, is disposed between the canopy 1313, the rear legs 138 and 144, and the forward portion 113, of the tail mem her 116, and is suitably secured thereto.

As hereinbefore mentioned, means 112, interconnected between the tricycle 12 and the lift propeller 113 and the control propeller 114 is provided for effecting a rotation of the propellers 113 and 114 in response to movement of the tricycle 12. As illustrated, the means 112 includes a wheel 172, or" hard rubber; a shaft 174 fixed to the wheel 172; a shaft 176 threaded to the hub 178, of the lift propeller 113; a flexible cable 181), having a casing 181, interconnected between the shaft 1'74, of the wheel 172, and the shaft 176, of the lift propeller 113; an L-shaped frame 152 suitably secured to the generally triangularshaped tail member 116 for supporting the shaft 174 and maintaining the wheel 172 in frictional engagement with the rear wheel 13, of the tricycle 12; and means 184 interconnected between the flexible shaft 1%? and the control propeller 114 for effecting a rotation of the control propeller 1114 upon rotation of the flexible cable 18%.

Referring in particular to FIGS. 5 and 7, the L-shaped frame 182 includes a bracket 185 and a U-shaped support member 188 for supporting the shaft 174 of the wheel 172. A slot 190 is provided in the bracket 186 so that the position of the support member 13$ is adjustable relative to the bracket 136, so that the proper pressure can be maintained between the Wheel 172 and the wheel 18 of the tricycle 12. This adjustment is accomplished by unloosening a nut and bolt assembly 192 and then forcing the support member 188 downward to obtain a proper pressure between the Wheels 18 and 172 and then tightening the nut and bolt assembly 192 to maintain the desired pressure.

Referring to FIG. 6, a collar 194 is mounted to the canopy 139 by means of nut and bolt assemblies 196. A vertically disposed sleeve 198 is welded to the collar 194 and has disposed therein and welded thereto a metal tubular member 2%. In order to maintain the shaft 175 in a given position and yet be free to rotate, a roller bearing 262 has its inner race fixed to the shaft 176 and its outer race fixed relative to the sleeve 198.

For the purpose of simulating a noise of a helicopter the hub 178, of the lift propeller 113, is provided with a plurality of radially extending grooves 204. Two vertically disposed flexible members 296 and 208 are supported by the sleeve 198 and are disposed in oppositely disposed grooves 204 of the hub 173. Thus, upon rotation of the lift propeller 113 the flexible members 2536 and 2&3 flex and snap into the various oppositely disposed grooves 204, to thereby effect the desired noise. A wing nut 212 is disposed in threaded engagement with the shaft 176 so as to maintain the lift propeller 113 in a fixed vertical position relative to the flexible members 2G6 and 208.

Still referring to FIG. 6, the means 184 for effecting a rotation of the control propeller 114 in response to the rotation of the flexible cable 180 includes a pulley 214 which is fixed to the flexible cable 180 and is supported by a bracket 216 which in turn is supported by the rear leg 13%, of the generally U-shaped frame 115; a double pulley 218 which is supported by the generally triangularshaped tail member 116; a pulley 220 which is fixed to a shaft 222 of the control propeller 114; and a pulley cable 224 which extends from one side of the pulley 214 to one side of the double pulley 218, the pulley 220, and the other side of the double pulley 218, back to the other side of the pulley 214. Thus, with the control propeller 114 threaded to the shaft 222 and with a wing nut 226 maintaining the control propeller 114 in fixed position relative to the shaft 222, the propeller 114 rotates in accordance with the rotation of the flexible cable 180.

In order to support the propeller shaft 222 and yet provide freedom of rotation of the shaft 222 the inner race of a roller bearing 228 is fixed to the shaft 222 with the outer race of the bearing 228 supported by a vertical support member 236 which is adjustable with respect to a sleeve 232 which is suitably secured to the generally triangularly-shaped tail member 116. Specifically, by unloosening a set screw 234 the vertical support member 230 can be moved upwards so as to maintain the proper tension on the pulley cable 224.

For the purpose of making repairs to or adjustments on the means 112 for effecting a rotation of the propellers 113 and 114, an access door 236 is provided in the tail member 116.

The operation of the means 112 for effecting a rotation of the propellers 122 and 124 in response to a movement of the tricycle 12 will now be described. Vthen the child 54 pedals the tricycle 12 the rear wheel 18 of the tricycle 12 rotates to thus effect a rotation of the wheel 172 and thereby a rotation of the flexible cable 130. Since the flexible cable 180 is connected to the vertical propeller shaft 176 the lift propeller 113 rotates. Simultaneously, the rotation of the flexible cable 181 effects a rotation of the control propeller 114 as hereinbefore described.

Referring to FIGS. 8 and 9 there is illustrated another embodiment of the teachings in which like components of FIGS. 1 through 3 and FIGS. 8 and 9 have been given the same reference characters. The main distinction between the present embodiment and the two previously described embodiments is that in the present embodiment an accessory attachment 241 is carried by the handlebar 34, of the tricycle 12, and turns therewith, thereby converting a tricycle 12 to a toy vehicle simulating a hellcopter.

As illustrated, the accessory attachment 240 includes a frame 241 which comprises a V-shaped member 242,

having two downwardly extending legs 244 and 246, and a substantially horizontal support member 248 secured to the crotch of the V-shaped frame 242 and adapted to extend overhead and rearward of the child 54 when seated on the tricycle 12 so as to partially enclose the child 54; a lift propeller 250 mounted on the frame 241 overhead the child 54 when seated on the tricycle 12 and disposed to rotate in a substantially horizontal plane; and a control propeller 252 suitably mounted on the horizontal support member 243 aft of the lift propeller 25% and so mounted as to be able to freely rotate in a substantially vertical plane.

As shown, the horizontal support member 243 includes a downwardly curved nose portion 254 which is positioned forward of where the horizontal support member 248 is secured to the crotch of the V-shaped member 242. The curved nose portion 254 has a plurality of propeller mounting apertures 256 and 253 disposed therein and spaced therealong so that the lift propeller 254} can also alternatively be mounted at the apertures 256 and 258 to thus so dispose the lift propeller 250 that it can rotate respectively in a plane that is at an angle of 45 degrees to the horizontal and in a substantially vertical plane. The planes of rotation for these latter two positions of the lift propeller 25!? are shown at 26% and 262.

In particular, the lift propeller 25b is mounted on a stud 264 and is free to rotate with respect thereto. An opening extends through the horizontal support member 248 and the crotch of the V-shaped member 242. A portion of the stud 254 of reduced diameter extends through this latter opening so that the shoulder formed by the portion of the stud 264 of reduced diameter bears against the V-shaped member 242 and a nut 266 is threaded in engagement with the portion of the stud 264 of reduced diameter to maintain the stud in fixed relationship with respect to the frame 241. When it is desired to change the location of the lift propeller 250 the nut 266 is removed and the portion of the stud 26d of reduced diameter is inserted in either the aperture 256 or 258. The nut 266 is then disposed in threaded engagement with the portion of the stud 264 of reduced diameter to thus maintain the stud 264 in fixed position with respect to the horizontal support member 248. An auxiliary nut and bolt assembly (not shown) is then disposed in the opening from which the stud 264 has been removed to thereby maintain the horizontal support member 243 in fixed position relative to the t -shaped member 242.

As hereinbefore mentioned the accessory attachment 249 is carried by the handlebar 34 of the tricycle 12. In particular, the lower end of the leg 244, of the V-shaped member 242, is connected to a ring clamp 26% which is mounted to the left side 270 of the handlebar 34. On the other hand, the lower end of the leg 245, of the V- shaped member 242, is connected to a ring clamp 272 which is mounted to the right side 274 of the handle bar 34.

in practice, the propellers 259 and 252 are preferably constructed from plastic and the V-shaped member 242 and the horizontal support member 243 are preferably constructed of tubular steel or aluminum.

Again referring to the two embodiments in FIGS. 1 through 7 .it is to be understood that the generally U- shaped frames 42 and can be mounted to the tricycle 12 at positions different than that shown. For instance, the leg 46, of the U-shaped frame 42, could be mounted to the longitudinal frame bar 22 at some position rearward of the tricycle seat 36. In like manner, the rear legs 138 and 144, of the U-Uhaped frame 115, could be mounted to the longitudinal frame bar 22 at some posi tion in the aft end of the tricycle 12. Although not preferred, the leg 44, of the U-shaped frame 42, and the front legs 1' 6 and M2, of the U-shaped frame 115, could be mounted to the forward end of the tricycle 12 at a position other than at the head 24.

It is also to be understood that although in the two embodiments shown in FIGS. 1 through 7 the accessory attachments and 110' are illustrated and described as being removable they could in practice be fixed to the forward and aft ends of the tricycle 12 and thus nonremovable. in addition, a means (not shown) similar to the means 112 shown in FIGS. 4 through 7 could be provided for the embodiment shown in FlGS. l'th-rough 3 so that either or both of the propellers and 62 rotate in response to a movement of the tricycle 12. Also, the means 112 could be removed from the embodiment shown in FIGS. 4 through 7.

Since certain changes may be made in the above described apparatus and difierent embodiments of the invention may be made without departing from the spirit and scope thereof, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

I claim as my invention:

1. In a toy vehicle, the combination comprising, a tricycle having a forward and an aft end and adapted to be operated by a child, a generally U-shaped frame including two downwardly extending legs, means for mounting one of the two downwardly extending legs of the generally U-shaped frame to the forward end of the tricycle and for mounting the other of the two downwardly extending legs of the generally U-shaped frame to the aft end of the tricycle so that the generally U- shaped frame extends overhead of the child when seated in a position to operate the tricycle and thus partially encloses the child, a lift propeller mounted to the generally U-shaped frame at a position overhead the seated child, a generally triangular-shaped tail member having a forward and an aft portion, means for mounting the forward portion of the generally triangular-shaped tail member to the downwardly extending leg of the generally U-shaped frame that is mounted to the aft end of the tricycle so that the generally triangular-shaped tail member extends rear-ward of the tricycle, and a control propeller mounted to the aft portion of the generally triangular-shaped tail member.

2. An accessory attachment for converting a tricycle, that has a forward and an aft end and is adapted to be operated by a child, to a toy vehicle simulating a helicopter, comprising, a generally U-shaped frame includtwo legs, one of the two legs of the generally U- shaped frame being adapted to be mounted to the forward end of the tricycle and the other of the two legs of the generally U-shaped frame being adapted to be mounted to the aft end of the tricycle so that when the child is seated in a position to operate the tricycle and the generally U-shaped frame is in the mounted position the generally U-shaped frame extends overhead the child to thus partially enclose the child, a lift propeller carried by the generally U-shaped frame at a position overhead the seated child when the generally U-shaped frame is in the mounted position, a generally triangular-shaped :tail member having a forward and an a-ft portion, means ;-for mounting the forward portion of the generally triangular-shaped tail member to the downwardly extend- :ing leg of the generally Ushaped frame that is mounted to the aft end of the tricycle so that the generally triangular-shaped tail member extends rearward of the tricycle, and a control propeller mounted to the aft portion of the generally triangular-shaped tail member.

3. In a toy vehicle, the combination comprising, a tricycle adapted to be operated by a child and having a head and a rear cross frame brace, a generally U-shaped frame including two downwardly extending legs and an interconnecting portion disposed between the legs, means for mounting one of the two downwardly extending legs of the generally U-shaped'frame' to the head of the tricycle and for mounting the other of the two downwardly extending legs of the generally U-shaped frame to the rear cross frame brace of the tricycle so that the generally U-shaped frame extends overhead of the child when seated in a position to operate the tricycle to thus partially enclose the child, a lift propeller mounted to the interconnecting portion disposed bet-ween the two downwardly extending legs of the generally U-shaped frame and disposed to rotate in a substantially horizontal plane, a windshield mounted to the downwardly extending leg of the generally U-shaped frame that is mounted to the head of the tricycle, a generally triangular-shaped tail member having a forward and an aft portion, means for mounting the forward portion of the generally triangularshaped tail member to the downwardly extending leg of the generally U-shaped frame that is mounted to the rear cross frame brace of the tricycle so that the generally triangular-shaped tail member extends rearward of the tricycle, and a control propeller mounted to the aft portion of the generally triangular-shaped tail member and disposed to rotate in a substantially vertical plane.

4. An accessory attachment for converting a tricycle, that can be operated by a child and has a head and a rear ross frame brace, to a toy vehicle simulating a helicopter, comprising, a generally U-shaped frame including two legs and an interconnecting portion disposed between the legs, one of the two legs of the generally U- shaped frame being adapted to be mounted to the head of the tricycle and the other of the two legs of the generally U-shaped frame being adapted to be mounted to the rear cross frame brace of the tricycle so that when the child is seated in a position to operate the tricycle and the generally U-shaped frame is in the mounted position the generally U-shaped frame extends overhead the child to thus partially enclose the child, a lift propeller mounted to the interconnecting portion disposed between the two legs of the generally U-shaped frame and disposed to rotate in a substantially horizontal plane when the generally U-shaped frame is in the mounted position, a windshield mounted to the leg of the generally U- shaped frame that is adapted to be mounted to the head of the tricycle, a generally triangular-shaped tail member having a forward and an aft portion, means for mounting the forward portion of the generally triangular-shaped tail member to the leg of the generally U-shaped frame that is adapted to be mounted to the rear cross frame brace of the tricycle so that the generally triangularshaped tail member extends rearward of the tricycle when the generally U-shaped frame is in the mounted position, and a control propeller mounted to the'aft portion of the generally triangular-shaped tail member and disposed to rotate in a substantially vertical plane when the generally U-shaped frame is in the mounted position.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 13.158936 Crowder June 13, 1950 2,264,030 Tomasini Nov. 25, 1941 2,761,689 Becker Sept. 4, 1956 3,003,774 Russell Oct. 10, 1961 FOREIGN PATENTS 65,443 Switzerland June 2, 1913 106,915 Switzerland Sept. 16, 1924

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2264030 *Jan 18, 1941Nov 25, 1941Emily Saroka TomasiniCycloplane
US2761689 *Dec 18, 1953Sep 4, 1956Bernard Becker ArthurAirplane simulating attachment for tricycles
US3003774 *Mar 9, 1961Oct 10, 1961Ryland RussellSimulated helicopter
USD158936 *May 25, 1948Jun 13, 1950 Helicopter toy
CH65443A * Title not available
CH106915A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3347557 *Oct 23, 1965Oct 17, 1967Cruson Marion JChild's rideable tank
US5022666 *Nov 2, 1990Jun 11, 1991Simon Gregory LFacade for child's play vehicle
US7399183 *Jan 24, 2005Jul 15, 2008Kelly Michael CBicycle combat simulator
US20110089674 *Apr 21, 2011Silvertop Associates, Inc. D/B/A Rasta ImpostaStroller covers
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/1.12, D12/108
International ClassificationA63H33/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H33/00
European ClassificationA63H33/00