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Publication numberUS3117873 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 14, 1964
Filing dateMar 20, 1959
Priority dateMar 20, 1959
Also published asDE1878764U
Publication numberUS 3117873 A, US 3117873A, US-A-3117873, US3117873 A, US3117873A
InventorsBartels Herbert D, Flugge Sylvester L, Irland Lewis F
Original AssigneeContinental Can Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Package and method of forming same
US 3117873 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 14, 1964 H. D. BARTELS ETAL 3,117,373

meager: AND METHOD OF FORMING SAME Filed March 20, 1959 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 m m m m MO m FM 7 Lm S/E f Jan. 14, 1964 H. D. BARTELS ETAL 3,117,873

PACKAGE AND METHOD OF FORMING SAME Filed March 20, 1959 s Sheets-Sheet 2 HERBERT D BARTELs Snvssrm L. Hues: LEW/s F //?LAND INVENTORS ATTORNE'YS H. D. BARTELS ETAL 3,117,873

PACKAGE AND METHOD OF FORMING SAME Jan. 14, 1964 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed March 20, 1959 mm aw mu 45w B D k mm l R s mum mm ATTORNEYS United States Patent PACKAGE AND METHOD OF FORMING SAME Herbert l). Bartels, (Ihicago, Sylvester L. Flugge, Gal:

Park, and Lewis F. Irland, Hinsdale, 111., assignors to Continental Can Company, Inc., New York, N.Y., a

corporation of New York Filed Mar. 29, 1959, Ser. No. 8%,697 Claims. (Cl. 99-171) The invention relates generally to the art of packaging, and primarily seeks to provide a novel method of packaging food products, particularly coffee.

At the present time, coffee is packaged in sealed cans both by a vacuum process and a pressure process, with the vacuum process being the more conventional. However, vacuum packaging .has several inherent disadvanages. One of the primary disadvantages is that in order to prevent collapsing of the can body due to atmospheric pressure on the exterior of the can, it is necessary to form the can of a heavier gauge metal, with the resultant undesired added expense. Secondl, the coffee may generate gases which will eliminate the vacuum in the can and thus falsely indicate to the consumer that the can was improperly sealed and the coflee is no longer fresh. It is, of course, highly desirable to eliminate these conditions.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel package which includes a container having a fill therein and where the fill is initially vacuum packed in the container to remove air from t e container, after which the container is deformed to compressively engage the fill, whereby the fill forcefully engages the container body to support the container body.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel package which includes a can having a fill therein, the can body being provided with an annular bead, and the fill being initially vacuum packed within the can, after which the can is foreshortened by the deformation of the head to move the can ends into compressive engagement with the fill whereby the fill is forced outwardly to support the can body.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a novel method of, packaging food products, such as coffee, wherein the food product is placed within a can, a vacuum is applied to the can and the food product to remove a major portion of the air from the can, with the can being sealed in this condition, after which the can is deformed to reduce the volume thereof and to move the ends of the can into compressive engagement with the having a can body with a peripheral bead, vacuum packaging the food product in the can, removing the can to the atmosphere where the atmospheric pressure on the can will result in a foreshortening of the can by partially deforming the bead, and then finally applying a mechanically actuated pressure on the can to further foreshorten the can to a predetermined height, whereby the food product is compressively engaged by the can ends and is forced outwardly into engagement with the can body so as to form a support for the can body, and at the same time, the canis substantially free of air.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel package which includes a container having a granular type fill therein, the container being in the form of a can wherein the fill has been vacuum packed and while the sealed can is stih under a vacuum, an end thereof is URE merited.- Jan. 14, 1%34 mechanically deformed inwardly so as to reduce the volume of the can and force the ends-of the can'into engagement with the fill, thereby compacting the fill and urging the'fill outwardly into supporting engagement with the can body.

Still anotherobject of the invention is to provide a novel package construction wherein a can is filled with a granular product, such as coffee, and the product is vacuum packedin the can, the can being formed of relatively light metal and at the same time, being so supported by the fill within the can whereby the can has sufficient can body wall strength to prevent can paneling and to prevent am'al load collapse of the can due to vertical forces applied thereon.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a novel method of packaging products whereby the can in which the product is packaged maybe formed of relativelylight metal with the product being so disposed within the can that it supports or tends to support the body of the can.

With the above, and other objects in view that will hereinafter appear, the nature of the invention will be more clearly understood by reference to the following detailed description, the appended claims and the several views illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a diagrammatic view showing sequentially the steps involved in a first method of packaging a product in accordance with the invention.

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged fragmentary elevational view, with parts broken away and shown in section, of a can body having the desired fill therein and the end of the can being set in place.

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged fragmentary elevational View similar to FIGURE 2, and shows the can after the end of the can has been sealed to the can body.

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged fragmentary elevational view similar to FIGURE 2, and shows the can and the fill after the can has been partially foreshortened by the effect of atmospheric pressure thereon.

FIGURE 5 is another enlarged fragmentary elevational view of the can and-fill, and shows the final shape of the can and the rela ionship of the can with respect to the till after the can has been foreshortenedto a predetermined height.

FIGURE 6 is a diagrammatic view of a second method of packaging a product in accordance with the invention.

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged fragmentary elevational view, with parts broken away and shown in section, of a can body and can top used in the method illustrated in FIG- FIGURE 8 is an enlarged fragmentary elevational view similar to FIGURE 7, and shows the can body and the can end after the can end has been sealed to the can body.

FIGURE 9 is another fragmentary enlarged elevational View, similar to FIGURE 7, and shows the can after the can body has been foreshortened to a predetermined height, and the ends of the can moved into compressive engagement with the fill.

FIGURE 10 is a diagrammatic view showing in sequence the steps of a third method of packaging a product in accordance with the invention.

FIGURE 11 is an enlarged fragmentary elevational view, with parts broken away and shown in section, of a can body and can top used in the method of FIGURE 10.

FIGURE 12 is an enlarged fragmentary elevational View, similar to FIGURE 11, and shows the can end sealed to the can body, with the fill vacuum packed there- FIGURE 13 is an enlarged fragmentary elevational view, similar to FIGURE 11, and shows the details of the can and the fill in the can after one of the can ends has 3 been bowed inwardly into compressive engagement with the fill.

A first embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIGURES 1 through 5, inclusive, of the drawings. In this embodiment of the invention, the apparatus utilized in the packaging of the product includes an endless conveyor, generally referred to by the numeral 5. The endless conveyor 5 includes a drive roller 6 and an idler roller 7. An endless conveyor belt 8 is entrained over the drive roller 6 and the idler roller 7.

A feed chute 9 is disposed at the left end of the conveyor 5 for feeding cans to the conveyor 5. A can receiving chute 10 is disposed at the right end of the conveyor 5 for receiving filled cans from the conveyor 5. Although the means for feeding cans to the conveyor and the means for receiving cans from the conveyor have been illustrated as being chutes, it is to be derstood that any desired type of can conveying means may be used for these purposes.

A fill dispenser 11 overlies the upper run of the conveyor belt 8 adjacent the left end of the conveyor 5. A levelling mechanism 12 is disposed to the right of the fill dispenser for the purpose of levelling the fill within a can. The levelling mechanism includes a shaft 13 having a blade 14 at the lower end thereof. The blade is rotated to level the fill within a can. It is to be understood that the levelling mechanism 12 illustrated is only an example of one of many types of levelling mechanisms which may be utilized for the purpose.

A vacuum chamber 15 is disposed intermediate the ends of the conveyor 5, with the conveyor 5 running through the vacuum chamber. The vacuum chamber may be of any desired type, and since vacuum chambers of this general type are conventional, no further description of the details thereof will be set forth here.

A mechanical plunger assembly, generally referred to by the numeral 16, is disposed adjacent the right end of the conveyor 5 in overlying relation to the top run of the conveyor belt 8. The mechanical plunger assembly 16 includes a shaft 17 having a presser foot 18 at the lower end thereof. The shaft 17 and the presser foot will be mounted for vertical movement in any desired manner. If desired, a back-up plate 19 will be placed underneath the upper run of the conveyor belt 8 in alignment with the mechanical plunger assembly 16 in order to support the can during the operation of the mechanical plunger assembly.

Reference is now had to FIGURE 2, wherein there is illustrated a coffee can which is to be used in accordance with the invention, the coffee can being generally referred to by the numeral 20. The coffee can 20 in cludes a can body generally referred to by the numeral 21, a bottom can end 22 and a top can end or cover 23. The lower edge of the can body 21 is connected to the bottom can end 22 by means of the conventional double seam 24.

The can body 21 is provided adjacent the upper edge thereof with a collar and a tear strip Also, the upper edge of the can body 21 is flanged, as at 27, for the reception of the top can end 23. The intermediate portion of the can body 2%? is provided with a plurality of beads. Although a number of beads have been shown in the can body side wall, it is to be understood that one or more thereof, designated 28, will be made more readily deformable than other head means for reasons to be described hereinafter.

Reference is again had to FIGURE 1, wherein it is shown that empty cans 2d are placed on the top run of a conveyor belt 8 at the left end of the conveyor 5'. As the empty cans 21} pass beneath the fill dispenser 11, the desired fill 29 is dispensed into the can 2%) through the open upper end thereof. The can 20 then moves to the right beneath the levelling mechanism 12 where the blade 14 engages the fill 2h projecting upwardly out of the can 29 and levels the fill.

The can and the fill are then moved into the vacuum chamber 15 where the top can end or cover 23 is set in place on the can body 21. The can 28, as it appears in this position, is best illustrated in FIGURE 2. While the desired vacuum is maintained within the can 26, the can end 23 is sealed to the can body 21 by a conventional can closing mechanism (not shown) through the formation of a double seam 3%, as is best shown in FIGURE 3.

After the fill 29 has been vacuum packed in the can 2%, the can 2% moves out of the vacuum chamber 15 where it is subjected to atmospheric pressure. The effect of the atmospheric pressure on the can 23 is to foreshorten the can 24 by the deformation of the bead means 23. The foreshortened can and the relationship of the ends of the can with respect to the fill 29 are best illustrated in FIGURE 4.

The can 2%, having been foreshortened by the efiect of atmospheric pressure thereon, next passes beneath the mechanical plunger assembly 16. The mechanical plung er assembly 16 moves downwardly and the presser foot 18 thereof engages the top of the can 26.? and further foreshortens the can 2% to a predetermined height. Thus, all of the cans 29 passing off the conveyor 5 will have the same height, as is required for packaging and stacking. This further foreshortening of the can 20 results in a further deformation of the head 28, and the final package is illustrated in FTGURE 5, the package being generally referred to by the numeral 31.

When the can 2 is sealed within the vacuum chamber 15, a vacuum exists within the can 2% and a major portion of the undesired air has been removed from the can 20. When the can 29 is subjected to atmospheric pressure, it immediately collapses endwise by the deformation of the head 2% inasmuch as the bead 28 offers the least resistance to the deformation of the can 2%. At this time, the can ends 22 and 23 may or may not compressively engage the fill 29. However, when the can 213 is again foreshortened to the predetermined height, the movement of the can end 23 towards the can end 22 results in the engagement of the fill by the can ends, with the fill, particularly when the fill is of a granular type, being both compressively engaged by the can ends and compacted thereby. The fill then is urged outwardly and moves into supporting engagement with the can body 21. Thus, by

- foreshortening the height of the can 20, the fill 29 of the can 2i is urged into a supporting relation with respect to both the can body and the can ends. in view of this, a lighter gauge metal may be used in the construction of the can 2t) than is normally used in cans of this type when the product is vacuum packed therein.

Reference is now had to FIGURES 6 through 9, inclusive, wherein the apparatus utilized in a second method of packaging in accordance with the invention and the package resulting from the method are illustrated. The apparatus is best illustrated in FIGURE 6, and includes a conveyor generally referred to by the numeral 32. The conveyor 32 is of the endless belt type and includes a drive roller 33 and an idler roller 34 which are disposed in spaced relation. An endless conveyor belt 35 is entrained over the drive roller 33 and the idler roller 34.

A feed chute 36 is disposed at the left end of the conveyor 32 for the purpose of delivering cans at predetermined intervals to the top run of the conveyor belt 35. A package receiving chute 37 is disposed at the right end of the conveyor 32 for receiving completed packages from the conveyor 32. Although the means for supplying cans to the conveyor and receiving packages from the conveyor have been illustrated as being chutes, it is to be understood that other types of conveyors may be used.

The packaging apparatus also includes a fill dispenser 38 which is disposed adjacent to the left end of the conveyor 32. A levelling mechanism, generally referred to by the numeral 39, is disposed to the right of the fill dispenser 33. The levelling mechanism 39 includes a rotatable shaft 40 which has secured to the lower end thereof a blade 41. The levelling mechanism 39 has only been diagrammatically illustrated, and may function in any desired manner to level the fill in the can.

A vacuum chamber 42 occupies a major part of the right half of the conveyor 32. The vacuum chamber 42 is so constructed that the entire conveyor 32 runs therethrough. The vacuum chamber 42 has been merely illus trated in the form of a box having an air outlet. However, further description is believed to be unnecessary inasmuch as the vacuum chamber 42 is of a conventional type and in itself plays no part in the invention.

Reference is-now had to "FIGURE 7 in particular, wherein there is illustrated a can which is to be used with the packaging apparatus of FIGURE 6, the can'being generally referred to by the numeral 43. The can 43, for

the most part, has the construction and configuration of a conventional type of coffee can. The can 43 includes a can body generally referred to by the numeral 44, a bottom can end 45 and a top can end or cover 46. The bottom can end 45 is secured to the lower edge of the can body 44 by a conventional double seam 47. The can body 44 has an internal bead 48 formed about the lower part thereof. The can body 44 is provided adjacent the upper edge thereof with a tear strip 49 which is backed by means of a collar 59. Also, the upper end of the can body 44 is flanged, as at 51, for the formation of a double seam with the can top end 46.

Referring once again to FIGURE 6, it will be seen that cans 43 are delivered onto the left end of the conveyor 32 from the feed chute 36. As the cans 43 move from left to right on the top run of the conveyor belt 35, each the can 43, with the fill 52 therein, passes beneath the levelling mechanism 39, the blade 41 will be lowered into engagement with the upper part of the fill and turned so as to level ofi the fill in the can 43.

After the fill has been levelled in the can 43, the can passes into the vacuum chamber 42 where the top can end or cover 46 is placed on the can body 44 overlying the fill, in the position best illustrated in FIGURE 7. The can top end 46 is then sealed to the can body 44 by means of a conventional type of closing machine which forms a conventional double seam 53 between the can top end 46 and the can body 44, as is best illustrated in FIGURE 8. When the can 43 is sealed, the major portion of the air has been evacuated from the can, and the fill 52 is vacuum packed in the can.

A mechanical plunger assembly 54 is disposed inside the vacuum chamber 42 adjacent the right edge thereof. The mechanical plunger assembly 54 includes a verticflly reciprocating shaft 55 which is provided at the lower end thereof with a presser foot 56. If necessary, a back-up plate 57 will underlie thetop run of the conveyor belt 35 beneath the presser foot 56 to prevent downward movement of the conveyor belt 35 and the can 43 when the can 43 is engaged by the presser foot 55.

When a sealed can 43 passes beneath the presser foot 56, the mechanical plunger assembly 54 is automatically actuated to move downwardly so that the presser foot 56 engages the upper end of the can 43. The presser foot 56 continues its downward movement until the height of the can 43 has been foreshortened and reduced to a. predetermined height so that all cans passing out of the vacuum chamber 42 will have the same height. This is highly desirable for the proper packing and stacking of the cans.

When the height of the can 43 is foreshortened, the decrease in height of the can takes place in the head 48 ly into a can body supporting position. In the event the fill 52 is of a granular material, such as coffee, there will be a compacting of the fill. Thus, although the fill is initially vacuum packed so asto remove a major portion of the undesired air from the can, inthe final state of the package, which is referred to by the numeral 58, the fill is forcibly engaged with the can body 44 and serves to aid in the supporting of the can body. By providing such a relationship between'the fill and the can body, it will be readily apparent that the can body 44 may be formed of a much lighter material with a resulting reduction in the cost of the can.

Another apparatus for carrying forth a third method of the invention is illustrated in FEGURE 10. The apparatus of FIGURE 10 is very similar to the apparatus of FIG- URE 6, and differs therefrom primarily in the shape of several of the fill and can contacting surfaces. The apparatus includes a conveyor, generally referred to by the numeral The conveyor 59 is of the endless belt type, and includes a drive roller fit) and an idler roller '61 which are in spaced relation. An endless conveyor belt packages are received from the right end of the conveyor 59 by means of a package receiving chute 64. Although chuteshave been illustrated for feeding the cans to the conveyor 5? and for receiving the packages therefrom, it

is to be readily understood that other types of means for accomplishing this may be utilized equally as well.

A fill dispenser 65 overlies the top run of the conveyor belt 62 to the right of the left end of the conveyor 59. The fill dispenser 65 may be of any desired type, depending upon the particular fill to be placed in a can, and will be provided with automatic means for controlling the volume or weight of the fill placed in the can. A levelling mechanism 66 is disposed to the right of the fill dispenser 65 in overlying relation to the top run of the conveyor belt 62. The levelling mechanism 66 includes a shaft 67 which is mounted for both vertical and rotary movement. A blade 68 is carried by the lower end of the shaft 67. Depending upon the configuration of the can top end or cover, the lower edge of the blade 68 may be either straight or concave.

A vacuum chamber 7% occupies a major part of the right half of the conveyor 59. The vacuum chamber 79 is of a conventional type and is so constructed that the conveyor 5? passes therethrough. A mechanical plunger assembly 71 is disposed within the vacuum chamber '70 adjacent the right end thereof and in overlying relation to the top run of the conveyor belt 62. The mechanical plunger assembly 71 includes a vertically reciprocating shaft 72. Secured to the lower end of the shaft 72 for movement therewith is a presser'foot 73. Unlikethe presser feet 13 and 56, the presser foot 73 is of a lesser diameter than the can body and is intended to engage only the upper surface of the top can end. Furthermore, it is not'desired to utilize the mechanical plunger assembly '73. for the deformation of the can body, but to depress the top can end therewith. Accordingly, the underside of the presser foot is of a convex cross-section. A backup plate 74 underlies the presser foot 73 and is disposed beneath the top run of the conveyor belt 62 for supporting the top run of the conveyor belt and a can supported thereby during the operation of the mechanical plunger assembly 71.

After the mechanical plunger assembly has. performed its function, the completed package, generally referred to by the numeral 75, passes out of the vacuum chamber 7! When the package 75 reaches the right end of the conveyor 5?, it moves onto the package receiving chute 64 and is delivered to either an inspection station or a packing station, as is desired.

Reference is now made to FIGURE 11, wherein the specific details of a can to be used in conjunction with the apparatus of FIGURE 10 are illustrated, the can being generally referred to by the numeral 76. For the most part, the can 76 is of a construction such as that which is conventionally used for the packaging of coffee. The can 76 includes a can body generally referred to by the numeral 77, a bottom can end 78, and a top can end or cover 79. The bottom can end 73 is secured to the lower edge of the can body 77 by means of a conventional double seam St The can body 77 is of the conventional type used in conjunction with coifee cans and the like, and includes a tear strip 81 adjacent the upper edge thereof. The tear strip 81 is backed up by an internal collar 82, with the upper edge of the collar 32 being disposed above the top edge of the tear strip 81. The upper edge of the can body 77 is outwardly flanged, as at 83, for receiving the can top end 79 and to facilitate the forming of the seal between the can body 77 and the can top end 79.

The can top end 79 is provided with an upwardly bowed central portion 84. This is desirable when the fill for the can 76 is of a granular nature. On the other hand, should the fill be of other type, then the can top end 79 may be fiat or substantially flat.

In the packaging operation, empty cans 76 are delivered to the left end of the conveyor 59 by the feed chute 63. As the cans 76 are moved from left to right along the top run of the conveyor belt 62, the can 76 passes beneath the fill dispenser 65 and the desired fill 85 is deposited into the empty can 76. When the till 85 is of a granular nature, the fill will have a tendency to project above the top edge of the can 76, with the result that it is necessary that the fill be leveled to correspond generally to the configuration of the underside of the can top end 79. This is accomplished by passing the can 76 and the fill beneath the level-ling mechanism 65.

After the fill in the can 76 has been levelled, the can and the fill pass into the vacuum chamber '70, where the can top end or cover 79 is placed on the can 76 in overlying relation to the fill 85 therein. This condition is clearly illustrated in FIGURE 11. While the air is evacuated from the can through the operation of the vacuum chamber 70, the can top end 79 is automatically sealed to the upper edge of the can body 77 by means of a conventional type of can closing machine (not shown) which forms a double seam 86. The fill is now vacuum packed within the can 76.

The sealed can 76 next passes beneath the mechanical plunger assembly 71. In timed relation to the movement of the sealed can 76 beneath the mechanical plunger assembly 71, the shaft 72, and the presser foot 73 carried thereby move downwardly with the presser foot 73 engaging the can top end 79 so as to downwardly bow the can top end, as at 87 (FIGURE 13). The package 75 is now completed and passes out of the vacuum chamber 70 and onto the package receiving chute 64.

In the packaging of the fill $5 in the can 75, it will be readily apparent from the foregoing that the fill 85 is vacuum packed. In this manner, substantially all of the undesired air is moved from the can 76 prior to the sealing thereof. However, although the can is vacuum packed, when the mechanical plunger assembly 71 works on the can top end 79, the can top end 79 moves downwardly into compressive engagement with the fill 85 in the can 76. As a result, the fill is urged outwardly into a supporting relation with respect to the can body 77. Further, when the fill is of a granular nature, such as cofiee, the fill is also compacted by the downward bowing of the can top end 79. Since the fill supports the can body 77, it will be readily apparent that the can body 77 may be made of a lighter gauge metal than that which is normally used in the formation of can bodies wherein the can is intended for the conventional vacuum packaging method. This, of course, results in a saving of metal with the resulting lower cost of manufacture of the can.

At this time, it is pointed out that although the can top end 79 is downwardly bowed, as at 87, the mechanical plunger assembly 71 does not engage any part of the can body 77 nor does it place a force on the can 76 which would toreshorten the can body 77. As a result, although the volume of the can 76 has been reduced, the can is not foreshortened as are the cans 2t) and 43. However, because of close tolerances of manufacture, all of the packages 75 are of the same height, as is necessary for packing and stacking purposes.

While several forms of the invention have been shown for purposes of illustration, it is to be clearly understood that other changes may be made Without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed as new:

1. A method of packaging a food product into a can comprising the steps of providing an empty can having a body with at least one peripheral bead and one end, placing the food product in the can, placing a second can end on the can body, subjecting the can and the food product to a sub-atmospheric pressure and while the can and the food product are under the sub-atmospheric pressure sealing the second can end to the can body and applying an endwise pressure on the can to foreshorten the can to a predetermined height by distorting the bead and to move the can ends into compressive engagement with the food product, and then again subjecting the can to atmospheric pressure.

2. A method of packaging a food product into a can comprising the steps of providing an empty can having a body with at least one peripheral bead and one end, placing the food product in the can, placing a second can end on the can body, subjecting the can and the food product to a sub-atmospheric pressure and while the can and the food product are under the sub-atmospheric pressure sealing the second can end to the can body, and then applying an endwise pressure on the can to foreshorten the can to a predetermined height by distorting the bead and to move the can ends into compressive engagement with the food product.

3. A method of packaging a food product into a can comprising the steps of providing an empty can having a body with at least one peripheral bead and one end, placing the :food product in the can, placing a second can end on the can body, subjecting the can and the food product to a sub-atmospheric pressure and While the can and the food product are under the sub-atmospheric pressure sealing the second can end to the can body, again subjecting the can to atmospheric pressure and permitting the force exerted on the can by the atmospheric pressure to toreshorten the can body by distorting the bead and to move the can ends into engagement with the food product, and then applying an additional endwise pressure on the can to further foreshorten the can to a predetermined can height by further distorting the bead with the can ends compacting the food product.

4. A method of packaging a fill in a container having a body and a pair of ends comprising the steps of providing an empty container, filling the container with the desired fill, placing the container under a sub-atmospheric pressure and while under the sub-atmospheric pressure sealing the container, and then mechanically applying an endwise pressure on the container at a pressure in excess of atmospheric pressure to partially collapse the container and compressively engage the fill with the container ends.

5. A method or" packaging a fill in a container having a body and a pair of ends comprising the steps of providing an empty container, filling the container with the desired fill, placing the container under a sub-atmospheric pressure and while under the sub-atmospheric pressure sealing the container and mechanically applying an end- 9 wise pressure on the container to partially collapse the container about the fill.

6. A method of packaging a fill in a container having a body and a pair of ends comprising the steps of providing an empty container, filling the container with the desired fill, placing the container under a sub-atmosphe ic pressure and while under the sub-atmospheric pressure sealing the container and applying an endwise pressure on one of the container ends to lower ly bow the one container end into compressive engagement with the fill and thus force the fill into pressurized'engagement with the container body.

7. A method of packaging a fill into a can comprising the steps of providing an empty can including a body and one end, placing the fill in the can, placing a second can end on the can body, subjecting the can and the fill to a sub-atmospheric pressure and While the can and fill are under the sub-atmospheric pressure sealing the second can end to the body and applying an endwise pressure on one of the can ends to inwardly bow the one can end into compressive engagement with the fill and thus force the fill into pressurized engagement with the can body to reinforce the can body.

8. A method of packaging a fill in a container having a body and a pair of ends comprising the steps of providing an empty container, filling the container with the desired fill, placing the container under a sub-atmospheric pressure and While under the sub-atmospheric pressure sealing the container, and then applying an endwise pressure on the container and foreshortening-the container body and moving the container ends into compressive engagement with the fill.

9. A method of packaging a fill in a container having a body and a pair of ends comprising the steps of providing an empty container, filling the container with the desired fill, placing the container under a sub-atmopsheric pressure and while under the sub-atmospheric pressure sealing the container, and then mechanically applying an endwise pressure on the container and foreshortening the container to a predetermined container height and moving the container ends into compressive engagement with the fill.

10. A method of packaging a fill in a container having a body and a pair of ends comprising the steps of providing an empty container, filling the container With the esired fill, placing the container under a sub-atmospheric pressure and while under the sub-atmospheric pressure sealing the container and applying an endwise pressure on the container and foreshortening the container body and moving the container ends into compressive engagement with the fill, and then again subjecting the container to atmospheric pressure.

11. A method of packaging a fill in a container having a body and a pair of ends comprising the steps or" providirig an empty container, filling the container with the desired fill, placing the container under a sub-atmospheric pressure and while under the sub-atmospheric pressure sealing the container and mechanically applying an endwise pressure on the container and foreshortening the container to a predetermined container height and moving the conta ner ends into compressive engagement with the fill, and then again subjecting the container to atmospheric pressure.

12. A method of packaging a fill into a can comprising the steps of providing an empty can having a body with at least one peripheral bead and one end, placing the fill in the can, placing a second can end on the can body, subjecting the can and the fill to a sub-atmospheric pressure and While the can and the fill are under the subatmospberic pressure sealing the second can end to the can body and applying an endwise pressure on the can to foreshorten the can to a predetermined height by distorting the bead and to move the can ends into compressive engagement with the fill, and then again subjecting the can to atmospheric pressure.

13. A method of packaging a fill into a can comprising the steps of providing an empty can having a body with at least one peripheral bead and one end, placing the fill in the can, placing a second can end on the can body, subjecting the can and the fill to a sub-atmospheric pressure and while the can and the fill are under the subatmospheric pressure sealing the second can end to the can body, and then applying an endwise pressure on the can to foreshorten the can to a predetermined'height by distorting the bead and to move the can ends into compressive engagement with the fill.

14. A method of packaging a fill in a container having a body and a pair of ends comprising the steps of providing an empty container, filling the container with the desired fill, placing the container under a sub-atmospheric pressure and While under the sub-atmospheric pressure sealing the container, again subjecting the container to atmospheric pressure and permitting the force exerted on the container by the atmospheric pressure and foreshortening the container body and moving the container ends into engagement with the fill, and then applying an additional endwise pressure on the container and further foreshortening the container to a predetermined height with the container ends compacting the fill.

15. A method of packaging a fill into a can comprising the steps of providing an empty can having a body with at least oneperipheral bead and one end, placing the fill in the can, placing a second can end on the can body, subjecting the can and the fill to a sub-atmospheric pressure and While the can and the fill are under the subatmospheric'pressure sealing the second can end to the can body, again subjecting the can to atmospheric-pressure and permitting the force exerted on the can by the atmospheric pressure to foreshorten the can body by distorting the bead and to move the can ends into engagement with the fill, and then applying an additional endwise pressure on the can to further foreshorten the can to a predetermined can height by further distorting the bead with the can ends compacting the fill.

16. A method of packaging a granular fill into a can comprising the steps of providing an empty can including a body and one end, placing the granular fill in the can, levelling the granular fill even with the top of the can body, placing a second can end on the can body, subjecting the fill and the can to a sub-atmospheric pressure and While the can and the fill are under the sub-atmospheric pressure sealing the can end to the can body, and then mechanically applying an endwise pressure greater than atmospheric pressure on the can and moving the can ends towards each other with the can ends compressively engaging and compacting the granular fill.

17. A method of packaging a granular fill into a can comprising the steps of providing an empty can including a body and one end, placing the granular fill in the can, levelling the granular fill even with the top of the can body, placing a second can end on the can body, sealing the can end to the can body, and then mechanically applying an endwise pressure greater than atmospheric pressure on the can and moving the can ends towards each other with the can ends compressively engaging and compacting the granular fill.

18. A package comprising a container having a body and ends, and a granular fill vacuum packed in said container with the container having a lower gas content than when the granular fill is initially placed in said container, said container ends compressively engaging and compacting said fill at a pressure greater than that resulting from atmospheric pressure on said container ends, Whereby said fill forcibly engages said container body and reinforces said container body against external compressive forces.

19. A package comprising a container having a body and ends, and a granular fill vacuum packed in said container with the container having a lower gas content than when the granular fill is initially placed in said container,

at least one of said container ends being inwardly pressed at a pressure greater than that resulting from atmospheric pressure on said container end and compressively engaging and compacting said fill, whereby said fill forcibly engages said container body and reinforces said container body against external compressive forces.

20. A package comprising a container having a body and ends fixedly secured to said body, and a fill in said container, said container body having a peripheral bead, said container body having been foreshortened by the deformation of said bead after the filling of said container and the securing of said ends to said container body, and said container ends compressively engaging said fill to urge said fill outwardly into pressurized engagement with said container body and thus reinforce said container body against external compressive forces.

21. A package comprising a container having a body and ends fixedly secured to said body, and a fill in said container, said container body having a peripheral bead, said container body having been forcibly foreshortened to a predetermined height by the deformation of said bead after the filling of said container and the securing of said ends to said container body, and said container ends compressively engaging said fill to urge said fill outwardly into pressurized engagement With said container body and thus reinforce said container body against external compressive forces.

22. A package comprising a container having a body and ends fixedly secured to said body, and a fill in said container, said container body initially having a peripheral bead adjacent one end thereof, said container body having been forcibly foreshortened to a predetermined height with a substantial collapsing of said bead and said container ends compressively engaging said fill to urge said fill outwardly into pressurized engagement with said container body and thus reinforce said container body, said foreshortening having been accomplished subsequent to the placing of the fill in the container and the securing of said ends to said body.

23. A package comprising a container having a body and ends fixedly secured to said body, and a fill vacuum packed in said container, and the container having a low air content, said container body having at least one peripheral bead spaced from its ends, said container ha ing been forcibly foreshortened to a predetermined height with a substantial distortion of said bead and said container ends compressively engaging said fill to urge said fill outwardly into pressurized engagement with said container body and thus reinforce said container body, said foreshortening having been accomplished subsequent to the placing of the fill in the container and the securing of said ends to said body.

24. A method of packaging a fill in a can comprising the steps of providing an empty can having a body with at least one peripheral bead and a pair of ends placing the fill in the can to substantially fill the can, closing the can, and then foreshortening the can body by distorting the bead to move the can ends into engagement With the fill.

257 A method of packaging a fill in a can comprising the steps of providing an empty can having a body with at least one peripheral bead and a pair of ends, placing the fill in the can to substantially fill the can, closing the can, foreshortening the can body by distorting the bead to move the can ends into engagement with the fill, and then further foreshortening the can body to a predetermined height by further distorting the bead.

References Cited in the file of this patent UN TED STATES PATENTS 1,302,189 McColl Apr. 29, 1919 1,789,946 Rector Jan. 20, 1931 1,992,556 Tone Feb. 26, 1935 2,110,012 Auban Mar. 1, 1933 2,129,906 Moore June 14, 1938 2,423,358 vVheaton et al. July 1, 1947 FOREIGN PATENTS 368,455 Great Britain Mar. 10, 1932

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Classifications
U.S. Classification426/131, 220/274, 53/436, 53/486, 426/397, 220/669, 53/432
International ClassificationB65B61/24, B21D51/30, B65B1/00, B65B1/20, B65D8/12, B65B7/28, B65B31/02, B65D8/04, B65B61/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D7/42, B21D51/30
European ClassificationB65D7/42, B21D51/30