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Publication numberUS3118401 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 21, 1964
Filing dateDec 4, 1961
Publication numberUS 3118401 A, US 3118401A, US-A-3118401, US3118401 A, US3118401A
InventorsGerald R. Piatt
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Radiation protector
US 3118401 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 2l, 1964 G. R. PLATT RADIATION PROTECTOR Filed Deo. 4. 1961 INVENTOR. GERALD R. PLATT BY H|S ATTORNEY United States VPatent O 3,118,401 RADIATION IROTECTOR Gerald R. Platt, 844 Kensington Ave., Salt Lake City, Utah Filed Dec. 4, 1961, Ser. No. 156,759 8 Claims. (Cl. 109-1) The present invention relates to atomic radiation protective enclosures and, more particularly, to a new and extremely versatile, radiation protector adapted for use by a limited number of occupants.

In the past many types of permanent structures have been devised for use by civilians in case of atomic attack. These structures are very expensive to build, and the best ones of the same disposed below grade and underground.

Other types of protectors have been devised in the nature of suits made of impervious material, for example. However, the latter have proven quite ineffective since there is no buffer or insulating zone between the wearer and the outer surface of the suit upon which dust carrying radiation materials would be deposited. Therefore, it is highly impertaive that some provision be provided for spacing between the exposed layer of the protector and the person using the same. This cannot be done to any degree of satisfaction by simply accommodating or adapting a flying suit to this purpose since no appreciable distance will be maintained between the wearer and the exposed outer portion of the garment. Accordingly, the inventor has taken the approach of providing a versatile collapsible construction to serve as a radiation protective enclosure and which will be of light weight and yet provide the necessary buffer zone between the exposed surface of the enclosure and the occupant using the same.

Accordingly, principal objects of the invention are to provide a new and useful radiation protective enclosure wherein fluid buifer zones are supplied in annular sectors about the occupancy region thereof, wherein water supply and air circulation is enabled through such buffer zone or compartments, where iiuids such as compressed air and water may be used not only for the above purposes but also to support the interior structure of the enclosure within and spaced from the outer wall thereof, wherein suitable sanitary facilities are provided in a convenient manner, and wherein the structure may be rendered collapsible in a manner such that the same may be--packaged about its self-contained sanitary receptacle, for example. n

The features of the present invention which are believed to be novel are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. The present invention, both as to its organization and manner of operation, together with further objects and advantages thereof, may best be understood by reference to the following description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIGURE l is a side elevation of the radiation protective enclosure of the present invention when the same is erected for use. The flexible, elongate ties are shown in fragmentary view, and the various partitions of the enclosure are shown in dotted lines.

FIGURE 2 is a longitudinally taken, vertical section of the structure of FIGURE 1, with certain partitions thereof being illustrated in dotted lines.

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged detail of a portion of the air circulation fan mechanism and is taken along the arcuate line 3--3 in FIGURE 2.

FIGURE 4, taken along an arcuate line 4--4 in FIG- URE 2, is an enlarged detail of a representative air valve which may be used at one or more places in the construction of the enclosure.

FIGURE 5 is a view taken along the line 5-5 in FIG- URE 2 and illustrates the manner in which access is ob- F"ice tained to the interior of the radiation protection enclosure.

FIGURE 6 is an elevation of the structure of FIGURES 1, 2 and 5 when the same is collapsed and packaged for storage.

FIGURE 7 is a bottom plan view of a waste receptacle, shown in elevation in FIGURE 2, which may be used with the invention.

FIGURE 8 is a vertical section taken along the line 8 8 in FIGURE 7 of the waste receptacle used.

In FIGURE 1 the radiation protective enclosure 10 is shown to include a hollow outer member 11, liexible elongate tie means 12 (shown broken away for convenience of illustration), liquid inlet valve meansv 13, air escape valve 14, air needle valves 15, plus other structure hereinafter to be explained.

Reference to FIGURE 2 illustrates that the hollow outer member L1 circumscribes and is radially spaced from the hollow inner member 16, 4the latte-r supplying and defining occupation space l17 for one or more individuals. Secured to the inner wall of hollow inner member 18 may Ibe one or more storage compartments, pockets or the like 18. The construction of members -18 mayV take the form of releasably closable bags and are strictly conventional in form.

Disposed at the opposite ends, 19 and 20, of hollow inner member 16 are -lirst and second structures 21 and 22, respectively, which respectively 'dei-ine radiation insulating or Ibutfer cavities. The structure 21 can be adapted for the containment of compressed air, if desired, by the inclusion of its `associated needle valve means 15. Since 'access lis needed into the interior at 17 of hollow inner member 16, the second structure 22 preferably comprises a Ipair of partitions 23 `and 24 which are mutually spaced `apart as shown in FIGURE 2 `and which also individually include closed, openable Zipper means 25 and 26, respectively. 'Ille zipper means 25 :and 26 preferably assume `a doubled back path as shown in FIGURE 5 so that by unzipping the partitions 23 and 24, convenient access openings through the two partitions may be obtai-ned to the occupancy space at @17.

Spaced, transverse partition rings 27, 28, `2.9 and 30 support the hollow inner member =16 interiorly of and spaced from hollow outer member '1'1. Additionally, these partitions, in conjunction with hollow inner and youter members .16 and 1'1, form annular fluid compartments 31, 32, and 33. A greater or less number of fluid compartments than that illustrated may be employed,` of course. The weight of 1the occupants, and size and cost considerations will dict-ate the number of partition rings and annular liuid compartments to be employed.

The iluid compartments may be `adapted for either compressed lair, as at 31 and 33, or a liquid such as water as shown at 32.

For a fluid compartment 32, there will be provided an exterior, Liq-uid valve means `13 for introducing liquid such as water into compartment 32 and also an interior' 1y disposed valve l314 by which water can be drawn ot the water supply at '35 within compartment 32. 'and used for drinking or other purposes within the enclosure. It will also be convenient Ito supply a drainage valve of 36 and an air 'bleeder valve 114, the former for the purpose of drainage and the latter for the purpose of conducting out any -air present within compartment 32 while water or liquid is introduced through valve 13 to pre-lill the cornpartment 32. v

In the case of compartments 31 and 33, lthe Vsame will merely be supplied with needle or other air valves 15, the

conventional construction being shown in FIGURE 4,

for containment of compressed air introduced under pressure. It will be noted that the lair within compartments 31, '33, and within structure 21 serves not only to provide an air buifer zone for radiation but also serves to support very firmly the hollow inner member 16 within the hollow outer member 11.

Air circulation means is also supplied to the enclosure. This takes the form of a conventionalexhaust fan 39, having a conventionally journalled fan blade member 40, shaft 41. and crank 42, and alsoair intake filter unit 43, of standard design, the pipe inlet 44 of which is disposedithrough apertures 45 and 46 so that the same may communicate to the interior 17 of the enclosed structure. Correspondingly, apertures 47 and 48 are for the purpose of mountingthe exhaust fan structure 39 so that air communication willproceed throughthe filter at 43 into the enclosure (at 17 within hollowinner member 16) and out theports 48 of` exhaust fan unit 39 to the outside atmosphere.

Asshown in FIGURE 2, an annular wall or partition 52, joins apertures 53 and 54 of hollow inner and outer members 16 and 11, respectively, so as to provide sealing wall for the introduction of receptacle 55 within aperture 56', the latter offering communication between occupancy space 17 and the exterior. The ground of course may be dug away at 57 for the introduction of waste material from receptacle 55.

Receptacle 55 comprises a pair of cans, an outer can 56- and an inner can S7, with the outer can preferably being provided with a tiange 58` which engages the interior member 16 when the waste receptacle is disposed in` proper position.

The inner can 57 is likewise preferably supplied with a bail 59 which. may be used both for lifting the inner canout of the outer can and also for rotating the inner can 5,7'within outer can 56.- A lid 60 may be hinged at 61l to outer can 56 as shown. The bottoms 62 and 63 of inner and outer can 56 and 57, respectively, have openings 64' and 65 which are disposed off-center as shown in FIGURE 7 so that when the inner can is rotating with respect` to the outer can, there will be a gradual registry ofboth of the cans bottom apertures and, conversely, a gradualwithdrawal thereof so that the container may be closed at the bottom. In this manner, the inner and outer cans, when their apertures are out of registry, serve to reoeive waste. Subsequently, and beforeV the lid 60 is placed down, the inner canrnay be rotated so that the two apertures 64 and 65 come into registry so that the contents of the inner can S7 will drop out. As shown in FIGURE 8 the bottom of inner can 57, together with the general wall contour thereof, may be such that substantially no waste material will be left in the inner can 57 once the waste material is emptied. Finally, upon again rotationally displacing the inner can 57 with respect to outer can 56, the. bottom becomes sealed (by the non-registry of the bottom apertures of both cans) so that undesired odors willbe kept from being communicated into the enclosure.

Where the structure as. above described is fabricated from resilient rubber, then the same may be collapsed, upon the release of air and fluid therefrom, and wrapped around the waste receptacle 55 so as to form a convenient package as shown in FIGURE 6 ready for storage. In such event the fiexible elongate ties 12 will be used to secure the packaged enclosure.

While particular embodiments of the present invention have been shown and described, it will be obvious to those skilled'in the ar-t that changes and modifications may be made without departing from this invention in its broader aspects and, therefore, the aim in the appended claims is to cover all such changes and modifications as fall in the true spirit and scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. A radiation protective enclosure including, in combination, a hollow inner member having opposite ends and providing interiorly thereof human occupancy space, a hollow outer member circumscribing said hollow inner member and radially spaced therefrom, means for securing said inner member to said outer member in mutually 4 spaced relationship, first structure defining a radiation insulating cavity disposed over one end of said hollow inner member, and second structure defining a radiation insulating cavity disposed over the remaining end of said hollow inner member, said second structure being provided with closed, openable means for gaining access from without said hollow outer member to the occupancy space within said hollow inner member, and wherein said 'second structure is provided with a pair of spaced partitions each having zipper means, as said closed, openable means, for opening said partitions.

2. A radiation protective enclosure including, in combination, a hollow inner member having opposite ends and providing interiorly thereof human occupancy space, a hollow outer member circumscribing said hollow inner member andradially spaced therefrom, means for securing said inner member to said outer member in mutually spaced relationship, first structure defining a radiation insulating cavity disposed over one end of said hollow inner member, and second structure defining a radiation insulating cavity disposed over the remaining end of said hollow inner member, said second structure being provided with closed, openable means for gaining access from without said hollow outer member to the occupancy space within said hollow inner member, and wherein said securing means comprises spaced, transverse partition rings disposed between said hollow, inner and outer members and defining, with said inner and outer members, annular uid compartments.

3. A radiation protective enclosure including, in combination, a hollow inner member having opposite ends and providinginteriorly thereof human occupancy space, a hollow outer member circumscribing said hollow inner member and radially spaced therefrom, means for securing said inner member to said outer member in mutually spaced relationship, first structure defining a radiation insulating cavity disposed over one end of said hollow inner member, and second structure defining a radiation insulating cavity disposed over the remaining end of said hollow inner member, said second structure being provided with closed, openable means for gaining access from without said hollow outer member to the occupancy space within said hollow inner member, and wherein said inner and outer membersare provided with aligned apertures, said structure being provided'with a sealing partition sealingly afiixed to said inner and outer members about said apertures to form a tubular, radial aperture communicating from without said hollow outer member to within said hollow` inner member, and wherein said enclosure is provided with a waste receptacle having a fiange engaging said hollow inner member, said receptacle being disposed within said tubular radial aperture.

4. A radiation protective enclosure including, in combination, a hollow inner member having opposite ends and providing interiorly thereof human occupancy space, a hollow outer member circumscribing said hollow inner member and radially spacedtherefrom, means for securing said inner member to said outer member in mutually spaced relationship, first structure defining a radiation insulating cavity disposed over one end of said hollow inner member, and second structure dening a radiation insulating cavity disposed over the remaining end of said hollow inner member, said second structure being ptovided with closed, openable means for gaining access from without said hollow outer member to the occupancy within said hollow inner member, and wherein the same is collapsible and is provided with flexible, elongated means for securing said enclosure in storable, packaged form and, alternatively, for securing said enclosure when erected to fixedobjects such as stakes.

5. Structure according to claim 2 wherein said outer member is provided with air valve means inwardly disposed between adjaccnt ones of said partition rings to communicate with one of said fluid compartments which is to constitute a compressed air chamber.

6. Structure according to claim 2 wherein said inner and outer members are each provided with respective liquid valve means communicating with a respective one of the annular fluid chambers for accommodating the pre-lling of a respective one of said fluid chambers with a desired liquid such as water and for providing means for withdrawing said liquid from said fluid chamber from within said Occupancy space disposed interiorly of said hollow inner member.

7. Structure according to claim 3 wherein said waste receptacle comprises a pair of cans, one inside the other, each can having a bottom proximate to each other, said can bottoms having mutually, seiectably alignable apertures upon the rotation of one can with respect to the remaining can.

8. Structure according to claim 7 wherein one of said cans is provided with a lid.

References @iisd in the iile of this patent UNTED STATES PilffErir Barker Jan. 14, 1958 Dimond July 21, 1959 OTHER REFERENCES

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2819724 *Sep 16, 1952Jan 14, 1958Aviat Clothing Company IncInflatable tent
US2895490 *May 2, 1957Jul 21, 1959Dimond Merill RInflatable tents
Referenced by
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US3227061 *May 13, 1963Jan 4, 1966Julian H SwayzeUnderground building
US5331991 *Oct 8, 1992Jul 26, 1994Ab VentilatorverkenVentilation method and means for the same
US5749181 *Apr 17, 1996May 12, 1998Bauman; Michael JamesUnderground emergency shelter system
US6321764Aug 24, 1999Nov 27, 2001Iit Research InstituteCollapsible isolation apparatus
US6461290Sep 12, 2000Oct 8, 2002Iit Research InstituteCollapsible isolation apparatus
US8474215 *Aug 31, 2012Jul 2, 2013Dirk DeRoseLow-cost redeployable protective shelter
US8955262 *Jan 25, 2013Feb 17, 2015Keith ThompsonAboveground safety shelter
US9038328Sep 10, 2014May 26, 2015Keith ThompsonAboveground safety shelter
US20040177447 *Mar 10, 2003Sep 16, 2004Love Tommy L.System for isolating a patient from a surrounding environment
Classifications
U.S. Classification109/1.00S, 135/87, 135/93, 976/DIG.336
International ClassificationG21F3/02, E04H9/10, E04H9/04, G21F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04H9/10, G21F3/02
European ClassificationG21F3/02, E04H9/10