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Publication numberUS3118559 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 21, 1964
Filing dateDec 10, 1958
Priority dateDec 10, 1958
Publication numberUS 3118559 A, US 3118559A, US-A-3118559, US3118559 A, US3118559A
InventorsJr Henry C Stricker
Original AssigneeHighway Trailer Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container
US 3118559 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1964 H. c. STRICKER, JR

CONTAINER 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Dec. 10, 1958 INVENTOR. H (3. $772 10 K5 KJ' Jan. 21, 1964 H. c. STRICKER, JR

CONTAINER 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. 10, 1958 INVENTOR. C. 57'? IC KER 7 United States Patent 3,118,559 (IQNTAENER Henry C. Striclrer, 3L, Edgerton, Win, assignor, by inesne assignments, to Highway Trailer industries, inc Edgerton, Wis, a corporation of Delaware Filed Dec. lb, 195%, Eer. No. 779,442 4 Claims. (ill. 22--9) This invention relates to containers, and more particularly to containers which are often described as shipping or warehousemans containers.

Containers of the class to which this invention relates, are most commonly used for shipment of goods overseas, and as such are returned and re-usable for subsequent shipment. Such containers often are intended to enclose and keep in usable condition products which are serniperishable and often times such products as are adversely affected by moisture.

As a particular example of products which are shipped in containers of the class described, it may be noted that coffee beans are often handled in this manner, the beans being placed in bags and the bags in turn in metal containers which are usually of light metal such as aluminum or the like for the obvious reasons of weight saving purposes.

f /hen containers of metal are used, these being generally more easily reinforced and thus subject to more frequent handling with less damage, condensation ithin the container often develops by reason of the change in climate to which the containers are subjected in srdprnent from countries such as South America to the United States. Gbviously condensation promotes certain fun-gas growth which is damaging to the products and desirably necessarily eliminated as much as possible.

The present invention is, generally speaking, directed to the particular phase of containers which relates to the development of condensation therein and is intended to eliminate damage caused by such condensation, so as to provide suitable dry containers, irrespective of the varying climates through which the containers may pass before reaching their destination to have the goods therewitlin removed therefrom.

h the foregoing general understanding set forth it is a principal object of this invention to provide a container which is suitable for shipment of goods therein, which container will eliminate the damage caused by condensation, permitting circulation into the container and substantially excluding condensation from developing therein in such a manner as to damage goods enclosed thereby.

It is a still further object of this invention to provide a container in which a double skin so to speak is availed of :to provide for the entrance of air and the egress of moist air from within the container to thereby cause the condensation to drain to the exterior of the container and prevent the same from passing into the interior thereof in such a manner as would damage the contents.

An even more particular object of the invention is to provide a container in which the inner and outer walls are arranged in conjunction with the structural members of the container to comprise a series of cells arranged in such a manner as to permit air circulation through the cells to the interior of the container and permit likewise the condensation developing to pass downwardly through the cells and out to the outside of the container.

Yet another object of the invention is to pr vide a suitable ceiling arrangement within the container whereby the said ceiling is perforated in such a manner as to permit the moisture laden vapor to pass outwardly therethrough and if condensation takes place on the under side of the top or roof of the container said condensation in dripping downwardly will pass downwardly toward the "ice sides and into the cellular construction of the sides and hence downwardly and outwardly from the container.

Another important object of the invention, is to provide for what may be termed drainage and breather units arranged in the wall construction in such a manner as to receive condensation passing downwardly between the inner and outer walls and cause said condensation to be directed outwardly of the container entirely through suitable openings provided in the outer wall therefor.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a container in which the ceiling construction is perforated as set forth hereinbefore, the perforations having lip-s therearound extending upwardly from the upper side of the ceiling whereby moisture running down over the surface or" the upper side of the ceiling will be prevented from passing back into the perforations and more particularly be directed toward suitable drainage and breather units at the lower most portions of the container so as to be removed from the container by gravity.

Other and further objects of the invention will be understood rom a consideration of the specification appended hereto and shown in the drawings wherein:

FZGURE 1 is a perspective View of a container embodying the invention hereof, certain elements being broken away to more particularly illustrate the construction of the container.

FIGURE 2 is an end elevation in section of the container shown in FIGURE 1 likewise further illustrating further details of construction.

FEGURE 3 is a somewhat enlarged fragmentary sectional view showing the manner of connecting the ceiling with the roof joists.

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary sectional view of one part of the connection of the ceiling and inner wall of the container.

5 is a somewhat enlarged fragmentary sectional view showing the relation of the drainage and breather units With the wall construction.

Pl -URE 6 is a perspective view showing a drainage and breather unit.

FIGURE 7 is a side view illustrating the said drainage and breather unit in somewhat enlarged detail.

Turning now to a consideration of the drawings, the container hereof which has been previously suggested is of the so-oalled warehousenrans type, is shown in FEGURE l in perspective as including th top 1, sides 2 and 3, the front side being designated 4. The rear side in this particular instance is formed by a pair of doors 5 and 6 which are suitably hingedly connected at 7 for example to the sides 2 and 3, said doors being swingable and perrnitting access to the interior of the container. As will be probably understood, the containers of this nature are of rather large size and facilitate the placement therein of quantities of foods such as coffee beans by hand trucks or other means, the containers being of such a size as to permit access by individuals as necessary. The doors 5 and 6 may be provided with any suitable latch means designated 8 and not otherwise shown in detail. The

door construction is largely identical to the side con- 1 struction and the construction of the side such as f. illustrates the similarity, although the side 3 wih be described in particular detail with reference to FIGURE 2 and subsequent figures.

The sides of the container are constructed of an outer skin such as 9 wMch in many containers and in this one as an example maybe of aluminum and thus a smooth member, constituting an aluminum wall extending from a lowermost position at a skid member 19 to a top rail 11.

The inner wall denoted 12 is as shown in the FIGURE 5 disclosure constructed of plywood for example indicated at 13 to which is secured as by bonding, a metallic sheath, in this instance preferably aluminum, denoted 14. The

interior of the entire container is therefore wooden as far as the sides are concerned at least that in so far as the portion which is exposed to view.

The aluminum sheath plywood combination 13 and 14, is in turn suitably fastened to vertically extending stakes denoted 15 which are likewise preferably of aluminum and of hat-shape in cross section or any other preferred shape as will be readily understood by those skilled in the art, the inner wall 12 being spaced from said stakes 15 by means of a wood strip such as indicated in FIGURE 4 at 16, the stakes being commonly secured as by riveting at 17 to the elements previously described including the wood strips 16 and the inner wall 12.

Extending transversely from the upper rail 11 are the roof joists 18 which roof joists support a sheet aluminum roof covering 19 thereon and at their central portion are provided with a ridge pole shown in enlarged detail in FIGURE 3 at 2%, the ridge pole being secured to the joists by means of the rivets such as 21.

The ridge pole 2% is in turn provided with a pair of grooves such as 22, which in turn support the inner edges of sheathed plywood sheets such as comprise the inner walls 12, the plywood sheet being indicated at 23 and the metallic sheath being denoted 24.

The ceiling is therefore arranged as shown in the F1"- URE 2 disclosure so that it slopes outwardly from the ridge pole to the outer edges and is supported by suitable short angle members denoted 25 in turn suitably riveted at 2d to the stakes 15 whereby the outer edges of the ceiling sheets are supported on the upper edges of the inner walls 12 additionally having the ribbons 28 afiixed thereto to provide greater bearing for the outer edges of the ceiling sheets.

The ceiling sheets of the ceiling itself are arranged so as to be perforated in a manner such as is indicated in detail in FIGURE 3, suitable openings in the ceiling being provided, about one per square foot, and consisting of a half inch hole for example denoted 3G in the wood 23 of the ceiling. The metallic sheath portion is extended to form a lip such as 31 around each hole, the opening therein being somewhat smaller than the opening 39 for purposes which will be subsequently set forth. All of the perforations in the ceiling are of this nature and are provided in this manner so that moisture laden air in passing from the interior of the container upwardly through the openings 36 will condense on the under side of the roof or top 19, subsequently drop off the roof, and run downwardly over the ceiling to the cells provided by the inner and outer walls previously described in combination with the stakes as indicated.

When the moisture reaches the cells, and passes downwardly therein, it will be collected at the bottom of each cell by a drainage and breather unit generally denoted 32, and more particularly shown in FIGURE 6 as comprising a generally rectilinear member which may be formed of wood or similar material having in its upper surface a generally V-shaped groove denoted 33. The apex of such V-shaped groove at 34- causes moisture to flow into suitable vertically extending openings 65' in the body of the breather unit 32 and thence downwardly to a slot which may likewise be V-shaped in cross section as indicated at 36 in FIGURE 5. The slot 36 is arranged as shown in FIGURE 6 so that the end sections 37 and 33 are somewhat higher than the central portion 39. Thus moisture passing through the vertically extending openings 35 will collect at the juncture of the sections at 39.

The breather units 32 now being described are located in the bottoms of the cells about as indicated in FIG- URE 1 with the portions of each of the slots 36 at 39 opposite an opening such as 49, which opening 49 is in the outer wall 9 of the container. Thereby when moisture collects in the groove 33 and passes downwardly through the openings 35, thence into the slot 36, it will in turn pass outwardly through the opening 40 md thus out of the container completely. The breather and drainage units 32 are located about as shown in FIGURE 2 and FIGURE 5 in relation to the container itself so that these units are below the floor 42 and thus just above the skid members 1% and thereby are in the lowest place possible with relation to the container as a whole.

The floor 4 2 may be prefenably a hard wood floor and supported on suitable joists such as 43 fastened in any preferred manner to the rest of the container so as to completely enclose same and provide added or necessary rigidity thereby.

It will of course be understood that a drainage and breather unit will be provided at the bottom of each of the cells or between the stakes 15' as the case may be, the doors 5 and 6 being similarly arranged to provide for drainage of moisture collecting therein.

The foregoing description of the novel container hereof, discloses the unique manner in which moisture is prevented from causing harm within the container, since condensation which may take place will take place between the walls and between ceiling and roof or top as the case may be and moisture developed thereby will pass downwardly and out of the container so as not to damage goods therewithin. The drainage and breather units are so arranged as to collect the moisture and the use of metallic sheaths and wooden inner walls is such as to prevent the moisture from damaging the walls and yet availing of the insulating protective qualities of the wood with which the same is associated.

I claim:

1. In container construction of the class described, in combination, a floor assembly including a floor member, spaced inner and outer walls constituting sides extending upwardly from said assembly, drainage and breather units for said sides located below the floor member between the walls and providing for drainage of condensation formed between the walls outwardly from the walls and admission of air between the walls, a top fastened at least to the outer walls, a ceiling spaced from the top, spanning the space between the inner walls and arranged to cause condensation formed thereon to be directed to the space between the walls, the space between the walls being divided into vertically extending cells, said drainage and breather unit being located at the lowest position in each of said cells, and the ceiling is provided with a series of perforations therein whereby the passage of air into and out of the container through such perforations between the top and ceiling, to the cells mentioned and into and out of the units is facilitated, said units providing for drainage as stated,

said inner wall and ceiling being formed of metal sheathed wood-like material, the metal sheath being arranged to face outwardly, and the perforations in the ceiling including openings in which the portions of the openings extending through the metal sheath are bent upwardly to form lips therearound.

2. In container construction of the class described, in combination, a floor assembly including a floor member, spaced inner and outer walls constituting sides extending upwardly from said assembly, drainage and breather units for said sides located below the floor member between the walls and providing for drainage of condensation formed between the walls outwardly from the walls and admission of air between the walls, a top fastened at least to the outer walls, a ceiling spaced from the top, spanning the space between the inner walls and arranged to cause condensation formed thereon to be directed to the space between the walls, the space be tween the walls being divided into vertically extending cells, said drainage and breather unit being located at the lowest position in each of said cells, and the ceiling is provided with a series of perforations therein whereby the passage of air into and out of the container through such perforations between the top and ceiling, to the cells mentioned and into and out of the units is facilitated, said units providing for drainage as stated, the drainage and breather units each comprising a body having a trough-like upper portion, a slot extending from one side into the body, said slot being located in alignment with an opening in the outer wall for each cell, and means to connect the trough-like upper portion with the slot aforesaid to provide a moisture passage, whereby condensation coliected in said trough-hire portion will pass to the slot and thence to an opening in the outer wall for the drainage described.

3. In portable container construction of the class described, in combination, spaced inner and outer walls between which condensation is formed, said inner and outer walls constituting a side, and several sides being provided, a top extends between the sides, a ceiling is spaced from the top and spans the space between the sides, means positioned in the space between said walls comprising drainage and breather units in which condensation is collected and from which the same is directed by means provided through the outer wall, said ceiling having perforations therein, in which the portions adjacent the openings are bent upwardly to form lips therearound, the ceiling being arranged to cause condensation formed thereon to pass into the space between the walls and thence to the breather units aforesaid.

4. In portable container construction of the class described, in combination, spaced inner and outer walls between which condensation is formed, and means positioned in the space between said walls comprising drainage and breather units, said drainage and breather units in turn each comprising a body having a trough-like upper pontion, a slot extending from one side into the body, said slot being located in alignment with an opening in the outer wall and means to connect the trough-like upper portion with the slot aforesaid to provide a moisture passage whereby condensation collected in said trough-like portion will pass to the slot and thence to an opening in the outer wall for the drainage described.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 289,833 Hartman Dec. 11, 1883 1,705,928 Lambert Mar. 19, 1929 2,019,194 Munters Oct. 29, 1935 2,150,181 Munters Mar. 14, 1939 2,192,933 Saborsky Mar. 12, 1940 2,553,881 Suttles May 22, 1951 2,645,824 Titsworth July 21, 1953 2,804,657 Munters Sept. 3, 1957 FOREIGN PATENTS 722,688 France Jan. 4, 1932

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US289833 *Mar 8, 1883Dec 11, 1883 Refrigerator
US1705928 *May 20, 1927Mar 19, 1929Heintz Mfg CoMethod of and apparatus for preventing the condensation of moisture on the exterior surface of refrigerator cabinets
US2019194 *Jan 25, 1934Oct 29, 1935Georg Munters CarlInsulation, particularly for refrigerators or the like
US2150181 *Mar 31, 1934Mar 14, 1939Termisk Isolation AbRefrigeration
US2192933 *Jun 30, 1937Mar 12, 1940Owens Corning Fiberglass CorpHeat insulation
US2553881 *Jan 15, 1948May 22, 1951Omar SuttlesVentilating system for house trailers
US2645824 *Sep 13, 1949Jul 21, 1953Titsworth Edwin JVentilated wall
US2804657 *Sep 30, 1952Sep 3, 1957Munters Carl GeorgHeat insulated walls of cold-storage rooms
FR722688A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3319348 *Feb 1, 1965May 16, 1967Grace W R & CoApparatus and method for transporting warm, moisture laden goods
US3853367 *Feb 9, 1972Dec 10, 1974Hughes Aircraft CoCabinet
US4351230 *Apr 20, 1981Sep 28, 1982Sea-Land Service, Inc.Self-venting cargo container
US4456142 *Dec 8, 1981Jun 26, 1984Acmil Plastic Products Pty. Ltd.Container
US4674665 *Aug 29, 1986Jun 23, 1987Lrv CorporationVehicle tool box with peripheral drain means
US5211030 *Aug 23, 1991May 18, 1993Follett CorporationApparatus for storing and dispensing ice
US5271493 *Sep 15, 1992Dec 21, 1993Hall William YTank vault
US5601204 *Jun 5, 1992Feb 11, 1997Hall; William Y.Tank vault with sealed liner
US6286707Sep 30, 1994Sep 11, 2001William Y. HallContainer for above-ground storage
US6422413Nov 30, 1994Jul 23, 2002William Y. HallTank vault
US7624885 *Mar 28, 2005Dec 1, 2009WEW Westerwälder Eisenwerk GmbHContainer arrangement
DE1586921B1 *Oct 9, 1967Feb 3, 1972Spitzer Kg Ludwig SenQuaderfoermiger,langgestreckter und stapelbarer Grossbehaelter
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/62.18, 454/185, 220/676, 220/1.5, 220/DIG.600
International ClassificationB65D88/74
Cooperative ClassificationY10S220/06, B65D88/741, B65D88/747
European ClassificationB65D88/74J, B65D88/74B