Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3119391 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 28, 1964
Filing dateJul 9, 1962
Priority dateJul 9, 1962
Publication numberUS 3119391 A, US 3119391A, US-A-3119391, US3119391 A, US3119391A
InventorsHarrison Robert R
Original AssigneeBaxter Laboratories Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Non-coring needle
US 3119391 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 28, 1964 R. R. HARRISON 3,119,391

NON-CORING NEEDLE Filed July 9, 1962 INVENTOR. ROBERT R. HARRISON ATTORNEY United States Patent The present invention relates to a novel needle device for puncturing a variety of materials, more particularly it relates to a needle type device for use in the field of parenteral fluid administration.

In the field of parenteral fluid administration the bottles of parenteral fluid, primarily those of blood, are closed with a re-sealable rubber stopper. This stopper is generally provided with an integral rubber diaphragm. In the past there has frequently been a problem in connecting fluid administration sets to said bottles. This problem has been the so-called coring of the stopper by the connector of said administration sets. Coring occurs when the connector is forced through the stopper and punches or cuts and dislodges small particles of rubher from the stopper and into the bottle of solution. The presence of such particles in the parenteral solution is obviously undesirable and actually dangerous.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a needle-like device which eliminates coring of the rubber stopper.

It is further an object to provide a novel piercing connector which requires a minimum of pressure to pierce the conventional rubber stopper.

It is still further an object of the present invention to provide a piercing connector which results in a superior re-sealing of the stopper after use.

It is still further an object to provide a superior needlelike piercing device which may be used advantageously in a wide variety of materials such as rubber, skin, plastic or the like.

The above objects, and still further objects, are obtained by the exercise of the present invention. The accomplishment of these objects will become more apparent as the specification proceeds.

In the drawings, FIGURE 1 is a side elevation of the connector embodying the present invention.

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary sectional view along line 22 of FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged view of the piercing point of the connector of FIGURE 1.

In the drawing is seen an embodiment of the present invention, in which the numeral 19 represents the connector generally. The connector 16 is comprised of a general piercing end 11 provided with a point 12, and a bevel cut 13, a tapered tubular shank 14, a flange-like manipulating surface 15, and a connecting section 16. A passageway or lumen 17 extends the length of said plastic connector providing a means of continuous flow from the piercing end 11, through the tubular shank 14 and the connector 16.

The piercing end 11 is formed generally by the bevel cut portion 13, the open section of which is divided into the orifices 13A and 13B by a bridge 18. The bridge 18 extends from the tip 12 to the tubular shank 14. It joins the tip 12 at an angle larger than that of the bevel cut 13 and is provided with an angular external section 19. It is this angular blade-like section 19 which is believed to provide the superior stopper piercing action of the present connector. The blade-like section 19 as it pierces the rubber stopper slits the rubber diaphragm, and gently spreads the material of said diaphragm without coring. The tubular portion 14 of the connector may thus be inserted through said connector with a minimum of force.

In the preferred form of the present invention the connector 10 is approximately 2% inches long and is molded of a rigid plastic material such as nylon, styrene, acrylic resins, or the like. As seen in FIGURE 3 the piercing end 11 is formed generally by the bevel cut-like portion 13 (angle 30) and the bridge section 18. The bladelike angular external portion 19 of said bridge section rises sharply (about 45) from the tip 12 of said connector to a level about equal to that of the lumen of the passageway 17, and then proceeds generally along a less angular path to join the main portion of the connector. The orifices 13A and 13B formed by the bevel cut 13 and the bridge 18 are relatively oval in shape and measure .35 6 inch long and .030 inch wide.

The slotted connector of the present invention in addition to being non-coring, provides still further benefits when used in the administration of blood. The onfices 13A and 13B and the bridge 18 combine to provide an effective straining action which blocks, or prevents, the passage of large blood clots and strands of fibrin into the passageway 17. This straining action has been found to be doubly valuable when the connector is used in conjunction with the administration of blood from a plastic container which utilizes a metal bead valve. In such cases the strainer also prevents the metal bead from blocking the passageway 17 and thus obstructing flow through the administration set to the recipient.

It will be readily understood that a wide variety of of modifications and changes may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention.

While for purposes of illustration the connector has been shown as a single item it will be readily appreciated that said connector could be incorporated in a structure comprising an integral drip tube and filter chamber.

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are:

1. A needle-like piercing device comprising a tapered tubular shaft provided with a passageway extending therethrough, manipulating means adjacent one end of said shaft and, piercing means adjacent the other end of said shaft, said piercing means comprising a solid piercing tip at the other end of said shaft, a bevel-like cut portion immediately adjacent said tip, an integral relatively narrow externally angular bridge extending from said solid tip against the bevel-like cut portion to the uncut portion of the tubular shaft, said bridge dividing the portion of the passageway exposed by said bevellike portion into two parts, the main passageway of said tubular shaft being relatively unobstructed by said bridge.

2. A needle-like piercing device comprising a tubular shaft provided with a passageway extending therethrough, manipulating means adjacent one end of said shaft and, piercing means adjacent the other end of said shaft, said piercing means comprising a solid piercing tip at the other end of said shaft, a bevel-like cut portion imme- 3 4 diateiy adjacent said tip, an integral relatively narrow, an integral externally angular bridge extending from. said externally angular bridge extending from said solid tip solid tip to the main portion of the tubular shaft, said across the bevel-like cut portion to the uncut portion of bridge dividing the portion of the passageway exposed the tubular shaft, said bridge dividing the portion of the by said bevel-like open portion into two parts. passageway exposed to said bevel-like cut into two parts. 5

3. A needle-like piercing device comprising a tubular References Quad m the file of this patent shaft provided with a passageway extending therethrough, UNITED STATES PATENTS manipulating means adjacent one end of said shaft and, 2,746,455 Abel May 22, 1956 a solid piercing tip adjacent the other end of said shaft, 2,958,545 Stelzer Nov. 1, 1960 a bevel-like open portion immediately adjacent said tip, 10 2,989,053 Hamilton June 20, 1961

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2746455 *May 12, 1954May 22, 1956Abbott LabVenoclysis equipment
US2958545 *Sep 15, 1958Nov 1, 1960Weatherhead CoRupturable union device
US2989053 *Jan 17, 1956Jun 20, 1961Baxter Don IncHypodermic needle
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3540112 *Jan 18, 1967Nov 17, 1970Knox Lab IncMethod for manufacturing a hypodermic needle
US3584624 *Feb 24, 1969Jun 15, 1971Ciutiis Vincent L DeFlexible intravenous catheter provided with cutting tip means
US3633580 *Sep 29, 1969Jan 11, 1972Knox Lab IncHypodermic needle
US3788320 *Feb 25, 1972Jan 29, 1974Kendall & CoSpinal needle
US4585446 *Mar 16, 1984Apr 29, 1986Joseph KempfDialysis needle
US4753641 *Sep 10, 1987Jun 28, 1988Vaslow Dale FEmergency medical needle
US4826492 *Jan 9, 1987May 2, 1989Hospal Ltd.Medical probe
US5169602 *Mar 7, 1990Dec 8, 1992Beckman Instruments, Inc.Resealable conduit and method
US5354537 *Apr 27, 1992Oct 11, 1994Akzo N.V.Needle
US5364387 *Aug 2, 1993Nov 15, 1994Becton, Dickinson And CompanyDrug access assembly for vials and ampules
US5632728 *Nov 28, 1994May 27, 1997Lincoln Diagnostics, Inc.Skin testing and vaccinating needles
US5709668 *Jun 6, 1995Jan 20, 1998Senetek PlcAutomatic medicament injector employing non-coring needle
US5820621 *Jul 29, 1997Oct 13, 1998Becton, Dickinson And CompanyFor accessing fluid from vials and ampoules
US5832971 *Jul 22, 1996Nov 10, 1998Becton, Dickinson And CompanyFluid transfer device for assessing fluid from vials and ampoules
US5931820 *Dec 27, 1994Aug 3, 1999The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Air ForceWound and lavage irrigation connector apparatus and method for using
US6726649May 9, 2002Apr 27, 2004Becton, Dickinson And CompanyMedical needle assemblies
US6730059May 9, 2002May 4, 2004Becton, Dickinson And CompanyMedical needle assemblies
US6921387May 1, 2002Jul 26, 2005Mayo Foundation For Medical Education And ResearchVascular needle
US6936031Dec 12, 2001Aug 30, 2005Gambro Dasco S.P.A.Site for access to the inside of a channel, and corresponding cannula
US6945964 *Oct 14, 2003Sep 20, 2005Dianne L. HilderbrandHypodermic needle
US7645268Mar 25, 2004Jan 12, 2010Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Needles and methods of using same
US7740610Nov 5, 2007Jun 22, 2010Becton, Dickinson And CompanySingle-use syringe
US7776023Feb 3, 2009Aug 17, 2010Arkray, Inc.Method and implement for opening hole in soft material
US8540686Mar 2, 2005Sep 24, 2013Covidien AgBlunt tip vial access cannula
EP0158697A1 *Jun 26, 1984Oct 23, 1985Joseph KempfDialysis needle
EP2238998A1Apr 2, 2009Oct 13, 2010F. Hoffmann-La Roche AGCannula for piercing a septum of a cartridge and valve for the cannula
WO1993021975A1 *Apr 27, 1993Nov 11, 1993Akzo NvPiercing and sampling probe
WO2002087666A2 *May 1, 2002Nov 7, 2002Mayo FoundationVascular needle
WO2010121342A2 *Apr 15, 2010Oct 28, 2010Universidade Federal De PernambucoDouble-beveled needle for the lysis of microvaricose veins and telangiectasias
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/274, 604/411
International ClassificationA61M5/162, A61M5/32, A61M5/14
Cooperative ClassificationA61M5/3286, A61M2205/195, A61M5/162
European ClassificationA61M5/162