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Publication numberUS3119523 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 28, 1964
Filing dateNov 3, 1961
Priority dateNov 3, 1961
Publication numberUS 3119523 A, US 3119523A, US-A-3119523, US3119523 A, US3119523A
InventorsLloyd Jaffe
Original AssigneeSidney Grain Machinery Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electronic distributor control
US 3119523 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 28, 1964 L. JAFFE ELECTRONIC DISTRIBUTOR CONTROL 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 3, 1961 United States Patent 3,119,523 ELECTRONIC DISTRHBUTOR CONTRQL Lloyd .l'afie, Dayton, Ohio, assignor to Sidney Grain Machinery (10., Sidney, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Fiied Nov. 3, 1961, Ser. No. 150,053 19 Claims. (Cl. 22225) The present invention relates to a distributor and more particularly to an electronic control system for a distributor control to prowde accurate remote control of the distribution of bulk materials to any one of a plurality of outlet stations. Still more particularly, the present invention provides a distributor employing a rotatable spout adapted to receive grain, feed, chemicals or other bulk materials, in which an electrical remote motor con trol circuit is provided for controlling the presentation of the spout to any one of a plurality of outlet passages arrayed along the path of rotary motion of the spout.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a bulk material distributor which is adapted to displace a minimum of volume, to require a minimum of electrical power for its operation, to be more easily installed for service than presently available electrically powered distributors and which is fabricated from parts more easily secured and of less cost than the parts presently employed in such systems.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a distributor which reduces labor to a minimum, which does not injure the material being handled, and which greatly facilitates both the ease of handling and the time of handling of such material.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a remote electronic motor control for a rotary distributor which permits ease of selection of a particular distributor station.

It is another object of the present invention to provide an electronic remote control for a distributor in which indicator lamps are provided to indicate when the distributor is in motion and further when the distributor has ceased motion.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide a distributor employing a remote control unit which permits independent adjustment of the distributor relative to each of a plurality of selectable output stations.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide an electrical remote control unit for a distributor, which remote control unit permits the operator to determine the present position of the distributor when it is not in motion.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a rotary distributor in which various materials to be distributed may enter through one intake and then be discharged through any one of various predetermined outlet stations so that a single supply means may be employed to supply material to a large number of diiferent stations.

The above and still further objects, features and advantages of the present invention will become apparent upon consideration of the following detailed description of one specific embodiment thereof, especially when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a view in elevation of the distributor of the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a view in elevation of the transmission housing with the front cover removed;

FIGURE 3 is a view in elevation of the front panel of the control box; and

FIGURE 4 is a schematic electrical diagram of the motor control system.

Referring specifically to FIGURE 1 of the accompanying drawings, there is illustrated a distributor 1 having generally a diamond shape in vertical cross section and comprising a hollow member of revolution about its vertical axis. The top of the structure is flattened and is provided with an inlet 2 through which material may be supplied to the distributor 1. Positioned in the inlet there is a distributor spout 4 which is rotatable about the vertical axis of revolution of the distributor 1, and comprises a vertical portion 6 coaxial with the intake passage 2 and a lower conduit 7 extending downwardly and at an angle to the vertical axis of the distributor. A plurality of conduits having their open ends forming outlet ports 8 are disposed about the periphery of the distributor 1 in registry with the circle of travel of the lower end of the conduit 7 on the spout 4. Upon rotation of the spout 4, the lower end of the conduit 7 may be brought into registry with any one of the plurality of outlet ports 8. The number of these ports may be quite large, and in the system of the present invention, the maximum permissible number is determined by the diameter of the distributor 1 relative to the diameters of the individual outlet ports 8.

The spout 4 is supported on a shaft 9, the shaft 9 being rotated about its own vertical axis to produce movement of the spout through a conical surface. The shaft 9 is connected through a suitable coupling 11 to a shaft 12 which extends through a bearing 13 and a circular-tosquare converter housing 14 to a transmission box 16. The purpose of the geometric shape of the converter 14 is to provide a more equal weight distribution throughout the distributor. The housing 16 contains a motor 23 which, when energized, rotates the shaft 12 and therefore, the shaft 9 to cause the spout 4 to rotate to various locations in which it is in registration with a selected outlet port 8. Control of the motor 23 in the housing 16 is effected by a control box 17 connected to the housing 16 by means of a seven-wire cable 18.

Referring now specifically to FIGURE 2 of the accompanying drawings, the transmission housing 16 comprises an upper plate 15 through which the shaft 12 passes vertically. A bearing 20 is provided for sealing the opening for the shaft 12 so that the housing is maintained dust-proof and, when necessary, explosion-proof. This bearing also provides for the free rotation of the shaft 12 as does the bearing 13 and together with the bearing 13 assures the proper alignment of the shaft 12, shaft 9, and spout 4 in its registration with a selected outlet port 8. The upper plate 15 is secured to a bottom plate 19 on the geometrically shaped converter 14 as by bolts (not shown). Secured to the under side of the plate 15 there is a generally square housing 21 having a U-shaped vertical cross-section. A gasket 22 may be provided between the upper plate 15 and the housing 21 also for maintaining the interior of the housing dust-proof. Secured within the housing 16 there is an electric motor 23 having an output shaft 24 for driving a worm pinion 26. The worm pinion 26 drives a worm gear 27 mounted on the shaft 12. The worm gear 27 also drives a shaft 28 of a voltage divider 29 through a flexible bellows mechanism 31. The bellows mechanism 31 permits slight misalignment of the shaft 12 with the shaft 28 of the potentiometer, which misalignment may occur during rotation of the distributor.

The control box 17 is provided with an outlet selector switch operable by a selector knob 32 on the front panel of the box 17. A dial behind the cover of the control box 17 is marked to conform with the number of outlet ports 8. This dial is visible through the outlet indicator 37 and is rotated by the selector knob 32. Inside the cover of the control box 17 there is located a plurality of fine adjusting knobs 33 equal to the number of outlet ports for the distributor 1. These fine adjustments permit precise regulation of the position of the spout with respect to any given outlet port 8. The operation of these dea vices will be explained subsequently when explaining the operation of the circuit diagram of FIGURE 4.

A push-button 34 is also provided on the front panel of the box 17. This push-button being employed to start the operation of the distributor through operation of a switch 87, to be later described, after a particular station has been selected by manipulation of the knob 32. While the rotating distributing spout 4 is in motion, an IN MOTION indicator light 36 is illuminated, indicating that no flow of material should be started. While rotation is proceeding, an OUTLET indicator light 37 is illuminated and displays the same color as the IN MO- TION indicator light 36. When the desired outlet port 8 has been reached, a STOP indicator light 38 is illuminated and the IN MOTION indicator light 36 is turned oil. Also, the OUTLET indicator light 37 changes colors and displays the same color as the STOP indicator light 38. In accordance with features to be described subsequently, the STOP and OUTLET indicator lights remain on for approximately five seconds and then go out, indicating that power has been removed from the motor and material may be fed to the spout for discharge through the selector outlet port 8.

One further control is provided on the front panel of the control box 17. A push button 40 may be employed to locate the present position of the spout 4, if unknown. The button 40 is pushed with one hand and the position selector knob 32 is rotated. The pushing of the button 40 operates a switch 51, to be later described. When the knob 32 reaches a position corresponding to the present position of the spout, the STOPPED indicator light 38 and the OUTLET indicator light 37 are illuminated, thus providing a ready indication of position.

Referring now specifically to FIGURE 4 of the accompanying drawings, there is illustrated an electrical wiring diagram of the control mechanisms of the present invention. The circuitry within the control box 17 is contained within the dashed line box also designated 17 while the apparatus in the transmission housing 16 is illustrated as enclosed within a dashed line box, also hearing the reference numeral 16. The seven-conductor cable 18 connected between the boxes 17 and 16 is enclosed within a generally elliptical loop also designated by the reference numeral 18. Alternating current power is supplied to the box 17 over a pair of power leads 41 and a ground lead 42 is also provided. A lead 43 is connected to one of the leads 41 and through a fuse 44 of suitable rating to a further power lead 46. A pair of contacts 47 associated with an electro-magnetic relay 48 are connected in series between the lead 46 and a further lead 50. The lead 50 is connected through one set of contacts 49 of a double-pole, double-throw switch 51 actuated by the push-button 40, and thence through a resistor 52 to one terminal of a full wave rectifier circuit 53. The other input terminal of the rectifier circuit 53 is connected via a lead 54 to the other of the input leads 41.

One output terminal 56 of the rectifier circuit 53 is connected through a fuse 57 and thence through a current limiting resistor 58 to a power lead 59. The second output terminal 61 of the rectifier circuit 53 is connected to a negative return lead 62. The leads 59 and 62 are connected over two of the leads in the cable 18 to the transmission housing 16 and specifically to the field winding 63 of the shunt field DC. motor generally designated by the reference numeral 23. The motor 23 has an armature 66 having one terminal connected via a lead 67 and a lead of the cable 18 to a lead 68 in the control box 17. The other terminal of the armature 66 is connected through a damping resistor 69 and another lead of the cable 18 to a further lead 71 in the control box 17. The lead 68 is connected through a normally closed set of contacts 72 of a relay 73 to the negative return lead 62, and is also connected through a normally open set of contacts 74 of the relay 73 to the positive voltage lead 59. The lead 71 is connected through a set of normally closed contacts 76 of a relay 77 to the negative voltage lead 62 and also through a set of normally open contacts 78 of the relay 77 to the positive lead 59. These contacts therefore provide for reversible connections for the armature 66 so that the armature may be made to rotate in one or the other direction. Also, since the contacts 72 and 76 are normally closed, a short circuit is provided across the armature 66 of the motor 23 so as to provide for dynamic damping of the motor. The current through this circuit is limited by the resistor 69.

The coils of the relays 73 and 77 both have one terminal connected to the lead 54 and the other terminals of the coils are connected to stationary contacts 79 and 81, respectively, of a single-pole, double-throw reversing switch generally designated by the reference numeral 82 and having a movable arm 83.

Referring now again to the relay 48, one end of this winding of the relay is connected to the lead 54, while the other end of the winding of the relay is connected through a diode rectifier 84 to a stationary terminal 86 of a switch 87, which is manually operated by the pushbutton 34, as previously described. The push-button switch 34 has a bridging element adapted to complete an electrical circuit between the stationary contact 86 and a further stationary contact 88, which is connected to the lead 46. The relay 48 is energized upon the actuation of the push-button 34 to bridge contacts 86 and 38 and upon doing so closes its normally open contact 47. A holding circuit is provided for the relay 48 through a second set of its contacts 89 and alternatively, through parallel connected contacts 91 and 92 associated with relays 73 and 77, respectively. The parallel connected contacts 91 and 92 are connected in series with the contact 89 from the lead 46 and the lead between the stationary contact 86 of switch 34 to the diode 84. Upon the depression of the push-button switch 34, the contacts 89 of the relay are closed and, if the spout 4 is not in the position called for, the selector switch 82, one or the other of the contacts 91 or 92, as will be explained subsequently, is also closed. This provides a holding circuit for the relay which is broken only upon de-energization of the previously energized relay 73 or 77. A capacitor 93 is connected in shunt with the coil of the relay 43 and provides a five-second delay for maintaining the circuit energized after the spout 4 has been moved to its correct position.

Continuing with a description of the circuit diagram, 21 primary winding 94 of the transformer 96 is connected between the leads 46 and 54. The secondary winding 97 of the transformer 96 is connected across opposite terminals of a bridge rectifier circuit 98 which is employed to provide positive voltage on a lead 99 and negative voltage on a lead 101, which latter may be grounded. The lead 99 is connected through a filter circuit 162 toa positive voltage lead 103. Connected between the leads 163 and 161 there is a series resistive network comprising a first fixed resistor 164, resistors 166 through of potentiometers 116 through 125, respectively and thence through a second fixed resistor 16 to the lead 161. The potentiometers 116 through are provided with sliders 126 through 135, respectively, which are operated by the several adjusting knobs 33 and each of which is connected to a different stationary contact of a selector switch 136 having a movable arm 137. The movable arm 137 is operated by the knob 32 illustrated in FIG- URE 3 of the accompanying drawings. This arm 137 is electrically connected through a series circuit comprising a ballast lamp 140, a coil 133 of a relay 139 and a lead of cable 18 to a slider 141 of the voltage divider 29.

The relay 139 controls the movable arm 33 of the switch S2 and the ballast light is employed to provide a generally constant current to the coil 138 regardless of the voltage across the circuit within its operating range.

The voltage divider 29 includes a fixed resistor 142 connected via appropriate leads of cable 18 to the leads 101 and 103 in the housing 17. The slidable arm 141 of the voltage divider 29 is mechanically connected, as previously stated, to be driven by the armature 66 of the motor 23. As the voltage drops through the potentiometer assembly 116-125 and the resistance element 142 of the voltage divider 29 oppose each other, the circuit from the arm 137 of the selector switch 136 and the slidable arm 141 of the voltage divider will hereinafter be termed the bridge circuit. Completing the description of the circuit, lead 103 is connected through a series circuit comprising normally closed contacts 143 of relay 77, normally closed contacts 144 of relay 73, and green OUTLET indicator light 37 and green STOPPED light 38, connected in parallel to the lead 101. The junction of the contacts 143 and 144 is connected through a series circuit comprising normally open contacts 146 of relay 73 and through parallel connected red OUTLET indicator light 37 and red IN MOTION indicator light 36 to the lead 191. Also the lead 103 is connected through normally open contact 147 of the relay 77 to the junction of the normally open contact 146 and the lamps 36 and 37'. The lamps 37 and 37' are both viewed through the same aperture in the front panel of the control box 17 so as to provide for the aforementioned change in color of the outlet indicator.

In operation of the circuit, the push-button switch 34 is actuated to produce energization of the relay 48. The relay 4S closes its contacts 47 providing voltage on the lead 51 and through the normally closed contacts 49 of the switch 51 to the high voltage rectifier 53. The rectifier 53 develops a DC. voltage across the leads 59 and 62 which is supplied directly to the field 63 of the armature 66 of the motor 23. Depending upon the relative position of the movable arm 137 of the selector switch 136 and the movable arm 141 of the voltage divider 29, a voltage is or is not established across the ballast lamp 140 and the coil 138 of the relay 139, which are connected in series. Specifically, the arrangement of the resistors of the potentiometers 116 through 125 and their sliders 126 through 135, respectively and the resistors 142 of the voltage divider 29 and its slidable arm 141, provides a Wheatstone bridge circuit which, when the movable arm 137 and the slidable arm 141 are in voltage balance, no voltage is developed across the bridge circuit. However, if the selector knob 32 has been operated to call for movement of the spout 4 to a position difierent from its present position, a voltage is developed across the bridge circuit of the Wheatstone bridge and the coil 138 of the relay 139 is energized. Depending upon the desired direction of movement of the spout 4, a positive or negative voltage is developed across the coil 138 to cause the movable arm 83 of the switch 82 to engage one of its contacts 79 or 81. Upon the movable arm 83 engaging one of these stationary contacts, for purposes of example the contact 79, the winding of the relay 73 is energized. Upon being energized, the winding closes its associated contact 91 and establishes a holding circuit through the winding of the relay 48 so that the push button 34 may be released Without afiect ing subsequent operation of the circuit. The relay 73 also opens its contacts '72 and closes its contact 74. In consequence, the lead 68 to the armature 66 of the motor 23 is connected to the positive voltage lead 59 while the other terminal of the armature 66 remains connected over lead 71 to the negative voltage lead 62. A voltage of a predetermined polarity is now established across the armature 66 of the motor 23 and the motor rotates in a direction determined by the polarity of this voltage. The motor turns the spout 4 and also causes movement of the slidable arm 141 of the voltage divider 29 over its associated resistance 142. The motor continues rotation until a balance is obtained in the bridge circuit of the Wheatstone bridge at which time the coil 138 of the relay 139 becomes de-energized. If the spout 4 is not precisely aligned with an outlet port 8, then the one of the potentiometer sliders 126-135 associated with this particular position is operated by pushing the corresponding adjusting knob 33, (FIG. 3) to produce an imbalance in the circuit until the spout is moved to the exact location. The particular slider of the group of sliders 126 through 135, inclusive which is selected for manipulation corresponds, of course, to the particular slider in circuit through the selector switch 136.

Upon the spout 4 being rotated to its proper position as determined by the Wheatstone bridge circuit, the movable arm 83 is disengaged from its associated stationary contact and the relay 73 is de-energized. The holding circuit for the relay 48 is now opened. However, the relay 43 is maintained energized for a predetermined interval by discharge of the capaictor 93 through the winding of the relay. The diode rectifier 84 prevents short-circuiting of the capacitor during this interval.

If the final position selected for the spout 4 relative to its present position is such as to produce an opposite polarity voltage from that previously described in the bridge circuit of the Wheatstone bridge, the relay 139 causes the movable arm 33 of the switch 82 to engage its associated stationary contact 81. The relay 77 is then energized and establishes a holding circuit for the relay 48 through its contacts 92. Energization of the relay 77 opens its normally closed contacts 76 and closes its normally closed contacts 73. This causes the lead 71 to be connected to the positive voltage lead 59, while the motor lead 68 remains connected to the negative voltage terminal 62. This condition is opposite to that previously described and therefore, the armature 66 of the motor 23 is caused to rotate in a direction opposite to the direction in which it rotated in the first example.

Whenever one of the relays 73 or 77 is energized, the associated contacts 144, 146 or 143, 147, respectively, are operated. Specifically, if relay 73 is energized, its contacts 144 are opened and its contacts 146 are closed. Therefore, the red IN MOTION lamp 36 and the red OUTLET indicator lamp 37' are lighted. When the spout 7 reaches its proper position, the relay 73 is deenergized and contact 146 is opened while contact 144 is closed and the green STOPPED and OUTLET indicator lights 38 and 37, respectively, are turned off. Since lamps 37 and 37' are viewed through the same window, the OUTLET indicator light effectively changes from the color of the IN MOTION light to the STOPPED light after the spout is properly positioned.

As previously stated, the push button 40 may be employed to determine the instant position of the spout 4 without causing energization of the motor 23. Specifically, when push button 40 is depressed, it opens contacts 49 of switch 51 and closes an additional set of contacts 148. Power is now supplied to the primary winding 94 of transformer 96 but not to the motor circuit since the path between lead 51) and resistor 52 is opened at the contacts 43. The knob 32 may now be rotated. If the contact 137 is not engaging the contact corresponding to the instant position of the spout as determined by the slidable arm 141 of the voltage divider 29, the relay 139 is energized, one of the relays 73 or 77 is energized and the red lamps 36 and 37' are lighted. With the arm 137 engaging the proper contact, relay 139 is de-energized, deenergizing the relay 73 or 77 and the green lights 37 and 33 are lighted, thereby indicating the present location of the spout.

While the distributor has been described as including a hopper having a generally diamond shape and vertical cross section, it may be applied to hoppers comprising a frustrum of a cone, a cylinder, a cup or other geometric configurations.

While 1 have described and illustrated one specific embodiment of my invention, it will be clear that variations of the details of construction which are specifically illustrated and described may be resorted to without departing from the true spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

What I claim is:

1. A distributor comprised by a plurality of conduits disposed in a circle and having open ends forming outlet ports, a rotatably supported spout having an upper inlet end and its lower outlet end adapted to be selectively positioned in registration with any one of said outlet ports, a motor drivably connected to said spout for turning same, an electrical power supply line for said motor, a switch in said electrical power supply line, a relay connected to said switch for operating same, a first variable resistance connected across said electrical power supply line and having a movable arm, a second variable re sistance connected across said electrical power supply line and having a movable arm responsive to rotation of said motor, and an operating circuit for said relay from the arm of the first variable resistance, through the winding of the relay, and to the movable arm of the second variable resistance.

2. A distributor comprised by a plurality of conduits disposed in a circle and having open ends forming outlet ports, a rotatably supported spout having an upper inlet end and its lower outlet end adapted to be selectively positioned in registration with any one of said outlet ports, a motor drivably connected to said spout for turning same, an electrical power supply line for said motor, a switch in said electrical power supply line, a relay connected to said switch, a Wheatstone bridge circuit having two conducting arms, each comprised by a plurality of resistors connected in series and across the electrical power supply line with each resistor having a connection to a contact and a contact arm movable over said contacts, and the other two conducting arms comprised by a resistor connected across the electrical power line and a contact arm movable across said resistor responsive to rotation of the motor, and an operating circuit for said relay from the movable contact arm for the series resistors, through the winding of the relay, and to the movable con tact arm for the latter resistor.

3. A distributor comprised by a plurality of conduits disposed in a circle and having open ends forming outlet ports, a rotatably supported spout having an upper inlet end and its lower outlet end adapted to be selectively positioned in registration with any one of said outlet ports, a motor drivably connected to said spout for turning same, an electric power supply line for said motor, a switch in said line, a relay connected to said switch for operating same, a potentiometer for indexing the motor for setting the spout in registration with the selected outlet port comprised by a plurality of resistors in series connected across the electrical power supply line, a slider for each resistor connected to a contact, and an arm movable over said contacts, a voltage divider connected across said electrical power supply line and having a slidable arm responsive to rotation of said motor, and an operating circuit for said relay from the movable arm of said potentiometer, through the winding of the relay and to the slidable arm of the voltage divider.

4. A distributor comprised by a plurality of conduits disposed in a circle and having open ends forming outlet ports, a rotatably supported spout having an upper inlet end and its lower outlet end adapted to be selectively positioned in registration with any one of said outlet ports, a motor drivably connected to said spout for turning same, a manually operated switch, a first relay having its contacts in said line for controlling the motor, an operating circuit for the relay from one side of said line, through the manually operated switch and the winding of the relay and to the other side of said line, a reversing switch in said line of operating the motor in opposite directions, a second relay connected to said reversing switch for operating same, a potentiometer connected across said electrical power supply line and having a movable arm, a voltage divider connected across said electrical power supply line and having a movable arm responsive to rotation of said motor, and an operating circuit for said relay from the movable arm of the potentiometer through the winding of the relay, and to the movable arm of the voltage divider.

5. A distributor comprised by a plurality of conduits disposed in a circle and having open ends forming outlet ports, a rotatably supported spout having an upper inlet end and its lower outlet end adapted to be selectively positioned in registration with any one of said outlet ports, a motor drivably connected to said spout for turning same, a reversing switch, a first relay having its contacts in the electrical power supply line to the motor for rotating the latter in one direction, an operating circuit for the first relay from one side of the line, though one contact of the reversing switch and the winding of the relay, and to the other side of the line, a second relay having its contacts in the electrical power supply line to the motor for rotating the latter in the opposite direction, an operating circuit for the second relay from one side of the line, through the other contact of the reversing switch and the winding of the relay, and to the other side of the line, a third relay connected to said reversing switch for operating same, a potentiometer connected across said electrical power supply line and having a movable arm, a voltage divider connected across said electrical power supply line and having a movable arm responsive to rotation of the motor, and an operating circuit for said latter relay from the movable arm of the potentiometer, through the winding of the relay, and to the movable arm of the voltage divider.

6. A distributor comprised by a plurality of conduits disposed in a circle and having open ends forming outlet ports, a rotatably supported spout having an upper inlet end and its lower outlet end adapted to be selectively positioned in registration with any of said outlet ports, a shunt motor drivably connected to said spout for turning same, a field circuit for said shunt motor connected across the electrical power supply line, a reversing switch, a first relay having its contacts in the electrical power supply line to the armature of the shunt motor for rotating the latter in one direction, an operating circuit for the first relay from one side of the line, through one contact of the reversing switch and the winding of the relay, and to the other side of the line, a second relay having its contacts in the electrical power supply line to the armature of the shunt motor for rotating the latter in the opposite direction, an operating circuit for the second relay from one side of the line, through the other contact of the reversing switch and the winding of the relay, and to the other side of the line, a third relay connected to the said reversing switch for operating same, a potentiometer connected across said electrical power supply line and having a movable arm, a voltage divider connected across said electris cal power supply line and having a movable arm responsive to rotation of the shunt motor, and an operating circuit for said latter relay from the movable arm of the potentiometer, through the winding of the relay, and to the movable arm of the voltage divider.

7. A distributor comprised by a plurality of conduits disposed in a circle and having open ends forming outlet ports, a rotatably supported spout having an upper inlet end and its lower outlet end adapted to be selectively positioned in registration with any one of said outlet ports, a motor drivably connected to said spout for turning same, a manually operated switch, a first relay having its contacts in said line for controlling the motor, an operating circuit for the relay from one side of said line, through the manually operated switch and the winding of the relay and to the other side of said line, a reversing switch, a pair of relays each having a first pair of contacts in said line for operating the motor in opposite directions, an operating circuit for one of said relays from one side of said line, through one contact of the reversing switch, the Winding of the relay, and to the other side of the line, an operating circuit for the other of said relays from one side of said line, through the other contact of the reversing switch, the winding of the relay, and to the other side of said line, a first holding circuit for the first relay from one side of said line through a second pair of contacts of one of said pair of relays, the winding of the first relay, and to the other side of said line, a second holding circuit for the first relay from one side of said line, through a second pair of contacts of the other of said pair of re lays, the winding of the first relay, and to the other side of said line, a fourth relay connected to said reversing switch for operating same, a potentiometer connected across electrical power supply line and having a movable arm, a voltage divider connected across said electrical power supply line and having a movable arm responsive to rotation of said motor, and an operating circuit for the latter relay from the movable arm of the potentiometer, through the winding of the relay, and to the movable arm of the voltage divider.

8. A distributor comprised by a plurality of conduits disposed in a circle and having open ends forming outlet ports, a rotatably supported spout having an upper inlet end and its lower outlet end adapted to be selectively positioned in registration with any one of said outlet ports, a motor drivably connected to said spout for turning same, a reversing switch in said line for operating the motor in opposite directions, a pair of relays each having a pair of normally closed and a pair of normally open contacts, an operating circuit for one of said relays from one side of said line, through one contact of the reversing switch, the winding of the relay, and to the other side of said line, an operating circuit for the other of said relays from one side of said line, through the other contact of the reversing switch, and to the other side of said line, a circuit from one side of said line [through the normally open contacts of one of the first and the normally closed contacts of the second of said pair of relays, through the armature of the motor, and to the other side of said line, a circuit from one side of said line through the normally open contacts of the second and the normally closed contacts of the first of said pair of relays, through the armature of the motor, and to the other side of said line, a third relay connected to said reversing switch for operating same, a potentiometer connected across said electrioal power supply line and having a movable arm, a voltage divider connected across said electrical power supply and having a movable arm responsive to rotation of said motor, and an operating circuit for the latter relay from the movable arm of the potentiometer, through the winding of the relay, and to the movable arm of the voltage divider.

9. A distributor comprised by a plurality of conduits disposed in a circle and having open ends forming outlet ponts, a rotatably supported spout having an upper inlet end and its lower outlet end adapted to be selectively positioned in registration with any one of said outlet ports, a motor drivably connected to said spout for turning same, a reversing switch, a pair of relays for operating the motor in opposite directions and one of said relays having a pair of normally open contacts and the other having a pair of normally open and a pair of normally closed contacts, an operating circuit for one of said relays from one side of said line, through one contact of the reversing switch, the

winding of the relay, and to the other side of said line, an operating circuit for the other of said relays from one side of said line, through the other contact of said reversing switch, the winding of the relay, and to the other side of said line, a signal light for indicating when the spout is turning, a local circuit for said signal light from one side of said line, through the normally open contacts of the second relay and the signal light, and to the other side of said line, a signal light for indicating when the spout is not in registration with one of said outlet ports, a local circuit for the latter signal light from one side of said line, through the normally closed contacts of the second relay, the normally open contacts of the first relay, and the signal light, and to the other side of said line, a third reiay connected to said reversing switch for operating same, a potentiometer connected across said electrical power line and having a movable :arm, a voltage divider connected across said electrical power line and having a movable arm responsive to rotation of said motor, and an operating circuit for the latter relay from the movable arm of the potentiometer, through the winding of the relay, and to the movable arm of the voltage divider.

10. A distributor comprised by a plurality of conduits disposed in a circle and having open ends forming outlet ports, a rotatably supported spout having an upper inlet end and its lower outlet end adapted to be selectively positioned in registration with one of said outlet ponts, a motor drivably connected to said spout for turning same, a reversing switch, a pair or" relays for operating the motor in opposite directions and each relay having a pair of normally closed contacts, an operating circuit for one of said relays from one side of said line, through one contact of the reversing switch, the winding of the relay, and to the other side of said line, an operating circuit for the other of said relays from one side of said line, through the other contact of the reversing switch, the winding of the relay, and to the other side of said line, a signal light for indicating when the spout is stopped, a local circuit for said signal light from one side of said line, through the normally closed contacts of said relays and the signal light, and to the other side of said line, a signal light for indicating when the spout is in registration with one of the outlet ports, a local circuit for said signal light from one side of said line, through the normally closed contacts of said relays and the signal light, and to the other side of said line, a third relay connected to said reversing switch for operating same, a potentiometer connected across said electrical power line and having a movable arm, a voltage divider connected across said electrical power line and having a movable rarm responsive to rotartion of said motor, and an operating circuit for the latter relay from the movable arm of the potentiometer, through the winding of the relay, and to the slidable arm of the voltage divider.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
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US2434435 *Jan 5, 1945Jan 13, 1948Sidney ReibelSystem for conveying chips or other loose material
US3006387 *Aug 29, 1957Oct 31, 1961Rodemich Kermit WBulk storage turnhead
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3250445 *Oct 5, 1964May 10, 1966Cochran William WGrain distributor with indexing and lifting rotors
US3303822 *Aug 2, 1965Feb 14, 1967Modern Teaching Associates IncAutomatic animal selective feeder
US3822729 *Sep 10, 1971Jul 9, 1974Rochette GAutomatic bars
US6006796 *Sep 12, 1997Dec 28, 1999Ashland Inc.Asphalt loading safety system
US6196279 *Oct 4, 1999Mar 6, 2001Ashland Chemical CompanyAsphalt loading safety system control circuit
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/25, 222/533, 222/41, 141/94
International ClassificationG05D3/14
Cooperative ClassificationG05D3/1472
European ClassificationG05D3/14H