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Publication numberUS3119528 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 28, 1964
Filing dateMay 23, 1961
Priority dateMay 23, 1961
Publication numberUS 3119528 A, US 3119528A, US-A-3119528, US3119528 A, US3119528A
InventorsDunning Jr Leighton
Original AssigneeDunning Jr Leighton
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spraying device for retouching faded paint
US 3119528 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 28, 1964 DUNNING, JR 7 3,119,528

SPRAYING DEVICE FOR RETOUCHING FADED PAINT Fiied May 23. 1961 l l I E BY v @JJZJ ATTORNEYS- United States Patent 3,119,528 SPRAYING DEVICE FURIRETOUCHKNG FADED PAlI T Leighton Dunning, Jan, 7806 Cresheim Road, Philadelphia 18, Pa. Filed May 23, 1961, Ser. No. 112,093 3 Claims. (Cl. 222-82) This invention relates to a spraying device, i.e. to a device for spraying paint or the like, in the form of a container from which the paint is discharged by air or other gas under pressure through a manually controllable nozzle.

Paints of various standard colors or shades are com monly marketed in spraying devices of the kind referred to for use, for example, in touching up the bodies of automo biles and the like. With time, the paints or lacquers, as the case may be, originally applied to automobile bodies change to a very considerable extent in tone due to exposure to the weather and the progressive drying out of the paint over periods of time, and are not matched perfectly by the touch-up paints or lacquers available in such spraying devices. Household paint retouching also presents this problem.

The chief aim of my invention is to provide a spraying device in which additional pigment is available for regulatable injection into the paint solution to vary color depth for correspondence with the shade of the paint on automobiles, interior or exterior walls of houses or other objects which require retouching by reason of being scratched or otherwise marred.

Other objects and attendant advantages will appear from the following detailed description of the attached drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a view partly in elevation and partly in vertical section of a spraying device embodying my invention in one form;

FIG. 2 is a view similar to FIG. 1 of a spraying device embodying my invention in another form; and

FIGS. 3 and 4 are fragmentary views of the lower portion of FIG. 2 drawn to a larger scale.

As exemplified in FIG. 1, the spraying device of my invention comprises a container 5 having a perimetric wall 6, and a top closure 7 with a valved discharge nozzle 8. The container is closed at the bottom by a bottom wall 10 which is upwardly arched to a level above the lower edge of the side wall 6. Underlying the wall 10 is a diaphragm 10b, which, with the wall 10, defines a hollow bottom providing an auxiliary compartment 11 for a quantity of pigment P below a large main compartment 12 for paint S in solution with a head A of compressed air or other gas thereabove. Extending down from the nozzle 8 to a point short of the bottom wall 10 is an eduction tube 13, and disposed in the compartment 12 is a ball 14 for agitating the paint solution S by shaking the container. Secured to the lower end of the perimetric wall 6 of the container is a cap 15' having, at the center, a tapped hole in which a screw 16 is threadedly engaged to bear upwardly against the bottom of the auxiliary compartment 11, i.e., against the diaphragm 1%. By turning the screw 16, it will be seen that some of the pigment P will be expressed from the compartment 11 through an orifice 17 in the bottom wall 10. Thus by adjusting the screw 16, it is possible to vary the shade of the paint solution sprayed from the nozzle 8 as may be necessary to match that of the original color in touching up automobile bodies or other objects. The container 5 may be constructed from sheet metal or other suitably stiif sheet material with the component parts thereof welded or otherwise united fiuid-tightly along the regions of mutual abutment. The nozzle 8 may be any approved type, and per se is not to be considered of my invention.

In the modification of FIG. 3 the bottom wall 10a is not provided initially with an orifice as in the first described embodiment. Here, the diaphragm 10c has aflixed to it at the center, an upstanding stud 20 with a longitudinally extending groove 21 and a pointed head 22. As the screw 16a is turned up, the bottom wall 10a will be pierced by the stud 20, as in FIG. 4, with attendant displacement of pigment P into the paint solution S by way of the passageway 21 in said stud.

In the modification of FIG. 2, the container 5b has a removable screw top 71) fitted with a valved nozzle 8b which is adapted to be connected, by a hose 21, to a source of compressed air or gas, not shown. The means for injecting pigment into the paint solution in FIG. 2, as will be observed, is identical with that illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4 and need not therefore be separately described. If desired or deemed prefenahle, the bottom construction of FIG. 1 may be used in the device of FIG. 2 or vice versa.

While in accordance with the provisions of the statutes, I have illustrated and described the best forms of embodiment of my invention now known to me, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that changes may be made in the forms of the apparatus described without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as set forth in the appended claims, and that in some cases certain features of my invention may be used to advantage without a corresponding use of other features.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. A spray device comprising a container having a perimetric side wall, a top closure provided with a valved spray nozzle, a bottom wall within said side wall at an elevation above the bottom end of the said side wall and with said side wall and top closure defining a main C0111- partment for pressurized paint in solution, a diaphragm underlying said bottom wall and with the latter defining an auxiliary compartment for a quantity of pigment in paste form, a stud upstanding from said diaphragm into the auxiliary compartment and having a passageway longitudinally thereof, a cap under said diaphragm secured to the lower end of said side wall, and a screw threadedly engaged in said cap and bearing against the bottom of said diaphragm under said stud, said screw upon being turned causing said stud to pierce the said bottom wall and causing pigment to be forced in regulatable amounts through the said passageway into the paint solution in said main compartment to vary the shade of the spray expelled through said nozzle.

2. A spraying device comprising a container having a perimetric side wall, a top closure provided with a valved spray nozzle, a hollow bottom within said side wall at an elevation above the bottom end of said side wall providing an auxiliary compartment, said auxiliary compartment having an upper and a lower wall, for a quantity of pigment in paste form and setting apart thereabove a larger or main compartment for pressurized paint in solution, a longitudinally grooved pointed stud upstanding from said lower wall of the auxiliary compartment, a cap secured to the lower end of said side Wall, and a screw threadedly engaged in said cap and bearing against said lower wall of the auxiliary compartment, said screw upon being turned causing the stud to pierce said upper wall of the auxiliary compartment and pigment to be forced in regulatable amounts through the aperture incidentally formed in said upper wall of the auxiliary compartment into the paint solution in the main compartment to vary the shade of the spray expelled through said nozzle.

3. A spray device comprising a container having a perimetric side wall, a top closure provided with a valved spray nozzle, a bottom wall within said side wall at an elevation above the bottom end of the said side wall and with said side wall and top closure defining a main com partment for pressurized paint in solution, a diaphragm underlying said bottom Wall and with the latter defining an auxiliary compartment for a quantity of pigment in paste form, a stud upstanding from said diaphragm into the auxiliary compartment and adapted for piercing said bottom Wall, said stud being provided with means operative to provide a passageway placing said auxiliary compartment in communication with said main compartment when said bottom wall is pierced as aforesaid, a cap under said diaphragm secured to the lower end of said side wall, and a screw threadedly engaged in said cap and bearing against the bottom of said diaphragm under said stud, said screw upon being turned causing said stud to pierce the said bottom wall and causing pigment to be forced in regulatable amounts through the said passageway into the paint solution in said main compartment to vary the shade of the spray expelled through said nozzle.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Ansley July 3, 1906 Shatz Aug. 21, 1923 King Dec. 31, 1929 Meurer Feb. 20, 1934 Greenberg Oct. 31, 1950 Kochner M Feb. 12, 1952 Pedersen Feb. 18, 1958 Sykes May26, 1959 Beard Nov. 8, 1960 FOREIGN PATENTS France Dec. 21, 1931

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US825173 *Sep 13, 1905Jul 3, 1906Frank MannApparatus for siphoning liquids from bottles.
US1465617 *Oct 25, 1921Aug 21, 1923Barnett ShatzPouring spout
US1741991 *Nov 1, 1926Dec 31, 1929King Bertell WPaste ejector
US1948306 *Sep 15, 1930Feb 20, 1934Nikolaus MeurerLiquid sprayer
US2527991 *Nov 21, 1947Oct 31, 1950Greenberg Alvin AContainer
US2585253 *Feb 27, 1946Feb 12, 1952Knapp Monarch CoPiercing pin valve construction
US2824010 *Jul 29, 1955Feb 18, 1958Carl G PedersenFlavor-containing milk container top
US2888207 *Dec 20, 1954May 26, 1959Bell & Gossett CoSpray gun
US2959325 *Aug 26, 1954Nov 8, 1960Risdon Mfg CoMethod and apparatus for dispensing dry powders
FR716477A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3240391 *Jul 17, 1962Mar 15, 1966Garton Merlin ESpray container
US3276632 *Apr 2, 1965Oct 4, 1966Stanzel George ARepellent fluid-dispensing weapon
US3339802 *Mar 16, 1965Sep 5, 1967Alberto Culver CoPressurized dispensing device
US3491916 *Apr 18, 1966Jan 27, 1970Dow Chemical CoPolyurethane aerosols
US4635822 *Feb 6, 1985Jan 13, 1987F.P.D. Future Patents Development Company S.A.Apparatus for producing and spraying a mixture consisting of at least two components, e.g. liquids, and a propellant gas
US5154321 *Jan 15, 1991Oct 13, 1992John ShomerDispensing container for multi-component curable compositions
US5244121 *Jul 15, 1992Sep 14, 1993John ShomerDispensing container for multi-component curable compositions having a roller pair for mixing the components
US5829648 *Jan 21, 1997Nov 3, 1998Bath & Body Works, Inc.Sheet spray and sprayer with beads
EP1654169A1 *Jul 27, 2004May 10, 2006Bryan James LarkinA spray applicator
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/80, 222/402.1
International ClassificationB65D83/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/687
European ClassificationB65D83/68B2