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Publication numberUS3120229 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 4, 1964
Filing dateNov 9, 1962
Priority dateNov 9, 1962
Publication numberUS 3120229 A, US 3120229A, US-A-3120229, US3120229 A, US3120229A
InventorsHinkamp Joseph A
Original AssigneeGen Bandages Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bandage
US 3120229 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 4, 1964 J. A. HINKAMP 3,120,229

BANDAGE Filed Nov. 9, 1962 INVENTOR United States Patent 3,120,229 BANDAGE Joseph A. Hinkamp, Evanston, 11L, assignor to General Bandages, Inc, Morton Grove, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Filed Nov. 9, 1962, Ser. No. 236,501 (Jlairns. (Cl. 128-156) This invention relates in general to bandages. It deals more particularly with a new and improved folding bandage arrangement.

As is well known, various types of commercially prepared bandages are utilized for minor wounds on human appendages such as fingers, for example. One type of bandage takes the form of a relatively long strip of material, which might be gauze or the like, impregnated or otherwise treated to make it cohesive and carrying a compress between its extremities. In applying this bandage, the compress is placed over a wound and an end of the strip is wrapped several times around the corresponding finger, for example. Thus, the wound is amply protected while the overlapping layers of cohesive strip stick together to retain the bandage securely in position.

As can well be understood, however, commercially prepared bandages of the aforedescribed character are somewhat difiicult to package because of their relative length. To reduce the overall length of the bandage for packaging, and thus overcome this drawback, it has been proposed to fold the bandage back upon itself, thereby shortening it considerably. However, in folding such a bandage for packaging it must be realized that the cohesive qualities of the bandage strip cause it to stick together wherever portions of the strip contact each other, and this relationship must be assiduously avoided. Furthermore, once folded, it is desirable that the arrangement facilitate deployment of the bandage to its full length quickly and with a minimum of effort.

Accordingly it is an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved folding bandage arrangement.

It is yet another object to provide a cohesive folding bandage arrangement iri which overlapping portions of the bandage strip are appropriately separated.

It is still another object to provide a folding bandage arrangement of the aforedescribed character wherein the bandage can be quickly and easily opened to its full length with a minimum of effort.

It is still a further object to provide a folding bandage arrangement which is simple and inexpensive.

It is yet a further object to provide a method of arrang ing a relatively long cohesive bandage in compact relationship for quick and simple deployment to its full length.

The above and other objects are realized in accordance with the present invention by providing a new and improved folding bandage arrangement. The invention contemplates folding a relatively long cohesive bandage strip back upon itself over dividers in such a manner that the dividers separate predetermined portions of the strip. Other predetermined portions of the cohesive strip contact and adhere to each other when the strip is in folded relationship whereby it is retained in this compact relationship. The portions of the strip which contact and adhere to each other separate readily when the opposite free ends of the bandage are pulled, however, permitting the strip to extend to its full length for use on an appendage wound, for example.

The invention, both as to its organization and method of operation, taken with further objects and advantages thereof, will best be understood by reference to the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

3,120,229 Patented Feb. 4, 1964 FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a folding bandage arrangement embodying the features of the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a perspective view of a relatively long bandage in unfolded relationship;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged side elevational view of the bandage as it is folded into the bandage arrangement embodying features of the present invention; and,

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged side elevational view showing the relationship of the fully folded bandage arrangement embodying features of the present invention.

Referring now to the drawings, and particularly to FIGURE 1, a folding bandage arrangement embodying features of the present invention is illustrated at 10. The bandage arrangement includes a bandage 11 of generally conventional construction which is arranged in such a manner that its cohesive portions are, over most of the area, not permitted to adhere to each other. The bandage arrangement facilitates rapid and shnple deployment of the bandage 11 to unfolded relationship. A simple manipulation of the bandage 11 itself accomplishes this end without the bandage being in any way contaminated by contact with the hands, for example.

Referring now to FIGURE 2, the generally conventional bandage 11 is shown in extended relationship, suitable for use. It comprises an elongated strip 12 of cohesive gauze, although other materials may be utilized. A compress 13, is, in this instance, comprised of a non woven cotton pad held in place by a strip 26 of cohesive gauze overlying the pad and adhering to the strip 12 forming the major portion of the bandage 11. The compress 13 is located substantially nearer one end 20 than the other end 21 of the bandage 11, in a conventional manner, to facilitate placing the compress properly on a wound so that the strip 12 can be wrapped around the compress. The cohesive gauze is preferably a gauze strip treated in the manner illustrated in the US. Patent No. 2,190,378 of Hinkarnp et 211., issued February 13, 1950, and assigned to the same assignee as the present invention. Under this patent, gauze is impregnated with natural latex. Cohesive gauze may be made with other materials such as synthetic latex or the like also.

Turning now to FIGURE 3, the bandage arrangement 10 is contrived by folding the bandage 11 transversely of itself over spacer elements 25 in such a manner that the bandage 11 assumes an S or reverse S configuration. The spacer elements 25 are preferably paper strips which are of a predetermined width substantially equal to the width of the bandage strip 12 and the compress 13 to prevent contact of overlapping layers of the folded bandage strip 12 along the edges thereof.

As will be seen, the spacer elements 25 are of such a length that predetermined opposed portions 30 of the cohesive strip 12 are free to contact each other when the strip is flattened into the relationship illustrated in FIGURE 4, contriving the folding bandage arrangement 10 embodying features of the present invention. The length of these opposed portions 30 on the surface of the bandage strip 12 is but a small portion of the overall length of the strip 12, as can readily be seen. Consequently, when the bandage 11 and spacer elements 25 are flattened into the arrangement 10 illustrated in FIG- URE 4, these portion 30 of the corresponding surfaces of the bandage strip 12, though they stick together, are relatively easy to pull apart. As a result, it will be seen that merely grasping the oppositely disposed ends 20 and 21 of the bandage 11 and pulling in opposite directions causes the bandage arrangement Ill to be opened simply and quickly. The spacer elements 25, being of disposable paper, are of course, discarded.

With the bandage 11 folded in the manner hereinbefore described to contrive the bandage arrangement illustrated in FIGURES l and 4, for example, it will be seen that packaging is relatively simple. The length of the bandage 11 is shortened by. approximately two-thirds and the resultant length lends itself to substantially simple packaging and shipping, for example. Of course, it should be understood that even longer bandages might be utilized and folded any predetermined number of times to reduce the overall length of the bandage to a selected shortened length.

A bandage arrangement 10 has been illustrated which greatly simplifies the packaging and utilization of relatively long commercially prepared bandages. The bandage 11 is folded in such a manner that the cohesive portions thereof do not stick together with the bandage in folded relationship, except for those predetermined portions of the bandage which hold it folded, of course. By simply grasping and pulling oppositely disposed ends of the bandage 11, the bandage arrangement 10 is quickly and simply deployed and the bandage is ready for use. No further manipulation of the bandage 11 is required and the main portion of the bandage, including the compress 13, remains untouched and sterile.

While a single embodiment described herein is at present considered to be preferred, it is understood that various modifications and improvements might be made therein, and it is intended to cover in the appended claims all such modifications and improvements as fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

What is desired to be claimed and secured by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A folding bandage arrangement comprising; an elongated strip of cohesive material having a pair of free ends, said strip being folded transversely of itself to define a plurality of superimposed strip sections, divider means extending between opposed faces of adjacent strip sections, said opposed faces having first predetermined portions and other predetermined portions, said divider means separating said predetermined first portions to prevent their adhering to each other, said other predetermined portions of said opposed faces adhering to each other to retain said bandage arrangement in folded relationship subject to being readily opened for deployment by pulling said free ends of said strip away from each other.

2. The folding bandage arrangement of claim 1' further characterized in that said predetermined first portions of said opposed faces form substantial portions of said opposed faces. V 3. The folding bandage arrangement of claim 1 further characterized in that said free ends are formed on the outermost strip sections of said plurality of superimposed strip sections and extend in generally opposite directions.

4. The folding bandage arrangement of claim 3 further characterized in that said strip is folded transversely of itself to define three superimposed strip sections.

5. A folding bandage arrangement comprising; an elongated strip of cohesive material having a pair of free ends, said strip being folded transversely of itself generally into an S shape to define three superimposed strip sections wherein said free ends are formed on the outermost of said superimposed strip sections in generally oppositely extending directions, divider means disposed between opposed faces of adjacent strip sections, said opposed faces including first predetermined portions and other predetermined portions, said divider; means separating said first predetermined portions of said opposed faces to prevent their adhering to each other, said second predetermined portions of said opposed faces adhering to each other to retain said bandage arrangement in folded relationship, said second predetermined portions of said opposed faces lying adjacent said free ends, said bandage arrangement adapted to be unfolded for deployment by pulling said free ends in generally opposite directions.

6. The folding bandage arrangement of claim 5 further characterized in that said first predetermined portions of said opposed faces are substantial portions thereof.

7. A folding bandage arrangement comprising; an elongated strip of cohesive gauze material having a pairof free ends and a compress between said free ends, said strip being folded transversely of itself to define a plurality of superimposed strip sections wherein said free ends extend in generally opposite directions from the outermost of said superimposed strip sections, a divider means formed of unlike material disposed between opposed faces of each pair of adjacent strip sections, said opposed faces including predetermined major portions and predetermined minor portions, said divider means separating said predetermined major portions of the said opposed faces to prevent their adhering to each other, said predetermined minor portions of said faces coming into contact and adhering to each other to retain said bandage arrangement in folded relationship, said bandage arrangement adapted to be quickly and simply unfolded for deployment by pulling said free ends in opposite directions.

8. The folding bandage arrangement of claim 7 further characterized in that said compress is on one of said outermost strip sections.

I 9. A method of arranging a folding bandage for retention in folded relationship until such time as deployment of the bandage is desirable wherein the bandage comprises an elongated strip of cohesive material having a pair of free ends, comprising the steps of; folding the bandage into three superimposed sections of generally similar length wherein the free ends are formed on the outermost sections in oppositely extending relationship, placing a divider strip of non-cohesive material and of a predetermined length less than said generally similar lengths between each pair of adjacent sections to separate a major portion of the opposed faces of said adjacent sections and prevent their adhering together, the lengths of said divider strips being such that predetermined minor portions of the opposed faces of each pair of adjacent sections come into contact and adhere toqeach other to retain the bandage in folded relationship;

, 10. The'method of claim 9 further characterized in that said divider strips of non-cohesive materialare placed in such manner that said minor portions of said opposed faces are established adjacent the relatively unconnecte ends of each pair of adjacent sections.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,353,332 Hall July 11, 1944

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2353332 *Oct 11, 1943Jul 11, 1944Hall Newton LBinding tape or bandage
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3648290 *Apr 8, 1970Mar 14, 1972Kendall & CoOperating room gown belting means
US4205674 *Aug 23, 1977Jun 3, 1980Amir PoratSurgical dressing
US4214581 *May 26, 1978Jul 29, 1980Bergman Bertil NFoldable first-aid dressings with equal bandage and compress widths
US4545372 *Mar 28, 1983Oct 8, 1985Johnson & Johnson Products, Inc.Unitary adhesive bandage and package
US5939339 *Oct 4, 1996Aug 17, 19993M Innovative Properties CompanyAbsorbent self adhering elastic bandage
US6129929 *Oct 30, 1998Oct 10, 2000Noven Pharmaceuticals, Inc.Patch applicator
US6159497 *Aug 3, 1999Dec 12, 2000Noven Pharmaceuticals, Inc.Patch applicator
USRE29052 *May 6, 1975Nov 30, 1976 Toilet paper roll having a cleansing composition
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/58, 602/77
International ClassificationA61F13/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/0273
European ClassificationA61F13/02H