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Publication numberUS3120261 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 4, 1964
Filing dateFeb 17, 1961
Priority dateFeb 17, 1961
Publication numberUS 3120261 A, US 3120261A, US-A-3120261, US3120261 A, US3120261A
InventorsIsrael Gonzalez
Original AssigneePenn Controls
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gas burner
US 3120261 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 4, 1964 L GONZALEZ 3,120,261

GAS BURNER Filed Feb. 17, 1961 l6- 36 9/% IO O 3O 4 29 $0M: 35 1 12- I? L 34 H6. 2 J H I F|G.|

INVENTOR.

ISRAEL GONZALEZ AT T'Y United States Patent 3,120,261 GAS BURNER Israel Gonzalez, Milwaukee, Wis, assignor, by mesne assignments, to Penn Controls, Inc., Goshen, 1nd, a corporation of Indiana Filed Feb. 17, 1961, Ser. No. 89,995 4 Claims. (ill. 158-113) This invention relates to improvements in gaseous fuel burners, and in particular to target type pilot burners.

Target type pilot burners have found extensive application in the heating and appliance field, replacing certain prior types which were susceptible to outage due to fuel pressure fluctations and to malfunction due to clogging of restricted ports with lint or other foreign matter. Substantial immunity from malfunction due to fuel pressure fluctuations is imparted to target type pilot burners by the use of a fuel inlet fitting provided with a pair of fuel metering orifices oriented to direct converging fuel streams into the burner body toward the target or deflector thereof. It has been found, however, that in target type pilot burners the rotational orientation of a dual orifice fuel inlet fitting can be critical since rotation thereof can produce a marked change in the flame characteristics of the burner. This is due to the fact that the fuel streams issuing from the inlet fitting orifices formed an envelope which is generally elliptical in cross-sectional shape. Thus, the burning fuelair mixture can impinge symmetrically on the deflector to produce a correspondingly symmetrical flame shape in only two positions of the fuel inlet fitting angularly offset 180 from each other. Unsyrnmetrical flame shape is undesirable because it may not afford proper ignition for an associated main burner, or it may not afford proper heating of an associated thermocouple for powering safety shut-oft or other control means.

The burner of the present invention has the advantages inherent in the prior target type burners of similar construction, yet rotational orientation of the fuel inlet fitting thereof has no substantial effect upon the symmetry of the flame produced by the burner. Thus the burner always functions in the manner in which it is designed to function for a given installation, irrespective of the rotational orientation of the dual orifice fuel inlet fitting. Further, the improved burner is free from carbonization difficulties because proper mixing of the fuel and air therein insures complete combustion of all of the fuel.

A preferred form of pilot burner constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention is illustrated in the drawing accompanying and forming a part of this specification wherein;

FIGURE 1 is an elevational view showing the improved burner incorporated into a pilot burner-thermoelectric generator assembly, said pilot burner being shown in vertical section taken along the line I-I of F1 URE 2;

FIGURE 2 is a vertical-sectional view taken along the line 1l-ll of FIGURE 1 and showing the improved pilot burner in elevation; and

FlGURE 3 is a plan view of the pilot burner-thermoelectric generator assembly of FIGURE 1.

Referring to the drawing, the numeral 5 indicates the pilot burner-thermoelectric generator assembly which comprises a channel shaped frame 6 including a pair of spaced parallel flanges 7 and 8 connected by a plate 9. The flanges 7 and 8 are notched at one end to fixedly receive, as by staking, opposite end portions of an end plate 10 which, like the plate 9, is preferably apertured to receive mounting screws (not shown). The flange 7 is formed with an aperture 11, and the flange 8 is formed with a threaded aperture 12 aligned with the aperture 3,120,261 Eatented Feb. 4, 1964 ice 11, said apertures being adapted to removably receive a thermoelectric generator, for example a thermocouple 13 having a hot junction at 14. The thermocouple 13 is formed with a pair of spaced annular ribs 15 and 16, the rib 15 being adapted to engage the fiange 7, and the rib 16 being engageable by a connector nut 17 surrounding the thermocouple 13 and threaded into the aperture 12 to secure said thermocouple in the operative position shown.

The flange 7 is formed with a second aperture 18 in which a supporting sleeve or bushing 19 is fixed, as by brazing. Bushing 19 is provided with an axial bore 2%) having a threaded counterbore 21 at its lower end. The sleeve or bushing 19 constitutes a tubular burner body member, and a tubular burner body member 22 has one end telescopically fixed within the upper end of said sleeve, as by brazing. The members 1% and 22 form a tubular burner body and the member 22 is formed at its outer end with a substantially flat deflector portion 23 extending obliquely across the open outer end of the member 22 and projecting laterally toward the thermocouple 13.

The burner body member 22 is formed with a longitudinal opening 24 extending the full length thereof and which may have, adjacent the upper end of the sleeve 19, a width equal to approximately one-fourth of the circumference of the member 22. Adjacent the deflector portion 25, the opening 24- is enlarged and is defined by a pair of offsets or flanges 25 and 25 depending from the side edges of the deflector portion 23. In the portion thereof projecting laterally from the tubular portion of the member 22, the deflector 23 is preferably formed with a central upwardly offset portion 27. The sleeve 19 is formed with a longitudinal slot 28 which may have a generally U-shaped conformation as shown in FIGURE 2, and which is in registry with the longitudinal opening 24 in the member 22. It will be observed that the tubular burner body comprising the sleeve 29 and member 22 is provided with an air inlet opening through a side wall portion thereof formed by the openings 24 and 28, said air inlet opening extending from an inner end intermediate the length of said burner body to the open end of said burner body adjacent the deflector 23.

The improved burner is provided with aerated fuel inlet means comprising a spud or fuel inlet fitting 29 threaded into the counterbore 21 of sleeve 19 as shown in PEG- URE l. The spud 29 may include a screw machine part 3-1 and a tubular tip 31 having an end wall 32 formed with a countersunk outer surface and provided with a pair of metering fuel inlet orifices 33. The orifices 33 are preferably diammetrically aligned and are angularly disposed with respect to each other as well as equiangularly disposed with respect to the axis of the burner body. The size and angularity of the orifices 33 preferably vary in accordance with the B.t.u. content of the fuel to be burned. Fuel is supplied to the spud 29 through a fuel supply conduit 34- sealingly secured therein by means of a. nut 35 and a compression ring 36 in a manner well known in the art.

The aforementioned aerated fuel inlet means also comprises a mixing tube 37 having a main body portion 38 disposed in spaced coaxial relation within the bore 26 of the sleeve 19 as shown. The outer end of the tube 37 terminates axially outwardly of the inner end of the longitudinal opening formed by the combined openings 24 and 28, for example adjacent the upper end or" the sleeve 19 as shown. The inner end of the tube 37 is formed with a funnel-shaped or frusto-conical portion 39 and terminates in a cylindrical collar 4% which is telecopically fixed, as by staking, onto the upper end of the tubular tip 31. The funnel shaped portion 39 of the tube 37 is formed with preferably four equally spaced primary ings 24 and 28 and travels down througn the annular space .Within the bore 20 surrounding the m xing tube 37, entering the mixing tube through the primary air inlet openings 40'. The intersection of the converging fuel streams reduces the velocity of the fuel and produces a turbulence which results in substantial mixing of said fuel and the primary air entering through the openings 49. The fuelprimary air mixture flows upwardly through the main body portion of the tube 37 and is emitted from the upper or outer end thereof in the form of an. envelope having a circular cross-sectional shape. Upon emission from the tube 37, the fuel-primary air mixture mixes with secondary air entering through the openings 24-.and Z8, and impinges against the deflector portion 23 and is deflected laterally along the inner surface thereof.

The burning fuel-air mixture fans out within the deflector, entraining still further amounts .of air, and by virtue of the shape of the outer end of the burner body member 22, including'the offset side flanges 25 and 26 and the central offset portion 27, said burning mixture is channelled into a plurality of streams to im: part to the flame 41 a fan shape including a plurality of separated divergent flame tips 42, 43 and 44 indicated in dot and dash lines in FIGURE 2. The flame tips 42, 43 and 44 have conical flame base portions 42a, 43a and 44a respectively as shown in FIGURES l and 3. The flame tips 42 and 44 project laterally from the burner and. are adapted for igniting relation with one or more associated main burners (not shown). The flame tip 43 is directed toward and wipes the outer surface of the thermocouple 13 adjacent the hot junction 14 thereof for heating coaction therewith.

The emission of the fuel-primary air mixture from the tube 37 in the form of an envelope having a circular cross-section provides the flame 41 with symmetrical flame tips 42 and 44 irrespective of the rotational orientation of the spud or fuel inlet fitting 29. Improved mixing of the fuel and air in the burning mixture prior to impingement on the deflector portion 23 insures complete combustion' of the fuel and thereby eliminates any possibility of carbonization.

Having thus described one specific embodiment of the preferred form of the invention, it is understood that the embodiment shown was selected for the purpose of disclosure only and is. not intended to impose unnecessary limitations on the claims, or to confine the invention to a particular use. Various changes and modifications may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention and all of such changes are contemplated as may come within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed as the invention is:

1. A gaseous fuel burner comprising a tubular burner body having a fuel inlet end and having an open opposite end provided with a deflector, said burner body being formed with an air inlet opening through a side wall portion thereof extending from an inner end intermediate the length of said burner body to said open end, and

aerated fuel inlet means closing the fuel inlet end of said burner body and comprising metering fuel inlet orifice means for directing a pair of converging streams of fuel into said burner body from said fuel inlet end toward said deflector, and a fuel-air mixing tube disposed in spaced coaxial relation Within said tubular burner body, said mnring tube having an inner end positioned to receive said converging streams of fuel from said orifice means and being provided thereat with a primary air inlet opening affording communication between said mixing tube inner end and the space between said mixing tube and said tubular burner body, said mixing tube terminating at its outer end adjacent the inner end of said burner body air inlet opening and substantially medially of the length of said burner body for directing a fuelprirnary air'mixture axially therefrom within said burner body and toward said deflector.

2. A gaseous fuel burner comprising a tubular burner body having a fuel inlet end and having an open opposite end provided with a deflector, said burner body being formed with an air inlet opening through a side wall portion thereof extending from an inner end intermediate the length of said burner body to said open'end, and aerated fuel inlet means closing the fuel inlet end of said burner body and comprising metering fuel inlet orifice means for directing a pair of converging streams of fuel into said burner body from said fuel inlet end toward said deflector, and a fuel-air mixing tube disposed in spaced coaxial relation within said tubular burner body, said mixing tube having an inner end positioned to receive said converging streams of fuel from said orifice means and being provided thereat with a plurality of primary airinlet openings affording communication between said mixing tube inner end and-the space'between said mixing tube, and said tubular burner body, said mixing tube having an open circular outer end disposed adjacent the inner end of said burner body air inlet opening and substantially medially of the length of said burner body for directing axially therefrom within said burner body and toward said deflector a fuel-primary air mixture having an envelope which is substantially circular in transverse cross-section.

3. A gaseous fuel burner comprising a tubular burner body having a fuel inlet end and having an open opposite end provided with a deflector, said burner body being formed with an air inlet opening through a side wall portion thereof extending from an inner end intermediate the length of said burner body to said open end, and unitary aerated fuel inlet means comprising a fuel inlet fitting removably closing the fuel inlet'end of said burner body and having an inner end formed with metering fuel inlet orifice means for directing a pair of converging streams of fuel into said burner body from said fuel inlet end toward said deflector, and a fuel-air mixing tube carried by said fuel inlet fitting and disposed in spaced coaxial relation within said tubular burner'body, the inner end of said mixing tube being fixed to said fuel inlet fitting and being formed with at least one air inlet opening affording communication between said mixing tube inner end and the space between said mixing tube and said tubular burner body, said mixing tube being positioned to receive said converging streams of fuel from said orifice means and having an open circular outer end disposed adjacent the inner end of said burner body air inlet opening and substantially medially of the length inlet fitting threaded into and removably closing the fuel inlet end of said burner body and having an inner end formed with metering fuel inlet orifice means for directing a pair of converging streams of fuel into said burner body from said fuel inlet end toward said deflector, and a fuelair mixing tube carried by said fuel inlet fitting and having a main body portion disposed in spaced coaxial relation within said tubular burner body, said mixing tube also having a funnel-shaped inner end portion telescoped over and fixed to the inner end of said fuel inlet fitting,

said funnel-shaped portion being formed with a plurality of air inlet openings therethrough affording communication between the interior of said funnel-shaped portion and the space between said mixing tube and said tubular burner body, and said mixing tube having an open circular outer end disposed adjacent the inner end of said burner body air inlet opening and, substantially medially of the length of said burner body for directing axially therefrom within said burner body and toward said deflector a fuelpriinary air mixture having an envelope which is substantially circular in transverse cross-section.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Thorp et a1 Aug. 16, Anderson Oct. 17, Kile Sept. 18, Hajny Jan. 5, Biggie Oct. 3, Kile et a1. Aug. 7,

FOREIGN PATENTS Canada Sept. 27,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1387565 *Jan 20, 1921Aug 16, 1921Thorp FranklinInjector for gas-burners
US2360310 *May 8, 1940Oct 17, 1944Servel IncGas burner
US2763705 *Sep 14, 1953Sep 18, 1956Milwaukee Gas Specialty CoPilot burner-thermoelectric generator assemblies
US2920126 *Jul 2, 1956Jan 5, 1960Baso IncFluid fuel burner
US3002554 *Jul 16, 1954Oct 3, 1961Gen Controls CoGas-fueled thermo-electric generator
US3048216 *Jul 20, 1959Aug 7, 1962Baso IncGas burner
CA606024A *Sep 27, 1960Robertshaw Fulton Controls CoAutomatic pilot burner
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3291186 *Dec 31, 1964Dec 13, 1966Honeywell IncControl device
US3313490 *Jan 6, 1965Apr 11, 1967Honeywell IncYieldable sheet metal burner spud containing a non-deformable orifice member
US4951614 *Jan 9, 1989Aug 28, 1990A. O. Smith Corp.Water heater construction
US5529242 *Jun 10, 1994Jun 25, 1996Hedin; FredrikDevice for making snow
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/430, 239/523, 431/80, 431/350, 239/434.5
International ClassificationF23Q9/04, F23Q9/00
Cooperative ClassificationF23Q9/04
European ClassificationF23Q9/04
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 8, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: JOHNSON CONTROLS INTERNATIONAL, INC., 229 SOUTH ST
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:JOHNSON SERVICE COMPANY, A CORP. OF DE.;REEL/FRAME:003962/0639
Effective date: 19820302