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Publication numberUS3120325 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 4, 1964
Filing dateMay 24, 1961
Priority dateMay 24, 1961
Also published asDE1490738B
Publication numberUS 3120325 A, US 3120325A, US-A-3120325, US3120325 A, US3120325A
InventorsBurdette W Foss, James E Stout, Joseph F Tye
Original AssigneeTokheim Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Header for submerged pump
US 3120325 A
Abstract  available in
Images(8)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 4, 1964 J. F. TYE ETAL HEADER FOR SUBMERGED PUMP 8 Sheets-Sheet l Filed May 24, 1961 n um HI nt mfl ET M & m OG/ V F %R mn w r T f Em m S H Pwmm m mm/M J Q B 1 J F Feb. 4, 1964 J. F. TYE,ETAL 3,120,325

7 HEADER FOR SUBMERGED PUMP Filed May 24, 1961 8 Sheets-Sheet 3 2H 2&5 2,09 207 4 4 l5 2&3 2J7 B 87 2 2&9 Z

INVENTORS F, 5 JOSEPH F. TYE,

l BY BuRuErrE w. Foss 8% 9 JeMEs E. STouT Feb. 4, 1964 J. F. TYE ETAL 3,120,325

HEADER FOR SUBMERGED PUMP Filed May 24, 1961 8 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTORS JOSEPH FI TYE,

34.5 y BURDETTE W. Foss &

. JnMEs E, Srour Feb. 4, 1964 J. F. TYE ETAL HEADER FOR SUBMERGED PUMP 8 SheetsSheet 5 Filed May 24, 1961 Fig.

IN V EN TORS J. F- TYE ETAL HEADER FOR SUBMERGED PUMP Feb. 4, 1964 8 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed May 24, 1961 INVENTORS JOSEPH F Tve, y BURDETTE W. Foss &

Feb. 4, 1964 TYE T 3,120,325

HEADER FOR SUBMERGED PUMP Filed May 24, 1961 s Sheets-Sheet 7 I y 729 I F 17 3 72 101 685 693 5 9 Q '2: g 6| $7 9 I 717 ||n 1 $49 I 731 I I I 3 38 3 4a INVENTORS JOSEPH F. TYE, BY BURDETTE W. F'oss & I9 JAMES E. STouT ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,120,325 HEADER FOR SUBMERGED PUMP Joseph F. Tye, Burdette W. Foss, and James E. Stout, Fort Wayne, Ind., assignors to Tokheim Corporation, Fort Wayne, Ind, a corporation of Indiana Filed May 24, 1961, Ser. No. 112,407 19 Claims. (Cl. 222-76) This invention relates to an extractor type of header for submerged motor pumps, particularly those which are used to pump motor -fuels from underground tanks in automobile filling stations. More specifically it relates to a header of the type described which contains all of the accessory hydraulic and electrical components which are necessary for the operation of the pump and the dispensing system to which the pump supplies fuel, so that after the pump and header have been installed in and on a tank, it need only be connected to the power supply, to the control switches of the dispensers and to the delivery line leading to the dispensers to provide an operative system.

It is an object of the invention to provide a submerged pump header which contains the check valve, relief valve, air eliminator, siphon primer and discharge outlet so that by connecting the delivery line to the dispensers, the hydraulic system will be complete.

Another object is to provide a header which contains the motor starting and line relays, start and run capacitors, thermal overload, disconnect switch and separable electrical connector for both the power supply and control circuits so that when the power supply and control circuit wires are connected to the header, the electrical system will be complete.

A further object is to provide a header of the type which has one part fixed to the tank and a second part removably attached to the fixed part so that by removing a number of fasteners, the second part can be removed from the first along with the pump, motor, check and relief valves, the relays, capacitors and one portion of the disconnect switch so that repair or replacement of the components which are most vulnerable to failure can be replaced readily and conveniently.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide means which insures that the disconnect switch is opened before the second part of the header can be removed from the first part. I

These and other objects will become apparent from a study of this specification and the attached drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a general view of the dispensing system.

FIGURE 2 is a vertical, sectional view of the header, taken substantially on line 2-2 of FIGURE 3, showing the disconnect switch, check valve, eductor and other components.

FIGURE 3 is a top plan view of the header with the cover broken away to show the arrangement of various electrical components.

FIGURE 4 is a section taken substantially on line 4-4 of FIGURE 3, showing the disconnect switch and electrical junction box as well as the safety mechanism for insuring that the switch is open before the header can be separated.

FIGURE 5 is a sectional view taken substantially on line 5-5 of FIGURE 1, showing the relief valve and a shut-off mechanism therefor.

FIGURE 6 is a sectional view taken on the line 6-6 of FIGURE 2 showing the eductor, its check valve and strainer.

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged plan view of the movable cross head of the disconnect switch.

FIGURE 8 is a sectional view taken on the line 88 of FIGURE 7.

FIGURE 9 is a schematic wiring diagram.

FIGURE 10 is a sectional view taken on the line 10-10 of FIGURE 4 showing the pockets for the motor wires.

FIGURE 11 is a sectional view taken on the line 11-11 of FIGURE 4 showing the crosshead and guide means for the disconnect switch.

FIGURE 12 is a first modified form of a combination connector and disconnect switch.

FIGURE 13 is a sectional view taken on the line 13-13 of FIGURE 12 showing the aligning means for the switch.

FIGURE 14 is a second modified form of a combined connector and disconnect switch.

FIGURE 15 is a sectional view taken on the line 15-15 of FIGURE 14 showing the aligning means for the switch.

FIGURE 16 is a sectional view taken on the line 16-16 of FIGURE 14 showing additional means for aligning the switch.

FIGURE 17 is a third modified form of a combined connector and disconnect switch.

FIGURE 18 is a sectional view taken on the line 18-18 of FIGURE 17 showing the apparatus for moving the switch into and out of connecting positions.

SYSTEM, GENERAL CONSTRUCTION Referring first to FIGURE 1, the numeral 1 represents the pavement or service floor of a filling station with the usual island 3 on which are mounted the dispensers 5 and 7 which are of the remote control type such as that shown in Wright Patent No. 2,942,759 granted June 28, 1960 for Dispenser Control Mechanism. Two tanks 9 and 11 are shown buried in the ground and are connected by a siphon line 13 in the form of an inverted U. This line has a reducing T 14 at the top of the downward leg which extends into the tank which is to receive the pump.

Tank 11 is provided with a flange 15 in which is fixed an upstanding nipple 1'7. The first or fixed portion 19 of the header is fixed to the upper end of the nipple by either a flanged or a screwed joint. The second or re movable portion 21 of the header is attached to the first portion as will be described below.

The usual access box 23, provided with a cover 25 is set into the pavement immediately above the header.

The highest point of the siphon line is connected by tubing 27 to the suction port 29 (FIGURE 6) of the fixed portion of the header.

A submerged motor pump unit 31 is attached to the lower end of a discharge pipe 33, the upper end of which is attached to the removable portion of the header at 35 (FIGURE 2). The fixed portion 19 of the header has a small, bottom opening 37 and a larger top opening 39. Both the opening 37 and the internal diameter of nipple 17 are greater than the external diameter of the unit 31 so that the latter may be withdrawn from and inserted in the tank through the former.

Assuming that both dispensers 5 and 7 are to be supplied with fuel under pressure by the unit 31, the delivery line 41 is connected to the fixed part of the header by means of a flange 43 (FIG. 2) and branches at 45, one branch being connected to the inlet pipe 47 of dispenser 5 and the other to the inlet pipe 49 of dispenser 7.

Each dispenser is provided with the usual meter 48, resettable computing register 51, control valve 54, hose 53, valved nozzle 55, nozzle support (not shown), control lever 57 and control switch 59 simliar to those shown in the Wright Patent 2,942,759 issued June 28, 1960. The switches 59 are connected in parallel, as will be described so that either will start the unit 31.

SYSTEM, GENERAL OPERATION' Whenever either nozzle is removed from its support and the associated control lever 57 is operated, the register 51 will be reset, the switch 59 will be closed and control valve 54 will be opened. Closing of the switch energizes the pump unit 31 and fuel will be drawn from tank 11 and supplied under pressure through the proper branch of the delivery line 41, meter, control valve, and hose to the nozzle of the actuated dispenser, so that when the nozzle valve is opened, fuel will be dispensed to the vehicle tank.

When the control lever 57 is returned to its initial position, valve 54 will close and switch 59 will open and, unless the other dispenser is in operation, the unit 31 will stop.

No liquid can be drawn from the inactive dispenser by operating its nozzle valve, even though the unit 31 is operating unless its control lever has been actuated because the control valve 54 thereof remains closed.

The siphon line 13 will transfer fuel from tank 9 to tank 11 until the levels of fuel therein are equalized.

HEADER STRUCTURE Referring now to FIGURE 2, as previously stated, numeral 17 represents the tank nipple upon which the fixed portion 19 of the header is mounted, while 21 is the removable part of the header to which the pump unit 31 is attached by means of the discharge pipe 33. Casting 21 defines a discharge chamber 61 which has a lateral port 63. A swing check valve 65 is pivotally mounted at 67 and is urged by spring 69 to close the port 63 against flow back to the pump unit 31 but to open with the flow from the pump and discharge chamber.

The fixed portion 19 of the header is provided with a radial flange 71 adjacent the upper end of opening 35 and a similar flange 73 surrounding the upper end of opening 39. The removable portion 21 defines radially inwardly extending recesses 75, 77 into which gaskets 79, 81, having rectangular cross sections, are inserted edgewise, so that they will be compressed between the flanges 71, 73 and the adjacent flanges 83, S5 of the movable part so as to seal the joints between 19 and 21 when the latter are assembled.

A delivery chamber 87 is defined by the assembled header parts and seals just described which receives fuel discharged through the port 61, check valve 65. The fixed header part 19 defines a port 59 which is surrounded by a recess 91 which receives a gasket 93. The latter is compressed by the discharge flange 43 which is mounted on 19 by means of suitable screws 95.

The bottom end of the fixed header part 19 is provided with a flat surface 97 which is adapted to rest on the upper face 99 of: the flange 101 which is fixed to the upper end of the tank nipple. A radial recess 103 is defined by the part 19 and face 99, which receives an annular gasket 105, which is of rectangular cross section and which is compressed when the surface 97 and face 99 are 'drawn together by the screws 167 which hold the header on the flange 101.

The removable header part 21 has a circular pilot 22 which is coextensive with the opening 35. The pilot is bevelled at 111 to enable the pilot to enter the opening in the gasket to assist in confining it in the recess 103.

An axially extending, tapped opening 117 is formed in the pilot portion 22 which communicates through a lateral passage with an L-shaped passage 119, 126 in the fixed part of the header.

A tubing fitting 121 is screwed into 117 and a tube coupling 123 and tube 125 are connected to the fitting. The tube 125 extends downwardly along the discharge pipe and is fastened thereto by clamps 127. It terminates adjacent the upper end of unit 31.

The leg 120 of the L-shaped passage extends axially upwardly through 19, and is counterbored at 129, and terminates in a second, larger counterbore or suction chamber 131 which is tapped at 133 and which is encircled by a recess 135.

Referring to FIGURE 6, the venturi piece 137 of the eductor 139 has a reduced boss 141 which is pressed into the counterbore 129. The nozzle or jet forming element 143 of the eductor has an axially extending hollow boss 145 which is externally threaded and screws into the threads 133 of the counterbore 131. A resilient gasket 147 is disposed in recess and is compressed therein by the hexagonal head 149, in which the upper end of boss terminates, as the element is screwed down. The interior of the boss has a diameter which is greater than the exterior diameter of the venturi piece so that the space defined by the venturi piece, counterbore 131 and the interior of boss 145 defines a suction chamber 151. The inlet end of the venturi piece is spaced from the discharge end of the jet forming element so that the suction created by the eductor is communicated to the suction chamber.

A short boss 153 is formed on and extends coaxially from the head 149 and serves to center and hold a gasket 155 thereon. The engt'n of the boss is less than the free thickness of the gasket so that the latter will be compressed by the flat surface 157 formed on a lateral extension 159 of the side wall 161 of part 121 which defines the discharge chamber.

This wall defines a tubular port 163 which communicates with the jet tube 165. The latter is coaxial with the venturi tube 167 and liquid under pressure from the discharge chamber flows through 163, 165 and 167 to create a vacuum in chamber 131 for priming the siphon. The liquid discharged from the venturi is passed back to the tank by way of the passages 120, 119, 117 and tube 124.

The passage from port 163 to the tank, just described, also serves as an air vent. Since the inlet to 163 is closely adjacent the top of the discharge chamber 61, any air or gas which may be forced upwardly out of the discharge pipe 33 will segregate from the liquid in the uppermost pocket 169 of chamber 61 and will be discharged back to the tank via said passages.

It should be noted that the inlet to port 163 is above the highest level of the check valve port 63 and that the jet tube 165 is large enough to pass a large flow of gas. Consequently, so long as gas is flowing through 165, sufiicient pressure to open the check valve cannot be built up in chamber 61 even if a dispenser nozzle valve is open. However, when the liquid level rises above the entrance to port 163 and liquid flows through the tube 165, the pressure in chamber 61 rises and check valve 65 will open if a nozzle valve is open. Any remaining gas is trapped in the pocket 169 and cannot escape through the check valve.

Thus the described structure serves both as a vacuum creating device and a gas eliminator which prevents gas from entering the delivery line 41. Such gas would eventually be measured as liquid by the meters 48.

Referring again to FIGURE 6, it will be seen that the suction chamber 131 communicates through a suction passage 171 with a chamber 173 which, in turn, communicates with a strainer chamber 175 by way of a tapped connecting opening 177. A check valve body 179 IS screwed into opening 177 and defines a seat 189 which surrounds the valve inlet port 181 which communicates with the strainer chamber. A poppet valve 183 is mounted on the body for reciprocation toward and from the seat and is urged in closing position with respect to the seat by a light spring 185. Discharge ports 187 are formed in the valve body and discharge into the chamber 173.

A strainer 189 is mounted in the chamber 175, the entrance to which is tapped for connection with the pipe 27 which communicates with the highest point of the siphon.

Thus any gas which enters the siphon will be drawn from the siphon through pipe 27, strainer 189, check valve inlet 131, past the valve which lifts with the flow, against the action of its spring 185, through the ports 187, chamber 173, passage 171, suction chamber 131 into the venturi 167 and will be discharged with the effiuent therefrom back to the tank as described above.

The priming of the siphon is thus effected each time the pump unit 31 operates. When the unit is inoperative, the spring 185 closes the check valve 183 so that there can be no flow to the siphon which would cause it to lose its prime.

It is to be noted that the upper part of the check valve chamber 173 is defined by a removable plug 191 which is provided with a wrench socket 193 to facilitate its removal. When the plug is removed the valve body 179 which is preferably hexagonal in cross section may also be unscrewed and removed with a socket wrench.

The outer end of the passage 171, which is a drilled hole, is tapped and closed by a pipe plug 195 which is further sealed at 197 with litharge or with other suitable material.

RELIEF VALVE Referring now to FIGURE 5, a tubular fitting 199 is sealingly screwed into a threaded relief port or opening 201 in the lateral wall 161 of the removable part 21 of the header. This fitting has a threaded bore 203 into which is screwed a pressure relief valve 205 of the type commonly used in automobile tires. The fitting also defines a valve seat 204 surrounding the bore 203. The valve is mounted so as to permit flow from the delivery chamber 87 back to the discharge chamber 61 when a predetermined differential pressure exists between them.

Since the delivery line between the check valve 65 and the nozzle valve is full of trapped fuel when the system is inoperative, it is obvious that an increase in temperature of this trapped liquid would cause expansion thereof which would produce severe internal unit pressures on the pipes, fittings, valves, header, etc., which contain the liquid. The function of the relief valve is to permit sufficient leakage of trapped liquid through the relief valve and through the venturi structure or the pump and discharge line, back to the tank, to maintain the pressure of the trapped liquid within reasonable limits.

Upon initial installation of the system and periodically thereafter, the delivery portion of the system between the check valve and the dispenser is checked for leaks by pressurizing it to a value above that which would open the relief valve.

To facilitate such testing, a manually operable valve 207 is provided which will engage seat 204 for closing the entrance to the fitting 199. The valve comprises a generally tubular valve support 209 which is screwed into a tapped opening 211 in the lateral Wall 213 of the fixed part of the header. The opening and support are substantially coaxial with the fitting 199. The support includes radial guide means 215 which support the stem 217 of a poppet type valve 219 in coaxial alignment with the fitting. The end of the support which is disposed in delivery chamber 86 is bored to receive seal means 221 and a retainer 223 therefor. The outer end is bored at 225 and tapped at 227 to receive the free end of the valve stem and the spring 229 which is confined between the guide means 215 and a washer 231 on the stem. The spring urges the valve away from the fitting so as to open the entrance thereof. The bore 225 is closed by a screw plug 233.

When the system is to be pressure tested, the plug 233 is removed and :a pencil or other implement is used to depress the valve stem 217 against the action of spring 229 so as to close the valve against the entrance of the fitting 199. The valve is held closed until the pressure in chamber 87 is sufiicient to hold the valve closed against the action of the spring. Thereafter the system is pumped up to the test pressure. After the test pressure has been held for the required time, it is reduced to normal pressure which is insuificient to overcome spring 229 which thereupon moves to the left to reopen the entrance to the fitting. The plug 233 is then replaced to protect the valve stem and spring.

6 WIRING DIAGRAM (FIGURE 9) In order to explain the electrical system, the components thereof and the means for mounting and housing them, it will be helpful to first examine the wiring diagram, FIGURE 9. This diagram pertains to a system employing a horsepower induction type of pump motor which is operable on 208 to 230 volts alternating current. The control circuit however, operates on volt A.C.

In the diagram, numeral 235 represents the usual power supply entrance box which contains the usual master switch 236 and fuses which are connected to two live mains 237, 239' and a neutral main 241. A wire 243 connects main 239 with one side of both dispenser switches 59. Another wire 245 connects the opposite ends of both of the switches 59 to one jack or socket 247 of a separable electrical connector device which may be a disconnect switch 249. The socket is adapted to be engaged by a prong 251 which is connected by wire 245 to one end of the actuating coil 253' of a line relay 255. The other end of this coil is connected by wire 257', prong 259, socket 261 and wire 257 to the neutral main 241.

As stated above, more than two dispensers can be served by each pump and the switches 59 of such dispensers would be connected in parallel with the switches 59 shown.

Wires 263 and 265 are connected by the main switch to the live mains 237, 239 respectively. Wire 263 is connected by socket 267, prong 269 and wire 26-3 to contact 275 of the line relay. Wire 265 is connected by socket 271, prong 273, wire 265 to contact 277 of the line relay.

The contacts 275, 277 close with contacts 279, 303' respectively when the line relay coil is energized. They are otherwise normally open.

Contact 279 corresponding to wire 263 and contact 275 is connected by wire 281 to an automatically resetting, thermal overload switch 283. Wire 285 connects the other side of switch 283 to one terminal 287 of a starting capacitor 289. The other terminal 327 of this capacitor is connected by wire 325 to normally closed contacts 323', 313 of a star-ting relay 309. The contact 313 is connected by wire 311, terminal 316 and wire 315 to the terminal 317 of the running capacitor 299, the other terminal of which is connected by wire 291 to the terminal 287 of the starting capacitor.

The terminal 293 is also connected by Wire 297 to one end of the main winding of the motor, the other end of which is connected by wire 301, terminal 305 and wire 302 to the contact 303 of the line relay. The coil 307 of thle starting relay is connected between terminals 305 and 3 6. i

The star-ting or phase winding 321 of the motor is connected between wire 301 and to terminal 317 of the running capacitor 295 by wire 319.

Thus the main winding 299 is connected directly across the line relay contacts from 279 through 283, 285, 287, 291, 293, 297, main winding 301, 305, 302 to 303. The starting relay coil 307 and the phase winding 321 are also thus connected in parallel between the terminals. Both capacitors 289, 295 are connected in parallel with each other when the starting relay is closed, and are connected in series with the phase winding.

Voltage is generated in the phase winding by the running winding as the motor speeds up and when the voltage reaches a predetermined value corresponding to the speed at which the capacitor 289 is no longer needed, the starting relay coil 307 will open its associated contacts 313, 333 to break the circuit through the starting capacitor 289.

When motors of smaller horse power, such as /2 and /3 horse power are used, the running capacitor 295 is not 7 required and it is merely omitted from the circuit described above.

ELECTRIC COMPONENT STRUCTURE AND HOUSING Referring to FIGURES 2 and 3, the upper part of the removable header portion 21 is provided with an intermediate, transverse wall 331, a peripheral wall 333 and a top wall 335 which defines an electric components or junction chamber 337 which is generally cylindrical and concentric with the discharge pipe 33 and has a lateral extension 339 on one side which overlies a junction chamber 341 which is defined by top, bottom and side walls 343, 345 and 347 which are integral with the fixed portion 19 of the header.

The wall 331 defines an opening 349 which is coaxial with the discharge pipe and through which the upper end of the wire conduit 351 extends into the chamber. The conduit is also concentric with the discharge pipe, extends therethrough and has its bottom end sealingly connected with the motor. A clamp 352 is fastened to the upper end of conduit 351 and has one end of a ground wire 354 soldered or otherwise fastened to it to provide electrical continuity. The other end of the wire is soldered to a terminal 356 which is held in electrical contact with the packing gland 358 by a screw 360.

The opening 349 is counterbored at 353 and the counterbore is tapped at 355 to receive an annular plug portion 357 of the packing gland, which is slipped over the conduit and supports a sealing mechanism 359 in sealing relation with the conduit to prevent liquid which enters the counterbore 353 through opening 349 from passing along the conduit into chamber 337. A gasket 361 is compressed into a recess 363, adjacent the outer end of the counterbore, by the packing gland to seal the counterbore.

The relays 255, 309, capacitors 289, 295 and the overload switch are mounted on the header part 21, in chamber 337 by suitable clamping means and screw fastenings and are preferably arranged as shown in FIGURE 3.

The disconnect switch 249 comprises a socket part 365 and a plug part 367 which are mounted on the fixed and removable header parts respectively and will now be described in detail.

DISCONNECT SWITCH As shown particularly in FIGURES 2 and 4, the wall 343 of chamber 341 defines a cylindrical opening 369, the axis of which extends preferably, but not necessarily, parallel to the axis of the discharge pipe 33.

The upper end of the opening is provided with multiple counterbores which form a recess 371 for gasket 373, a recess 375 to receive a radial flange 377 of the socket part 365 and a recess 379 to receive a second gasket 381.

A number of screws 383 extend through holes 385 in the flange 37 7 of the socket part and are screwed into holes 387 in the wall 343. The screws hold the socket in the opening 369 and hold the gasket 373 compressed to seal the opening.

The wall 331 of the removable header part defines an opening 389 which is coaxial with opening 369, is counterbored to provide a recess 391 which receives a radial flange 393 of the connector part 367. A radial surface 395' extends outwardly from the recess and terminates in the radial groove 77 which holds the gasket 81 as previously described. The surface 395' compresses the gasket 381 to seal off the recess 391 when the header parts are assembled. Screws 395 are passed through holes in the flange 393 and enter tapped holes 397 in the wall 331 to hold the connector part 367 on the part 21.

The connector part 365 is preferably made of an electric insulating material which is molded so as to define upper and lower chambers 399, 401 which are separated by a wall 403. Prong sockets or jacks 247, 261, 267 and 271 (FIGS. 4 and 9) are disposed upright in the chamber 399 with their open ends uppermost. Each socket is held in place by a rivet 405 which also passes through one leg of a solder lug 407 disposed in the chamber 401, to which the wires 263, 265, 257 and 245 from the main entrance box and the dispenser switches are soldered in the order described above. The chamber 401 is preferably filled with a potting material 409 after the wire to lug connections are made.

These wires enter the chamber 341 through an electric conduit 411, FIGURE 4, which is screwed into a tapped boss 413 which forms a part of the fixed header 19 through a chamber 415 which may be filled with potting material and through a tapered rubber plug 417. The plug fits in a frusto-conical bore 419 in a boss 421 which extends into the chamber. The plug is formed with axailly directed, tapered holes 423, one for each of the four wires and is held compressed in the bore 419 by a plate 42-5 which is perforated at 426 in alignment with holes 423 and is held in place by screws 427 as seen in FIGURES 2 and 4. This structure serves as a strain relief for the wires. The incoming wires are spliced or otherwise connected to the corresponding pigtails which are fastened to and extend from the chamber 401 of the switch part 365 as described above.

The wall 429 of chamber 341 which is opposite to that which carries boss 421 defines an access opening 431 which is exteriorly counterbored to provide a recess 433 for a gasket 435. A cap 437 has an axial boss 439 adapted to enter the opening and a flange 441 which extends over the gasket and compresses it into seating relation when its holding screws 443 are drawn down. As will be seen from FIGURE 4, the top end of chamber 399 of connector part 365 is closed by an insulating disc 445 which defines four perforations 447 which are axially aligned, one with each jack. The disc is preferably held in place in a radial recess which encircles the upper end of chamber 399, by screws (not shown).

The upper connector part 367 defines a lower chamber 451, the side wall of which has four longitudinally extending grooves 452 as seen in FIGURE 11, which are preferably spaced degrees apart. It also defines three additional longitudinal grooves 454 and a fourth groove 456 which serve as guides for the cross-head explained below. Groove 456 has a different cross section than grooves 454. These grooves are preferably spaced 90 degrees from each other and 45 degrees from the grooves 452.

The chamber is closed at its upper end by a transverse wall 455. This part 367 is also preferably molded from electrical insulating material. Four pockets 453 (FIG. 10) are formed in the upper surface of this wall and the pockets have channels 467 which lead in the same lateral direction to open through the side of the connector part 367. A solder lug 465 is disposed in each pocket. The pockets are closed by an insulating cover 468 which is held in place by screws 469.

Four conductive metal spring brushes 457 are arranged, one in each of the grooves 452. Each brush has a bent in ear 457 at its upper end which is fixed to the wall 455 by a rivet 459 which passes through the car 457, the wall 455, extends into a corresponding pocket 453 and through the solder lug 465 which occupies the pocket, and is upset to hold the parts together and to establish electric continuity from the brush to the solder lug.

The wires 257', 245', 263 and 265 which are connected to the solder lugs extend toward the chamber 337 for convenient connection with the electrical components housed therein.

As seen in FIGURES 4 and 11, the brushes are made of flat, strip stock and project downwardly and inwardly from the car 457' toward the central axis of the chamber and their ends are curved outwardly at 461.

The cover 469 and wall 453 define cylindrical openings 473, 475 which are coaxial with chamber 451 and in which a pushrod 477 is mounted for reciprocation.

A spring seat 479 is fixed to the outer end of the rod 9 477 and a compression spring 481 is confined between the seat and cover 468 so that it will tend to withdraw the pushrod [from the chamber.

A plunger 483, of insulating material, is disposed within the chamber 451 and is attached to the inner end of the pushrod 477 for reciprocation thereby. The plunger is provided with four longitudinal grooves 485 (FIG. 7) which are disposed in complementary relation to the brush grooves 452. It is also provided with three longitudinal ribs 487 which are adapted to slide in the grooves 454 and a fourth rib 489' which has a cross sectional form corresponding to the groove 456 in which it slides. This rib 489 is wider at its base than the grooves 454 and is outwardly tapered while groove 456 is also tapered, so that the plunger can be inserted in the cylinder in only one rotational position i.e. that in which rib 489 enters groove 456.

The grooves 485, as seen in FIGURE 7 are generally T-shaped in cross section, with the wide portion 491 disposed at the inner end. The contact blades or plugs 251, 259, 269 and 273 are made of flat, conductive metal strip stock. Each blades has a width and thickness somewhat less than that of the wide part of the groove so that it cannot escape radially from the wide portion of the groove but so that its lower end, which projects beyond the bottom of the plunger, can til-t toward and from the longitudinal axis of the plunger to enable the blade to center itself between the two contacts of the corresponding jack 247, 261 267 and 271. The contacts of the jack are turned outwardly at their upper ends as shown at 493 and the end of the blade is tapered or rounded as shown at 495 to facilitate its entry into the jack.

Each blade is retained against longitudinal escape from its slot by a pin 497 which passes through a hole 499' of slightly larger diameter than the pin, formed in the blade adjacent its upper end. The pin is driven into a tight fitting hole 501 in the plunger. Thus the pin will not interfere with the tilting action of the blade.

As will be seen from FIGURES 4 and 9, the blades 251, 259 are shorter in length than blades 269, 273'. Thus as the plunger is raised, blades 251 and 259 will first disengage their respective jacks 247, 261 and thereafter blades 269 and 273 will disengage their jacks 267, 271. Of course, upon downward movement of the plunger the longer blades, which carry the 220 volt potential, will engage their jacks before the shorter blades which carry the 115 volt potential engage their jacks.

Since, as described above, the 115 volt circuit energizes the coil 253 of the line relay, it follows that it this circuit is broken before the 220 volt circuit, the relay will be deenergized and its contacts will be open to interrupt the 220 volt circuit. Thus when the long blades part from their jacks, there is no load on the 220 volt circuit and no sparking can occur. The same is true when the plunger moves to the circuit closing position.

As shown in FIGURE 4, the lower, curved ends of the brushes 457 are guided in the narrow portions of the plunger grooves 485 and ride on and in sliding contact with the respective blades and since they are made of springy material, they will maintain such contact even though the blades tilt as described above.

The lower end of chamber 451 is closed by a cover 503 of insulating material which is held in position by suitable fasteners (not shown) and which defines four holes 555 which are disposed to permit the projection of the blades out of the chamber 451 as the plunger 483 is depressed. These holes are of course aligned with the holes 447 in the cover 445 of the connector part 365.

SAFETY MECHANISM In order to insure that the disconnect switch is open before the header part 21 is removed from part 19, a second pushrod 504 is reciprocably mounted in a bore 507 formed in a boss 509 which depends from the wall 335 (FIGS. 2 and 4). A counterbore provides a chamher an to receive a seal 51s for the pushrod 504. The seal is held in place by a J-shaped guard 515 which has its long leg 517 fixed to the exterior of wall 335 by suitable screws 519. The leg 517 is perforated at 521 and the upper end of pushrod 504 extends therethrough. The short leg 523 of the guard overlies the end of the pushrod 504 to prevent accidental operation thereof or damage thereto. The pushrod 50 4 is in substantially coaxial engagement with pushrod 477 of the disconnect switch and is moved upwardly thereby when the latter is raised by its spring 481.

The pushrods are held in their lowermost, switch closing position when the header is fully assembled and in its opera-ting condition, by a yoke 525. The yoke comprises a cross member 527 which is bowed upwardly at its mid portion 529 to clear the leg 517 and to overlie the end of pushrod 50 4 and hold it depressed. A recess 530 is provided in the cross member to receive the upper end of rod 504 to aid in properly assembling the yoke on the header. A tubular member 53-1 is fixed to each end of the cross member so as to depend therefrom. The tubular members extend over the heads of two of the screws 533 which are used to hold the parts '19 and 21 together and shroud these heads so that no ordinary wrench can be used to remove the screws without first removing the yoke holding screws 535 which are passed through holes in the cross member and are screwed into wall 335 to hold the member in the wall in its pushrod depressed position.

The length of the short switch blades 251, 259 and the distance to which they enter their respective jacks when the switch is fully closed, are preferably made such that even though the yoke is not entirely removed as it should be, the short blades will be disconnected to break thel15 volt circuit whenever the yoke is raised far enough to permit screws 533 to be removed even by unlusual methods. While the long blades will still be engaged with their respective jacks, the circuit therethrough will be opened by the line relay.

It is, of course, practically impossible to prevent deliberate disregard of prescribed procedures. Therefore, the structure is intended to and does prevent accidental departure from the proper procedure.

ACCESS OPENING As will be seen from FIGURE 2, the wall 335 defines a large circular opening 536 which is encircled by a recess 537 which receives a gasket 539. A cover 541 has an axial flange 543 which is adapted to enter the gasket and opening and a radial flange 545, which overlies a corresponding flange 547 on walls 333 and 335. The cover is held in place by a number of screws 549 which pass through holes in flange 545 and screw into tapped holes 553 in flange 547, to draw the flanges together and thereby compress the gasket 539 into sealing relation to the cover and header part to seal the opening.

INSTALLATION AND OPERATION It is obvious from the above disclosure that the fixed header part 19 is made a part of the tank which receives the submerged motor pump unit 31, that the delivery line running to the pedestals, the siphon suction line 27 and the wire conduit 411 are rigidly connected to this part, in communication with the delivery chamber 87, the eductor suction chamber and the junction chamber 341 respectively. These connections are all easy to make and need not be disturbed thereafter in order to repair or to replace parts and components which may wear, fail or otherwise require attention.

The wires 245, 257, 263 and 265 are shown passed through the conduit 411 and inserted through plug 417 and plate 425. After the plug is clamped securely in boss 421, these Wires are connected to the corresponding pigtails of switch part 365 and the cover 437 is replaced.

1 1 Thereafter these connections need not be again disturbed except in unusual circumstances.

After the system including the dispensers, has been installed, the tanks have been filled with fuel and the system has been primed, it is usually desirable to test it for leaks.

To test the system, a pressure gage is connected at any convenient point in the system between the header check valve 65 and control valve 54 of any pedestal. The plug 233 (FIGURE 5) is removed and, with the pump unit 31 operating, the valve stem 217 is depressed with a rod. or other tool to seat valve 219 over the inlet to relief valve 199. The motor pump unit is then operated until the desired pressure, within the maximum which the pump unit is capable of producing, is reached. The pressure on valve stem 217 may be removed since the valve 219 will be held closed by the liquid pressure. Plug 227 may also be replaced. The pump unit is then stopped and the pressure gauge is read after a predetermined time has elapsed to determine if the pressure in the system has dropped. If the pressure has dropped by an amount which cannot be tolerated, the leak must be located and repaired and the test repeated.

In the event that the pressure is held satisfactorily, the valve 219 may be opened by merely draining some liquid from one of the dispensers to reduce the pressure in the system to the normal maximum operating pressure or by making an ordinary delivery from the dispenser with the pump running. In either case the spring 229 will overcome the pressure acting to hold the valve 219 closed and will open this valve so that the relief valve can perform its function in the usual manner.

In starting up the system, the discharge pipe 33 will of course contain air, as will the discharge and delivery chambers 61, 87, the delivery lines 41 etc. This air must be purged by forcing fuel into the system driving the air ahead of it. Any air which is contained between the pump unit 31 and the check valve will be driven to the highest point of the discharge chamber 61, namely the pocket 169 from which most of it will escape via the opening 163 (FIG. 2) eductor jet 165, eductor nozzle 167 and passages 120, 119, 117 back to the tank. The limiting diameter in this passage is the jet tube and this is made large enough to prevent sufiicient pressure from building up in chamber 61 to open the check valve 65 so long as air is flowing therethrough. However, when liquid passes through the jet tube, the resistance to such flow enables the pressure in chamber 61 to be built up by the pump unit to a great deal more than is necessary to open the check valve. As a result liquid will pass through the valve port 63, into chamber 87, the delivery line and the dispensers, forcing air ahead of it out of the discharge nozzles to purge the entire system.

When liquid flows through the eductor, a vacuum will be created in the chambers 151 and 173 which is su i.- cient to lift the check valve 183, so that air will be withdrawn from the siphon line 13 through T 14, tube 27, screen 189, check valve port 181, port 187, passage 171 and chamber 151 into the eductor which then discharges the air along with the eductor effluent to the tank. Such action is continued long enough to evacuate the siphon line so that liquid will move from tank 9 to tank 11 through the siphon line as may be required to equalize their levels.

This priming operation may obviously be performed without discharging liquid from the dispensers. Further, each time the pump is started, as when fuel is being dispensed, any air which may accumulate in either the discharge pipe, discharge chamber 61 or the siphon line will be purged as just described. No air can be delivered through the check valve 65 into the delivery chamber 87 and to the rest of the system downstream from the check valves, to cause erroneous readings of the registers 51.

In the event that trouble is experienced with the motor, pump or any of the components which are mounted there- 12. on, it is advisable to remove the header part 21 from the fixed part 19. This can be done easily and rapidly as will now be described.

To remove the pump and motor unit 31, the removable part 21 of the header and the accessories which are attached thereto, from the fixed part 19, the screws 533 and 534 must be removed. It is impossible to remove screws 533 without first removing screws 535 which hold the yoke 525 in place. As screws 535 are removed, the spring 431 (FIG. 2) will raise the pushrods 477 and 594, the plunger 483 and the yoke, as the screws are loosened: Before the screws 535 are entirely disengaged, the short switch blades 251 and 25? will have disengaged their respective jacks 247, 261. Thus, as previously stated, the line relay 255 will be deenergized and its contacts will be open so that there will be no potential across the two longer blades.

When the screws 535 and yoke 525 are completely removed, the spring will have withdrawn both the long and short blades into chamber 451 far enough so that the long blades do not project beyond the cover 593.

Thus all danger of arcing is eliminated before the seal between the fixed and removable header parts, established by gasket 81, is disabled.

After the yoke is removed, the two screws 533 shrouded thereby are exposed so that they may be removed. This frees the removable header and motor pump assembly for removal.

The usual practice is to substitute a spare assembly so as to minimize the time during which the affected system is out of service. The installation is effected by reversing the removal process described above, that is the assembly is inserted through the fixed header part, the screws 533 and 534 are inserted and tightened so as to close the liquid passages, the yoke is replaced on the pushrod 5M- and screws 535 are inserted and drawn down. As this occurs, the pushrods 594, 477 and plunger 483 are depressed to cause the long switch blades to engage their jacks and thereafter to cause the short blades to engage their jacks. During this operation the screws 533 are effectively shrouded by the tubes 531.

The removed unit may then be repaired and provides a spare unit for service. The repairs can be conveniently accomplished because the check valve, relief valve, the capacitors and relays, the motor pump unit and the movable parts of the disconnect switch are all installed in the removable part. These are the components which are most likely to cause trouble in such a system.

Further, since the electrical components are all housed in the removable part of the header, the proper components and combination of components for the motor pump are incorporated in the assembly. Herctofore a great deal of trouble has been experienced because the electrical components such as the capacitors and relays were housed in a box which was separate from the motor assembly and was installed in the station house. This led to loss of the control box which was shipped as a separate package, to connecting a pump of one type to a control box for a different type motor and to improper wiring of the electrical components to the motor through the separable connector, due to mixing the wires. All of these very serious difficulties which resulted in burn out of motors, improper operation thereof and consequent financial losses have been eliminated by this structure.

While the axis along which the pushrods 504, 477 and plunger 483 of the disconnect switch move in making and breaking the circuits is shown to be substantially parallel to the axis of the conduit 351 and pipe 33, this is not a critical relationship because the switch blades are disconnected from their jacks before the removable assembly is removed and are reconnected after the assembly is re placed. Accordingly, the axis of the switch may occupy a different, that is an angular rather than a parallel resize/3'25 DISCONNECT SWITCH (FIGURES l2 and 13) A first modified form of the disconnect switch is generally indicated by the numeral 555, and, as shown in FIGURE 12, a male connector 557 and a switch member 559 are substituted for the plug connector 367 shown in 'FIGURE 4. All other parts of the header remain un changed and their reference number are retained.

The male connector 557 includes a body 561, molded of an electrical insulating material, to provide a cylindrical wall 563 closed by a bottom wall 565. which is extended to form a mounting flange 567. Screws 395 retain the male connector in the opening 395 of the removable part 21 of the header.

Prongs 569 and 571 are molded into the body 561 and extend an equal distance below the bottom wall for reception by the sockets 261 and 267, respectively, of the female connector 365 when the removable portion 21 is assembled to the fixed portion 19 of the header. Prong 569 extends a short distonce above the bottom wall 565 and prong 571 extends a little farther and both are Within the circular wall 563. Though not shown in F-IGURE 12, the short prong 569 is one of a pair which are in the 110 volt circuit and the longer prong 571 is one of a pair which are in the 220 volt circuit.

The body 561 is also provided with a recess 573 entering from the upper side of the bottom wall on the vertical centerline and is also provided with a vertically extending guide 575 (FIG. 13) projecting inwardly from the circular Wall 563 between any two of the prongs.

A body 577 for the switch member is molded of an insulating material. The top portion of this member has an outside diameter corresponding to that of the circular wall 563 of the male connector and has a depending skirt portion 579 of a reduced diameter which fits slidably within wall 563. The skirt is formed with a vertically extending notch 581, which receives and interfits with the guide 575 of the male connector. A central boss 583 extends downwardly from the body and is provided with a recess 585 aligned vertically with the recess 573. A com- (pression type spring 587 is seated in the recesses 573 and 585. .The top end of the body is provided with four pockets 453 which open laterally in the direction of the conduit 351 in the marner shown in FIG. 10.

Electrical connector sockets 589, 591, 593 and 595 are individually aligned with the upwardly extending portion of the prongs of the male connector 557 and are electrically connected to solder lugs 465 Within the pockets 453 by rivets 459. The solder lugs are joined to the lead in Wires to the motor-pump unit 31. The cover 468 is attached to the top of the switch member 559 by screws 469 and is engaged by the lower end of the pus-hrod 504. All other parts of the header are unchanged.

As shown in FIG. 12, the male connector 557 is electrically connected with the female connector 36-5 and the switch member 559 is electrically connected with the male connector 557.

The procedure for removing the removable portion 21 from the fixed portion 19 of the header is the same as previously disclosed. However, upon removal of the yoke 525, the spring 537 moves the switch member 559 land the push rod 504 upwardly to interrupt the 110 volt and the 220 volt circuits in the order given, but the male connector 557 remains in electrical engagement with the (female connector until the removable portion 21 is raised from the fixed portion 19 of the header. Upon reassembly, the male and female connector are electrically engaged but neither circuit is completed till the pushrod 504 and the switch member 559 are depressed and even then, though the 220 volt circuit is closed by the switch member ahead of the 110 volt circuit, the 220 volt cir- 14 cuit is not energized until the volt circuit is also completed, so there can be no arcing during either assembly or disassembly of the liquid carrying components.

DlSCON-NECT SW'ITCH (FIGURES 14, 15 and J6) The disconnect switch 597, shown in FIGURE 14, differs from the previously disclosed disconnect switches in that the switch is positioned within the junction chamber 341 so that both circuits are interrupted in the fixed portion 19 of the header prior to disassembly.

The switch 597 includes a male connector 599 mounted in the opening 389 of the removable portion 21 of the header by screws 395 and an assembly 691, which in cludes a female connector 603 and a four electrode blade switch 605, mounted in the opening 369 of the fixed part 19 of the header by screws 383.

The male connector 599 is provided with a body 607 made of an insulating material and a cover 60-9 for the body. An opening 611 extends through the body and the cover in vertical alignment with the bore 507 in the removable part 21 of the header. Pour prong-type electrodes 613 project downwardly from the body at equally spaced intervals on a radius concentric with the opening 611.

:The assembly 60 1 includes a body 615 made of an insulating material and is provided with a mounting flange 617 and an annular wall section 619 depending from the flange and is divided by a transverse wall 621 into a small open-ended chamber 623 and a larger open-ended chamber 625 above and below the wall 627.

Four socket type electrodes 627 project upwardly from the transverse wall 621 and are individually aligned to receive the prong-type electrodes 613 of the male connector. Four additional socket type electrodes 62-9 project downwardly from the transverse wall in alignment with the electrodes 627 and are electrically connected to the electrodes 627 by rivets 631 extending through openings 633 in the transverse wall. The rivets are headed to retain the electrodes in the alignment specified. A bore 635, which is provided with a taper 637 at the upper end, extends through the transverse wall in alignment with the opening 611 and the bore 507, all of which are substantially the same diameter.

The switch 665 includes a cylindrical piston 639 made of an insulating material and provided with a longitudinally extending external grove 641 which receives a mating projection 643 extending downwardly from the transverse wall 621 on the inner surface of the annular wall 619 for guiding the piston 639 for vertical reciprocation within the chamber 625 without rotation.

The piston 639 is provided with the cylindrical or skirt portion 645 terminating at a cross-head 647 and a central boss 649' extend-ing above and below the cross-head. A depression 651 enters the top of the boss and tapers inwardly to a diameter slightly larger than the diameter of the bore 507 and openings 611, 635 and a blind opening 653 enters the boss from the opposite end.

Four prong-type electrodes 65 5, 657, 659 and 661 extend through the cross-head 647 and are individually aligned for reception by the socket electrodes 629. As shown in FIGURE 14, electrode 657 extends a short distance below the cross-head and electrode 659 is somewhat longer. Electrode 655 is the same length as electrode 657 and they are in the 110 volt circuit to the coil of the line relay. Electrode 661 is the same length as electrode 659 and they are in the 220 volt circuit to the" contacts of the line relay. 7

A recess 660 is formed in the upper surface of the wall 667 in alignment with the opening 653 and a compression spring 662 is seated in the recess and opening. The spring exerts an upwardly directed force upon the piston.

The open end of the chamber 625 is closed by a stationary portion 663 of the switch 605, which portion includes a body 665 having the same outside diameter as the annular wall 619 of the body 615, a transverse wall 667 which butts against the open end of the body 615 and an open end, annular cavity 669. Four socket-type electrodes 671 are attached to the upper surface end four solder lugs 673 are attached to the lower surface of the transverse wall 667 and electrically conected with the electrodes by rivets 675 which extends through openings 677. The solder lugs are connected to the lead in wires 245, 257, 263 and 265 so that the prongs 655 and 657 of the switch are in the 110 volt circuit to the coil 253 of the line relay 255 and the prongs 659 and 661 are in the 220 volt circuit to the contacts 275 and 277 of the line relay 255.

After the lead-in wires 245, 257, 263 and 265 are soldered to the proper lugs 673, the cavity 669 is filled with a potting compound 679.

The stationary portion 663 is fastened to the body 615 by screws 680 which are passed through counterbored openings 682 in the annular wall 619 adjacent the bottom end thereof, which screws engage tapped holes 684- in bosses 686 rising from the transverse wall 667 of the stationary portion 663.

A pushrod 681 is inserted through the bore 507 to project through the opening 611 in the male connector, through the opening 635 in the female connector and is seated in the depression 651 in the piston 639. The guard 515 is then installed on the removable part 21 of the header with the upper end of the pushrod projecting through the hole 521. The pushrod is then depressed and the yoke 525 is assembled in the usual manner to retain the pushrod in its depressed position.

In the position shown in FIG. 14, the disconnect switch 597 is closed so that upon closure of the master switch 236 and either or both of the pedestal switches 59 the motor pump unit 31 will be set in motion. As previously stated when a submerged pump fails, the removable portion 21 is replaced with a spare unit.

The procedure for replacement is as follows: the yoke 525 is removed to uncover the heads of the screws 533. Upon removal of the yoke, the spring 662 raises the piston 639 disconnecting the pairs of prong electrodes 655, 657 and 659, 661 from the socket electrodes 671 in the order given, thereby interrupting the 110 volt circuit to the coil 253 of the line relay 255 and opening the contacts 275, 279 and 277, 303 in the 220 volt circuit to the motorpump unit 31.

At this time it is advisable to remove the guard 515 and the pushrod 68 1, but if care is exercised this is not mandatory.

Screws 533 and 534 are then removed and the removable portion 21 is lifted from the fixed portion 19 of the header thereby disengaging the prong electrodes 613 of the male connector 599 from the socket electrodes 627 of the female connector 663.

The removable unit 21 comprising the replacement unit is assembled to the fixed portion 19 of the header in reverse order so that all liquid joints are sealed before the piston 639 is depressed by the pushrod 681 to close the switch.

DISCONNECT SWITCH (Figures 17 and 18) As previously stated, it is not mandatory that the disconnect motion be parallel to the axis of the conduit 35 1 and the pipe 33. In the disconnect switch 683, shown in FIGURES 17 and 18 and described below, the disconnect motion is normal to the axis of the conduit and the pipe.

Referring to FIGURE 17 of the drawings, the size of the junction chamber in the fixed portion of the header is reduced and the chamber and the fixed portion are respectively designated by the numerals 341 and 19. The junction chamber has a circular side opening 685 having an internal seat 687 for an O-ring seal 689 and a second, but smaller, side opening 691 providing access means for the lead in wires. A male connector 693 is mounted with- 16 in the chamber with electrodes 695 projecting toward the opening 685.

The removable portion 21' of the header is extended outwardly and downwardly to provide an enlarged chamber 339' having a side opening 697 aligned as a continuation of the opening 685 in the fixed portion 191 of the header. The opening 697 is also provided with a seat 699 for an O-ring seal 701.

A female connector 703, comprises a body 795, made of an insulating material, for mounting socket type electrodes 707 which are connected to the relay 255 as shown in the wiring diagram, and a cup-shaped case and lock member 769 for the body. The body is assembled into the case by screws 711 and spacers 713 and the wires are passed through grommets 715 mounted in the rear wall of the case. The connector 703 is supported for reciprocation in the aligned openings 697 and 685.

A rack 717 is attached to the end of the case 709 to project into the chamber 339 in a direction parallel to the axis of the opening 697 and is received by a guide block 719 fastened to the removable portion 21 of the header by screws 721. A vertical shaft 723 is journalled for rotation in bearing 725 formed in the removable portion 21' of the header. The upper end of the shaft projects above this portion of the header and is provided with a knob 727. A retainer 729 is mounted on the shaft below the upper bearing 725. A pinion 731 is carried by the shaft 723 and is in mesh with the rack 717.

The switch 633 is shown disconnected in FIGURE 17, with the female connector 703 and member 709 retracted within the opening 697. In this position the removable portion 21 may be disassembled from the fixed portion of the header. However, as the female connector 703 is moved by means of the rack, pinion, shaft and knob toward electrical engagement with the male connector 693, the lock member is moved to the right and enters first, into the opening 685, thereby providing a mechanical lock which prevents disassembly of the header and thereafter the connector enters 685 and makes connection with 693. The O-ring 699 seals between the female connector and the opening 697 in both connected and disconnected positions and the O-ring 687 seals between the female connector and the opening 685 when in the connected position. The lock memher 709 extends beyond the body 705 on the right side (FIG. 17) so that the electric connectors are entirely disengaged and 763 is withdrawn from opening 685 before the lock member is retracted far enough to free the cap for removal.

It is obvious that various changes may be made in the form, structure and arrangement of parts of the specific embodiments of the invention disclosed herein for purposes of illustration, without departing from the spirit of the invention. Accordingly, applicants do not desire to be limited to such specific embodiments but desire protection falling fairly within the scope of the appended claims.

We claim:

1. An extractor type header for mounting a submersible pump in a liquid container, said header comprising a body adapted to be mounted on the container, a cap removably mounted on said body, said body defining a delivery chamber having upper and lower openings for passing said motor-pump therethrough, said cap comprising means defining a discharge chamber adapted to receive liquid from said pump and relief and discharge ports communicating with both said discharge and delivery chambers, means on said cap and body for sealing said openings when the cap is mounted on the body, a check valve mounted on said cap and normally closing said discharge port against flow from said delivery to said discharge chamber, a relief valve mounted in said relief port to permit flow from said delivery chamber to said discharge chamber in response to a predetermined high differential of pressures therein, and means includ- 17 ing a manually operable valve for preventing flow from said delivery chamber through said relief valve.

2. The structure defined by claim 1 wherein said last named means includes a fitting mounted on said cap and defining said relief port and a valve seat surrounding said port, said relief valve being mounted in said port and within said seat, said body defining an opening adjacent said fitting, a valve support mounted on said body, in said opening, and extending to the exterior of said body, a valve mounted on said support for movement to and from closing relation with said seat, and operating means for said valve, disposed in said support and accessible from the exterior of said body.

3. An extractor type header for mounting a submersible motor-pump unit in a liquid container, said unit including a discharge pipe and a wire conduit, said header comprising a body adapted to be mounted on the container, a cap removably mounted on said body, said body defining an opening for passing said unit therethrough, said cap comprising means defining a discharge chamber for connection with said pipe, an electric components chamber above said discharge chamber and an opening for passage of said wire conduit into said components chamber, a number of electric components mounted in said components chamber, an electric connector device including first and second parts having interengageable electrodes, means for mounting said first part on said cap, in an opening of said components chamber, said body defining a junction chamber for the terminals of power supply wires, means for mounting said second part on said body, in an opening of said junction chamber, to enable the electrodes of said second part to be supplied with power from said terminals and with its electrodes disposed for engagement by the corresponding electrodes of said first part when said cap is mounted on the header, means for electrically connecting said electric components, motor-pump and the electrodes of said first connector part in a predetermined pattern with each other and with said terminals, when said electrodes are engaged, for controlling the operation of the motor-pump.

4. The structure defined by claim 3 which includes means for interrupting the electrical connecting means in the region between said terminals and said electric components while said cap is mounted on said header.

5. The structure defined by claim 4 in which said interrupting means includes means for mounting the electrodes of one of said connector parts for movement relative to those of the other part and relative to said header, for engagement and disengagement, and manually controlled means for moving said movable electrodes while said cap is mounted on said body.

6. The structure defined by claim 4 in which said interrupting means includes means for mounting the electrodes of one of said connector parts for movement relative to corresponding electrodes of the other part and relative to the header for disengaging the corresponding electrodes, manually controlled means for moving said movable electrodes to disengage them and means for preventing the removal of said cap from said header before said electrodes are disengaged.

7. An extractor type header for mounting a submersible motor pump unit in a liquid container, said unit including a discharge pipe and a wire conduit, said header comprising a body adapted to be mounted on the container, a cap removably mounted on said body, said body defining an opening for passing said unit therethrough, said cap comprising means defining a discharge chamber for connection with said pipe, an electric components chamber above said discharge chamber and an opening for passage of said wire conduit into said components chamber, a group of electric components mounted in said components chamber, an electric connector device including interengageable, separable first and second parts, means for mounting said first part on said cap, in an opening of said components chamber, said body defining a junction chamber for the terminals of power supply wires, means for mounting said second part on said body, in an opening of said chamber, to enable said second part to be supplied with power from said terminals and disposed for engagement with said first part when said cap is mounted on the header, means for interconnecting the electric components of said group in a predetermined pattern for operating and controlling the operation of the motor pump, means for connecting said interconnected group with said motorpump and, through said connector parts when said parts are engaged, with said terminals, and means for interrupting the electrical connection between said terminals and said group while said cap is mounted on said header.

8. The structure defined by claim 7 which includes means for preventing the removal of said cap from said body until said interrupting means has interrupted said connection.

9. An extractor type header for mounting a submersible motor-pump unit in a liquid container, said unit including a discharge pipe and a wire conduit, said header comprising a body adapted to be mounted on the container, a cap removably mounted on said body, said body defining an opening for passing said unit therethrough, said cap comprising means defining a discharge chamber for connection with said pipe, a second chamber above said discharge chamber and an opening for passage of said wire conduit into said second chamber, an electric connector device including first and second interengageable and separable parts, means for mounting said first part on said cap, in an opening of said second chamber, said body defining a junction chamber for the terminals or" power supply wires, means for mounting said second part on said body, in an opening of said junction chamber to enable said second part to be supplied with power from said terminals and for engagement with said first part when said cap is mounted on the body, means for electrically connecting said motor-pump to be supplied by terminals through said connector parts and means for interrupting said electrical connection while said cap is mounted on said body.

10. The structure defined by claim 9 wherein said interrupting means includes a manually controlled switch, and wherein said structure includes means for preventing removal of said cap from said body while said switch is closed.

11. The structure defined by claim 9 wherein said means for interrupting said electrical connection comprises a set of electrodes in each of said connector parts, the set of one part being mounted for movement with respect to the set of the other part to engage and disengage the latter, when the cap is on the body, and manually controllable means for moving said set of movable electrodes.

12. The structure defined by claim 11 which includes an actuator, means connecting said movable set of electrodes for operation by said actuator, said actuator being movable between a first position in which said sets are en gaged and a second position in which said sets are disengaged, means for urging said actuator to its second position, means for holding said cap on said body, said holding means being movable to release said cap for removal from said body, second means removably mounted on said header for holding said actuator in its first position, said second means being disposed to obstruct the movement of said holding means to release said cap, when said second means is mounted on said header.

13. The structure defined by claim 9 wherein said first and second connector parts comprise corresponding interengageable electrodes disposed for separation and engagement respectively as said cap is removed and installed on said body, and wherein said means for interrupting said electrical connection comprises a multiple pole switch having a pole connected with each of said corresponding electrodes of one of said parts, and manually controlled means 19 for opening and closing said switch while said cap is mounted on said body.

14. The structure defined by claim 13 which includes first means for holding said cap on said body, said first means being movable in a path to release said cap for separation from said body and wherein said manually controlled means includes means for automatically opening said switch, removable second means, mounted on said header, for holding said switch closed, said second means being disposed in the path of said first means so as to prevent movement thereof along said path while said second means is mounted on said header.

15. An extractor type header for mounting a submersible motor-pump unit in a liquid container, said unit including a discharge pipe and a wire conduit, said header comprising a body adapted to be mounted on the container, a cap removably mounted on said body, said body defining an opening for passing said unit therethrough, said cap comprising means defining a discharge chamber for connection with said pipe, an electric components chamber above said discharge chamber and an opening for passage of said wire conduit into said components chamber, a relay mounted in said components chamber and comprising an actuating coil and pairs of normally open contacts adapted to be closed upon energization of said coil, an electric connector device including interengageable and separable first and second parts, means for mounting said first part on said cap in an opening of said components chamber, said body defining a junction chamber for the terminals of power supply wires, means for mounting said second part on said body, in an opening of said junction chamber to be supplied from said terminals and for engagement with said first part when said cap is on the body, first means for electrically connecting certain of said terminals with said coil, through said connector parts, second means for electrically connecting other or" said terminals with one of each of said pairs of said relay contacts through said connector parts, additional means for electrically connecting the other of said pairs of relay contacts with said motor-pump and manually controlled means for interrupting said first electrical connection in advance of said second electrical connection while said cap is on said body.

16. The structure defined by claim 15 which includes holding means movable in a path between a first position in which it holds said cap on said body and a second position in which it releases said cap for removal from said body, said manually controlled means including a movable element which is disposed in said path so long as said electrical connections are uninterrupted, to prevent movement of said holding means to its cap releasing position.

17. An extractor type header for mounting a submersible motor-pump unit in a liquid container, said unit including a discharge pipe and a wire conduit, said header comprising a body adapted to be mounted on the container, a cap removably mounted on said body, said body defining an opening for passing said unit therethrough, said cap comprising means defining a discharge chamber for connection with said pipe, a second chamber above said discharge chamber and an opening for passage of said wire conduit into said second chamber, an electric connector device including first and second interengageable and separable parts, means for mounting said first part on said cap, in an opening of said second chamber, said body defining a junction chamber for the terminals of power supply wires, means for mounting said second part on said body, in an opening of said junction chamber to enable said second part to be supplied with power from said terminals and for engagement with said first part when said cap is mounted on the body, means for electrically connecting said motor-pump to be supplied by terminals through said connector parts and means for interrupting said electrical connection while said cap is mounted on said body, comprising a set of electrodes in each of said connector parts, the electrodes of one part being movable relative to the electrodes of the other part and in a direction substantially parallel to said discharge pipe, to engage and disengage the latter electrodes, and manually operable means for moving said movable electrodes.

18. An extractor type header for mounting a submersible motor-pump unit in a liquid container, said unit including a discharge pipe and a wire conduit, said header comprising a body adapted to be mounted on the container, a cap removably mounted on said body, said body defining an opening for passing said unit therethrough, said cap comprising means defining a discharge chamber for connection with said pipe, a second chamber above said discharge chamber and an opening for passage of said wire conduit into said second chamber, an electric connector device including first and second interengageable and separable parts, means for mounting said first part on said cap, in an opening of said second chamber, said body defining a junction chamber for the terminals of power supply wires, means for mounting said second part on said body, in an opening of said junction chamber to enable said second part to be supplied with power from said terminals and for engagement with said first part when said cap is mounted on the body, means for electrically connecting said motor-pump to be supplied by terminals through said connector parts and means for interrupting said electrical connection while said cap is mounted on said body, comprising a set of electrodes in each of said connector parts, the electrodes of one part being movable relative to the electrodes of the other part and in a direction substantially transverse to said discharge pipe, to engage and disengage the latter electrodes, and manually operable means for moving said movable electrodes.

19. The structure defined by claim 18 which includes a member mounted for movement substantially parallel with said movable electrodes, to and from a position in which it locks said cap on said body, and means connecting said members for operation by said manually operable means to move said member to said position before said electrodes are engaged and from said position after said electrodes are disengaged.

References Cited in the file-of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,124,681 Jauch et al July 26, 1938 2,280,087 Hollander et al Apr. 21, 1942 2,385,105 Samelson Sept. 18, 1945 2,657,633 Baker et a1 Nov. 3, 1953 2,840,119 Gavin June 24, 1958 2,986,308 Pacey et a1, May 30, 1961,

Patent Citations
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US2124681 *Jun 15, 1936Jul 26, 1938Wayne Pump CoLiquid dispensing apparatus
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5143258 *May 15, 1991Sep 1, 1992Tokheim CorporationLiquid fuel dispensing system
US6929018Apr 7, 2004Aug 16, 2005Gilbarco Inc.Underground storage tank metering system in a service station environment
US6935356Mar 14, 2003Aug 30, 2005Gilbarco Inc.Underground storage tank metering system in a service station environment
WO2004083105A2 *Mar 11, 2004Sep 30, 2004Gilbarco IncUnderground storage tank metering system in a service station environment
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/383.1, 222/204, 222/136, 222/318
International ClassificationF04D29/60, F04D15/02, F04D13/06, H01R13/527, F04D13/08, B67D7/78, B67D7/68, B67D7/58, B67D7/76
Cooperative ClassificationH01R13/527, B67D7/763, B67D7/68, F04D29/606, F04D13/08, B67D7/78, F04D15/0254
European ClassificationF04D29/60P2, F04D15/02C2, F04D13/08, H01R13/527, B67D7/76B, B67D7/78, B67D7/68