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Publication numberUS3122306 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 25, 1964
Filing dateMay 14, 1963
Priority dateMay 14, 1963
Publication numberUS 3122306 A, US 3122306A, US-A-3122306, US3122306 A, US3122306A
InventorsDavey Hazel W
Original AssigneeDavey Hazel W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Receptacle
US 3122306 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. W. DAVEY Feb. 25, 1964 RECEPTACLE 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed May 14, 1963 INVENTOR HAZEL W. DAVEY Jam %w ATTORNEY H. W. DAVEY RECEPTACLE Feb. 25, 1964 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed May 14, 1963 INVENTOR HAZEL W. DAVEY BY m7 ATTORNEY H. W. DAVEY Feb. 25, 1964 RECEPTACLE 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed May 14, 1963 INVENTOR HAZ EL W. DAV EY BY WW 7 W ATTORNEY United dtates Fatent Gftice p 3,122,396 Patented Feb. 25, 1964 3,1223% RECEPTACLE Hazel W. Davey, 4810 Topeka Drive, Box 367, Tarzana, Calif. Filed May 14, 1%3, Ser. No. 289,463 4 Claims. in. 229-53) The present invention relates generally to receptacles, and relates more particularly to an improved flat folding receptacle having a large basin mouth with a restricted throat opening, for receiving and directing refuse into the receptacle interior, and closable to seal the receptacle and prevent escape of substance or odor. This is a continuation-in-part of Serial No. 186,050, entitled Receptacle and filed April 9, 1962, now abandoned.

The disposal of cigar and cigarette ashes and butts has become a problem which has reached national significance. This applies particularly, for example, to the disposal of lighted butts from motor vehicles, and especially in areas of high fire hazard.

However, the problem of the safe and satisfactory disposal of burnt matches, cigar and cigarette ashes and butts, and the like, is universal. In the home, for e"- ample, the use of ash trays not only is often messy; but this always creates the likelihood that a burnt match or blowing cigarette butt, which has not been completely extinguished, may start a fire upon the subsequent emptying of the ash tray.

It has been found that the receptacle of this invention, usually in sizes larger than that employed for smokers use, is quite ideal for use by persons afflicted with motion sickness. The large basin mouth of this device affords a face covering structure that reduces embarrassment as well as offering a collection facility.

A still further desirable use, as an example of the utility of this invention, is for the reception of tissues and sanitary napkins in public or private rest room areas. The bags store in a flat condition and are readily attached to a wall or other hanger and then sealed and disposed after a reasonable short period of use.

The receptacle of one embodiment of the invention, as will be described, has a flexible construction to facilitate its marketing and shipping, and also permit it to be flat tened out after it has served its purpose, so as to assure that cigarette butts therein are completely extinguished. This particular embodiment, for example, may be formed of a metal foil, or other flexible noncombustible material.

The embodiment is constructed to have a relatively small opening through which the ashes and lighted butts are inserted into an enclosed chamber. The limited amount of air in the chamber due to the small size of the opening has a tendency to smother any smouldering ember and cause it to be extinguished, and to minimize development of odors.

A feature of the invention is that the receptacle is disposable and may be thrown away after it has served its purpose. In this respect, the receptacle itself can be collapsed, as mentioned above, and disposed of without fear of creating a fire, as is often the case when ash trays are emptied.

Another feature of the invention is that the improved receptacle may be conveniently suspended in a manner such that it is out of the way, and does not tend to clutter up tables and the like, as is usually the case with ash trays. The receptacle is, therefore, also adapted for ready use in an automobile; in which it may, for example, be suspended from the dashboard, or from the back of the front seat.

An object of the present invention, therefore, is to provide a receptacle of the fiat bag-like nature, having a top formation that opens to a large basin mouth configuration,

and having a restricted throat opening to the interior of the bag.

Another object of the invention is to provide such mouth of a closable nature to seal the receptacle and prevent escape of substance or odor.

Another object of the present invention therefore, is to provide an improved disposable receptacle for receiving cigarette butts and the like, which is constructed of non-combustible material, and which is capable of receiving the cigarette butts so as to provide a. simple and expeditious structure for the disposal of the same without any danger of creating a fire hazard.

Another object is to provide such an improved receptacle which is adapted to be suspended from the side of a table, desk and the like, so as to form a convenient and unobstrusive means for disposing of cigarette butts and other waste materials.

Another object is to provide an improved receptacle which can be made in sizes to suit the intended use, for example of such large size that it will hold towels, tissues and napkins, or in a small size that it may be carried about, attached to a pack of cigarettes so as to provide a convenient disposal medium for the cigarettes which is always available and handy; and particularly when the user is moving about, as at conventions or similar functions.

In accordance with these and other objects which will become apparent hereinafter, a preferred form of the present invention is disclosed in the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a side perspective view of a flexible receptacle constructed in accordance with one embodiment of the invention;

FIGURE 1a is a fragmentary section taken along line 1a1a of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 2 is a top end view of the receptacle of FIGURE 1 with the receptacle opened out to a completely opened position;

FIGURE 3 is a front clevational view of the receptacle of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is a side elevational view of the receptacle of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 5 is a developed view of the receptacle shown in FIGURES 1-4, and illustrates the manner in which the material is cut and scored prior to being formed into the configuration of FIGURES 1-4;

FIG. 5a illustrates an alternative construction useful for larger size structures;

FIGURE 6 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view of a material for a receptacle, such as the receptacle of FIG- URES 14, and illustrates a sandwiched construction for the receptacle in which two layers of metal foil are used with an intermediate layer of paper, or other filler material;

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary view showing an alternate construction for the bottom of the receptacle, in which the bottom is folded up in the same manner as paper sacks in common use;

FIGURE 8 is a fragmentary sectional view of the bottom construction shown in FIGURE 7 opened into a full capacity position;

FIGURE 9 is a perspective view of the receptacle of FIGURES 1-4 attached to the side of the pack of cigarettes, as an illustration of one use of the invention; and

FIGURE 10 illustrates a large size receptacle used for general waste material.

The receptacle illustrated in FIGURES l5, is formed, for exampie, of a sheet It) (FIGURE 5) of a foil material. This foil material exhibits non-combustible characteristics, so that a lighted cigarette or unburned match may be inserted into the receptacle without a resulting ignition of the material forming the receptacle. Gther material will be adapted according to the intended use of the receptacle. Water resistant paper, plastic impregnated paper, or pure plastic, are examples of materials for uses involving moisture. Plain paper will be useful as trash receptacles for cars.

The sheet 16 may be a single sheet of metal foil or may have a laminated configuration as shown in FIG- URE 6. The sheet of FIGURE 6 includes an inner layer ill-a and an outer layer 1912 of metal foil material, and it also includes an intermediate layer 11 of paper or other suitable material. In the construction of PEG- URE 6, the layers 112:! and 13b are adhesively secured to the opposite faces of the intermediate layer lll.

Either or both of the layers and fill) may be of plastic rather than metal. In such a case, the receptacle is well suited for use as an airsickness bag aboard aircraft, for example, or as a disposal bag for tissues or other refuse.

The sheet if of metal foil shown in FIGURE has a generally rectangular configuration, as illustrated. However, the upper edge of the sheet has a serrated configuration, for purposes to be described. As illustrated in FIGURE 5, the sheet 10 of foil material is appropriately scored, so that it may be folded to the desired configuration to form the receptacle illustrated in FIG- URES 14.

The receptacle of FIGURES 14 is formed, as mentioned above, by the appropriate folding of the sheet it) along its scored lines. The sheet 10 is folded to form a rectangular front panel 12, and a corresponding rectangular rear panel 14. The panel 12 is composed of the two panel sections at each end of the sheet 19. See the end panels in FIGURE 5. The front panel 12 and rear panel 14 are inter-connected by a pair of accordionpleated inter-connecting side panels 16 and 18.

As best illustrated in FIGURE 3, the side edges of the sheet 10 of FIGURE 5 are caused to overlap one another to form a seam 2 and the overlapping portions are adhesively bonded to one another to form with side 12 a solid enclosure for the receptacle.

In the embodiment of FIGURES 1-4, a bottom panel 22 of the rear panel 14 is folded over the bottom edge of the front panel 12, as shown in FIGURES 3 and 4, and these edges are adhesively bonded to one another to define a closed bottom for the flexible receptacle.

To better illustrate the invention, and the folding of the sheet Til into a useful composite structure, refer to FIGURE 5. Here it will be seen that the central panel area 1 2 is centrally located of the blank it First and second extreme end sections 12a and 12b are united to form a composite panel area 12 of the finished receptacie. Note that the right hand edge of the panel 12a in the illustration of FIGURE 5, is extended in order to provide extra material in an edge area 2% for overlap of the panel section 121) and thus provide the composite panel 12 of substantially the same dimensions as the central panel 14. First and second intermediate panel sections 16 and 18 flank the central panel area 14- and are set off by fold lines 37 and 39 from the central panel section 14. Each of the flanking panel sections is further defined by further fold lines as set forth hereinafter. Panel section 16 is set off from the right hand panel section 12a by a fold line 43, and is centrally folded along line The side panel 18 is set olf from the panel section 121) by a fold line 45 and is folded along a central line 22.

The top edge of the sheet Ill is defined by an irregular shape which is intended to fold together to form the desired bas'm shaped top having a central opening. This top edge is defined by a V notch 23 at the end of the central panel area 14. The apex of the V is substantially central of the panel.

The top edge of the panel at the end of the panel sections 12a and 12b slope outwardly and downwardly in the small sizes, but are sharper, or squared for large sizes, as shown in FIGURE 5a. These sloping edges are indicated by the reference characters 24- and 25.

When the panel sections 12a and 1211 are joined, they form a composite V notch corresponding substantially in dimensions to the notch 23. Note that the edges 24 and 25 end at a juncture point over the scam 20, and hence, the folded sheet has two opposed panels 12 and 14. The two substantially identical notches form similar overlap panels.

The ends of the intermediate panels 16 and 18 have more gently sloping V notches 116 and 118 respectively.

Quite essential to the proper folding of the top opening is a fold line 15 extending laterally of panel 16 and a similar fold line 15a across the panel 18. These two fold lines are spaced from the end of the panels a distance equal to about one-half the width of the panel 14 or 12, because this material is eventually folded inwardly toward one another from either side and forms a composite portion of a top surface but with a resultant opening into the interior of the receptacle.

The top area of each of the panels 16 and 18 are then marked with fold lines 35 and 37 respectively, defining an elongated triangle ending at a point along the center fold lines 41} and 42, a distance below the fold lines 15 and 15a. The distance across the base of these triangular fold areas will determine the degree of opening possible in the resultant basin portion of the receptacle top.

The fold lines 17 and 17a then are employed to join lateral fold lines 15 and 15a to the apex corners of the side panels, and fold lines 19 and 19a are natural resultant lines that come about as the balance of the folding takes place. Therefore, the blank sheet 10 is folded into a useful container or bag by first folding the vertical fold lines 43, 37, 39, and 45, to define the panels, and then the fold lines .0 and 42 to bisect the side panels 16 and 18. Then, the triangular areas at the top of each of the panels 16 and 18 are folded along the bisecting lines 50 and 50a such that one-half of the tri-.

angular area lies upon the other half, and may be then secured in that condition. See FIGURE la. The sheet is then joined at the seam 29 area and the side panels folded inwardly along the lines 15 and 15a. In this condition the fold lines are made, but not yet folded tight. By pressing the side panels together, the fold lines are creased sharply and the material closed into a fiat condition for storage. Note the point 21 in FIGURE 9. After the structure is closed as described, this point 21 may fold down as would tedre place by closing the strucsure shown in FIGURE 9, or may be swung inwardly if no projection beyond the side edges is desired. This is a unique possibility under the conditions of the folding as described. Also, when the structure is then fiessed together, folding takes place about the fold lines 19 and 19a, and the fold lines 17 and 17a. According to the way the folder chooses, one edge or the other of the V notch 23 will lie on top of the other, and form an overlap and closing structure directed toward a resultant opening 26 at the throat of the top. Note the reference number 23 in FIGURE 9, depicting the edge of notch 23 lying in overlap relationship to the opposite side of the notch. This overlap relationship is illustrated in dotted outline in FIGURE 2.

In FIGURE 2, the aperture 26 is visible at the center of the basin area. F or purposes of identification between the open sheet of FIGURE 5 and the folded structure, reference characters are used to guide the comparison. The area above fold lines 15 and 15a are indicated by reference numbers 49 and 51. :In FIGURE 2, the top areas formed by the flaps 49 and 51 are seen to form a configuration extending laterally across the top opening. The notch 23, and the composite notch formed by edges 24 and 25 were provided in order that, as the side panels were folded as described, the sides of these notohes would swing together and fold over one another as seen in FIGURE 2.

Reference character 23 has been applied to the FIG- URE 2 as in FIGURE 9 showing the visible side of the overlap and the dotted outline indicated also by the reference character 23 indicates the other side of the notch .13. Likewise, the opposite side is shown by visible line 24 and phantom line 25. The material is overlapped to enable suitable adhesive bonds to be made along the seam, although bonding may be omitted if desired where the stiffness of the sheet is sufficient to hold the flaps in place.

The top 34 has a flared configuration, as best shown in FIGURES 1 and 4, by folding it about the score lines (FIGURE 2) and the top is thereby shaped so that a transverse channel is formed across it. This transverse channel is appropriate for receiving a lighted cigarette, and for providing a holding means for the cigarette when it is not in actual use. The top is usually not employed as a holding means except when employed as an ash tray. At other times, it is used as a funnel.

The bottom edge 22 is then folded up to form the closed bottom of the receptacle, and the folded edge is adhesively bonded to form a secure structure.

When the receptacle shown in FIGURES 14 is to be disposed in its collapsed condition, appropriate for shipping, or for the final extinguishrnen-t of its contents prior to disposal, the front and rear panels 12 and 14 are pressed together, causing the side panels 16 and 18 to fold inwardly along the score lines 40 and 42.

When the receptacle is in its collapsed condition, it is essentially fiat, and as mentioned above, is convenient for shipment, or for the final extinguishment of its contents prior to disposal.

On the other hand, when the receptacle is opened for use, the top flags are separated out until the receptacle assumes the shape shown in FIGURES l and 2. At the same time, the accordion-pleated side panels 16 and 18 move out to their illustrated positions, so that the article forms a receptacle having an inner cavity, and having an aperture 26 at its top defining an opening into the cavity for receiving the ashes, cigarette butts and the like.

The top flaps, as mentioned above, are now in position to funnel cigarette butts, and the like, into the cavity through the aperture; and they also now form the abovementioned channel for temporarily forming a rest for a burning cigarette. The channel shape of the top of the receptacle presents a convex configuration to the interior of the receptacle to trap the contents of the receptacle should the receptacle be tipped over.

As shown in FIGURES 7 and 8 the bottom of the receptacle may be formed to have a rectangular configuration, much in the same manner as is usual with paper sacks in presentday widespread use. For the latter configuration, the lower edges of the front and rear panels 12 and 14, and the lower edges of the side panels 16 and 18 are folded to form a bottom having a rectangular configuration, as shown in FIGURE 7, the particular bottom being designated as 22a.

As shown in FIGURE 7, when the receptacle is in its folded and essentially fiat condition, the bottom 22a may be folded up over the lower portion of the front panel 12. Then, when the receptacle is folded out to its open configuration, the bottom moves down to the position shown in FIGURE 8.

Further to add to the convenience of the receptacle of the invention, it may be secured, for example, to the side of a pack of cigarettes, as represented at 60 in FIGURE 9. In the assembly of FIGURE 9, the flexible receptacle, constructed in the manner of the embodiment described in FIGURES 1-5, is represented at 62, and is shown as adhesively secured to the side of the pack of cigarettes 60.

The invention provides, therefore, an improved flexible-type of disposable receptacle for semi-fluid and damp 6 waste matter as well as serving as a cigarette butt and ash receptacle. The receptacle of the invention is most advantageous in that it forms a positive and safe means for disposing of cigarette butts and the like without any danger of creating a fire hazard by such disposal.

The structure shown in FIGURE 5 is intended pri marily for small size containers. If the V notch 23 is not cut out, but folded, the bulkiness detracts from the appearance as well as the ability to fold.

Therefore, as the size of the bag increases, it becomes acceptable to leave the material in the V area and merely fold it into place. Thus, according to size, the V may be an actual notch 23, or a folded relief region 23a.

Also, as the side panels 16 and 18 are widened, it becomes desirable to adjust and extend the top edges to keep the overlapped condition, and maintain the desired objective of producing a basin top having four sides, each with a relief area, cut or folded, to produce a four panel folded top as illustrated and described.

While the instant invention has been shown and described herein in what is conceived to be the most practical and preferred embodiments, it is recognized that departures may be made therefrom within the scope of the invention which is therefore not to be limited to the de tails disclosed herein but is to be afforded the full scope of the claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A blank from which an expandable waste container may be folded, comprising, a generally rectangular sheet having a central panel area, first and second intermediate panel sections flanking said central panel area;

said central panel area providing one side wall of the container, said extreme end panel sections adapted to be joined to provide a composite side wall opposite said central panel;

said first and second intermediate panel sections each having a central fold crease dividing the panel into two substantially equal pleats;

said blank having atop edge defined by:

a V notch at the end of the said central panel area with the apex of the V substantially central of the panel; the edge of the extreme panel sections sloping outwardly and downwardly to thereby jointly define a V notch over the said composite side wall when joined; said intermediate panel section having long V shaped fold lines extending downwardly to an apex on said central fold crease;

whereby said blank may be folded by joining the said end panel sections, folding said crease of the intermediate panels inwardly up to the said apex of said V; creasing the upper portion above the apex into a double fold first outwardly and then doubled back upon itself to provide a top fold portion, thereby causing said end areas of the two side walls to also fold inwardly with the sides of the V notched overlapped to complete a folded top cover, said V form resulting in closed top with a central top opening.

2. In the blank defined in claim 1, said sheet having a substantially rectangular straight line edge which may be rolled upon itself to close the bottom of the container.

3. A waste container adapted for attachment to a flat wall, being collapsible into a flat pack and expandable into a wedge shaped container, said container being formed from a blank as defined in claim 1, said container having a recessed folded top structure with a central Opening lying on a plane passing through said central fold creases of the side panels.

4. A blank from which an expandable waste container may be folded, comprising, a generally rectangular foil sheet having a central panel area, first and second intermediate panel sections flanking said central panel area;

said central panel area providing one side wall of the container, said extreme end panel sections adapted to be joined to provide a composite side Wall opposite said central panel;

said first and second intermediate panel sections each having a central fold crease dividing the panel into two substantially equal pleats;

said blank having a top edge defined by:

a V relief region at the end of the said central panel area with the apex of the V substantially central of the panel; the edge of the extreme panel sections jointly defining a relief region over the said composite side wall when joined; said intermediate panel section having long V shaped fold lines extending downwardly to an apex on said central fold crease;

whereby said blank may be folded by joining the said end panel sections, folding said crease of the intermediate panels inwardly up to the said apex of said V; creasing the upper portion above the apex into a double fold first outwardly and then doubled back 8 upon itself to provide a top fold portion, thereby causing said end areas of the two side walls to also fold inwardly with the sides of the relief region overlapped to complete a folded top cover, said relief form resulting in closed top with a central top openmg.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,373,182 Fischer Mar. 29, 1921 1,722,465 Gray -n July 30, 1929 2,291,753 Patten Aug. 4, 1942 2,321,139 Gruger June 8, 1943 2,349,488 Dement May 23, 1944 2,966,294 Pelfrey Dec. 27, 1960

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1373182 *Nov 22, 1920Mar 29, 1921Philip A FischerDrinking-cup
US1722465 *Aug 4, 1927Jul 30, 1929Gray MaudeAdvertising novelty
US2291753 *May 6, 1938Aug 4, 1942Patten Tillman MarkReceptacle
US2321139 *Aug 19, 1940Jun 8, 1943Gruger Edward HCollapsible paper container
US2349488 *Apr 4, 1942May 23, 1944Dement Charles SCombination match book and emergency ash tray
US2966294 *Feb 3, 1959Dec 27, 1960PelfreyDisposal bag
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3471871 *Jan 31, 1967Oct 14, 1969Fairchild Hiller CorpWaste collection bags
US3561670 *Feb 25, 1969Feb 9, 1971Marcus SegalAshtrays and like smoker{3 s receptacles
US5988468 *Jan 14, 1998Nov 23, 1999Daymen Photo Marketing LtdExposed film container
US8601612May 14, 2004Dec 10, 2013Nike, Inc.Overlapping element
EP2255684A1 *May 12, 2005Dec 1, 2010Nike International LtdPocket with overlapping element
Classifications
U.S. Classification383/99, 383/36
International ClassificationB65D85/10, B65D33/16, B65D85/08, B65D33/24
Cooperative ClassificationB65D33/24, B65D2209/00, B65D85/1045
European ClassificationB65D85/10G4, B65D33/24