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Publication numberUS3123373 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 3, 1964
Filing dateSep 27, 1961
Publication numberUS 3123373 A, US 3123373A, US-A-3123373, US3123373 A, US3123373A
InventorsWesley T. Antcliff
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flexible ski-sled
US 3123373 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

FIG. .7

March 3, 1964 6 G. 4 I F TIG. 4

ATTORNEY United States Patent O 3,123,373 FLEXIBLE SKI-SLED Wesley T. Antcli, Jonesville, Mich. (P.o. BX 102, Hii1side,Mich) Filed Sept. 27, 1961, Ser. No. 141,049 7 Claims. (Cl. 280-12) This invention relates to a novel ski-sled having a flexible steerable ski runner.

The primary object of the invention is the provision of a more controllable maneuverable and more efficient ski-sled for down-hill coasting, on snow or ice, or for use as towed behind a power boat for water skiing, which affords the user greater opportunity for the exercise of skill and hence greater pleasure in its use.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a ski-sled of the character indicated above, which has a single ski-type runner, the runner being flexible and resilient and being adapted to be flexed laterally, for steering, and vertically, at its forward end, for varying the surface tension and contact area between the runner and the snow so as to control the speed ofthe ski-sled.

A further object of the invention is the provision of a ski-sled of the character indicated above, which is simple in construction, is composed of a small number of uncomplicated and easily assembled parts, and can be made in well-finished and rugged forms, at relatively low cost.

A further object of the invention is to provide a skisled which is usable both on land and water, which is provided with flotation means for water use and includes a seat which may be positioned between operating and storage positions.

Other important objects and advantageous features of the invention will be apparent from the following description and the accompanying drawings, where, for purposes of illustration only, a specific form of the invention is set v forth in detail.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of a ski-sled of the present invention, showing the seat thereof in normal operating position in full lines, and in the storage or transporting position in dotted lines,

FIG. 2 is a side elevation of said ski-sled, showing its runner in normal position in full lines, and in the upwardly flexed position in dotted lines,

FIG. 3 is a front end elevation of said ski-sled, showing the runner in normal position in full lines, and in flexed positions in dotted lines,

FIG. 4 is an elevational view of the ski-sled wherein the rider has shifted his weight forward to increase the supporting contact area of the runner,

FIG. 5 is an enlarged sectional side elevation of the seat structure taken along line V-V of FIG. l, and showing the flotation filler and seat positioning means,

FIG. 6 is a front elevational view of the seat taken along line VI*VI of FIG. 1, and

FIG. 7 is an enlarged sectional detail view of the steering handle and upper cable end.

Referring in detail to the drawings, wherein like numerals designate like parts throughout the several views, the illustrated ski-sled comprises a longitudinally and horizontally elongated runner 10, in the form of a flat, thin, and narrow flexible metal plate or blade, having a straight and normally flat rear portion 12, and an upwardly curved forward portion 14, the runner having a slight and uniform taper from the arcuate tip 16 of its forward end portion 14 to the junction of the forward and rear portions.

The seat assembly includes a preferably square cross section tubular seat post 18 afiixed to and rising perpendicularly from the rear portion 12 of the runner at a location nearer to the rear end of the runner than to its 3,123,373 Patented Mar. 3, 1964 forward portion 14. The post 18 may be of formed sheet material and is of a configuration having an upper surface portion 20 and an outwardly extending lower flange 22. The flange 22 is afiixed to the runner by bolts, rivets or the like.

A seat 24, which may be of wood, is mounted upon the surface 20 of the post 18 and is provided with hand hold slots 26. A bolt 28 is fixed in seat 24 and extends downwardly through a hole in surface 20. A nut 30 threaded to the end of the bolt 28 permits a compression spring 31 interposed between the nut and portion 20 to bias the seat downwardly whereby V projections 32 on the seat will be held in engagement with the V recesses 34 defined in the surface portion 20 to lock the position of the seat on the post 18. The recesses 34 are related to the projections 32 such that the seat will be locked in either the operative full line position of FIG. 1 or the storage or transporting position shown in dotted lines. The seat is positioned by turning the seat with a force sufllcient to cause the projections to ride up out of the recesses against the action of spring 31.

Steering land control of the ski-sled are accomplished by the flexing of the forward portion 14 of the runner. The runner is of such flexible nature that by means of a handle 36 associated with the tip 16 of the runner by means later described, the runner forward portion may be flexed in both the vertical and lateral directions. Also, the runner flexibility permits the supporting contact area of the runner to be varied whereby a reduction of the area may be produced to increase the coasting speed by reducing surface friction, or the effective supporting contact area of the runner may be increased when coasting over soft snow by the rider redistributing his feet and weight on the runner as in FIG. 4.

The runner 10 s maintained in the bowed full line position of FIG. 2 by means of a cord or cable 38 anchored to the seat post 18 by an open curl ring 40 and attached to the tip 16. The upper end of the cable 38 is inserted through the bore 44 of the handle 36, threaded through the holes 42 and againpassed through the handle bore and clamped by the conventional cable clamp 48. This arrangement will keep the handle disposed adjacent the tip 16 and transmit the control forces imposed on the handle to the tip and runner. The effective length of the cable may be easily adjusted by loosening the clamp 48 and sliding the cable in a known m-anner.

Preferably a plastic guard 50 is inserted over the tip 16 and this guard is provided with holes aligning with holes 42 whereby the cable will serve to maintain the guard on the runner.

In usual operation, the seat 24 will be in the full line position of FIG. 1 and the rider will sit upon the seat placing the feet in heel to toe relation upon the runner; the heel of the rear foot will touch, or approximately touch, the post 18. The handle 36 is grasped and the runner tip is pulled toward the rider to the dotted line position of FIG. 2. Thus, the handle Will be in the vicinity of the riders knees and readily movable to the right or left and up and down. Lateral flexing of the for- Ward portion 14, FIG. 3, by -the handle will permit positive steering as a selected side edge of the runner bites into the snow or ice while the other edge will -be elevated or banked By pulling the handle fur-ther toward the rider to lift more of the runner from the supporting surface, the supporting area and friction may be reduced to increase the `ski-sled speed. If soft `snow is encountered, the area may be increased by lowering the handle and shifting the feet to the position shown in FIG. 4. If desired, the handle may `be released and the operator will grasp the slots 26 to maintain balance.

It will .be appreciated that the exibility o1' the runner will permit an unusually high degree of control for devices of this nature and the type of ride produced will be largely determined by the skill of the rider.

For using the ski-sled in the water, a tow ring will be 4attached to the underside `of the portion 14 at the arcuate bow and the operator 4will exercise control in the man- 'nefr set forth above. For water use the interior of the post 18 will be lled with flotation means S2 suoh as styrof-oam.

Although there has been shown 'and described a prefer-red torni ot" the invention, t is to be understood that the invention is not necessarily luoniined thereto, and that any change or ehalrrges in the structure ot" and in the relative arrangements of components Vthereof are contemplated as being within the scope of the invention as defined by the appended hereto.

What is Volairne-d is:

l. A steerable `ski-.Sled comprising an elongated runner `having a main support portion and an upwardly oui-ved forward end portion termina-ting in a tip, said forward end portion being flexible and resilient, a flexible cord having a forwamd end secured to said forward end portion Iadiaeent to said tip and extending rearwardly along the run-ner, la `seat assembly fixed upon and rising from said malin por-tion, said cord being stretched between said forward end portion and said seat assembly, and a :handle mounted on said oord adjacent said tip, said seat yassembly comprising an opstanding post, and a transverse- Vly elongated seat mounted on the upper end of the post and rotatably position-able thereon.

2. A 'steer'able ski-sled capable of a high degree of maneuverability comprising, in combination, a thin, flexible broad blade runner having a rear portion and a forward portion capable of lateral flexing Vrelative to said rear portion terminating in a tip, an upwardly extending seat mounted upon said rear portion, and a handle associated with said tip whereby said tip and forward runner portion may be raised relative to said rear portion, and lateral exing of said tip and forward portion twists said forward portion relative to said rear portion.

3. In .a steerable skisled 'as in claim 2, wherein a tension member is afxed at one Aend to said tip and afxed at the other lend relative to said ruimer blade rear portion i maintaining said tip and forward portion bowed upwardly relative to -said runner rear portion.

4. A steerable ski-sled capable of a high degree of nraneuverability comprising, in combination, a thin, flexible, broad blade runner having a rear portion and a forward portion capable of lateral flexing relative to said rear portion terminating in a tip, an upwardly extending seat mounted upon said rear portion, a exible tension member affixed :at 'one end to said tip and aixed at the other end to said seat maintaining said tip and forward portion bowed upwardly relative to said runner rear portion, and a handle mounted on said tension member adjacent said runner tip whereby said tip and forward portion may be flexed relative to said rear portion, lateral iexing of said tip and forward portion twisting said forward portion relative to said rear portion.

5. in a steerable ski-sled as in claim 4, wherein said :seat includes a receptacle member and flotation means within said receptacle member.

6. A steerable ski-sled capable of a high degree of maneuverability comprising, in combination, a thin, ilexible, broad blade runner having a rear portion and a forward portion capable of being twisted relative to said rear portion, a tip defined ou said forward portion, a seat mounted lupon said rear portion, a tension member affixed at one end to said tip and attached at the other end to said seat maintaining said runner forward portion bowed upwardly relative to said rear portion, and a handle associated with `said tip whereby said tip and forward portion may be laterally dellected to ilex and twist said runner forward portion relative to said runner rear portion.

7. In a steerable ski-sled yas in claim 6, wherein said runner is of a normally planar configuration.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNTED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1569885 *Jul 9, 1923Jan 19, 1926Robblee Ide LSled
US2482554 *Jan 11, 1947Sep 20, 1949Ivar Nelson CarlSled
US2716246 *Jun 24, 1953Aug 30, 1955James R BillinghamWater ski
AT147871B * Title not available
GB191014246A * Title not available
NO54441A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3301569 *May 19, 1965Jan 31, 1967Broschart Harry LSki sled
US3374495 *Aug 22, 1967Mar 26, 1968William P. JoyceSurfboard nose bumper
US3435471 *Mar 10, 1967Apr 1, 1969Drennen Ralph B JrWater sport device
US3451689 *Oct 6, 1967Jun 24, 1969Owens Austin PSki sled
US4258910 *Sep 25, 1978Mar 31, 1981Carter John RFlexible foot extender
US6086101 *Jan 16, 1998Jul 11, 2000Cormican; Dale DewayneAdjustable flex ski apparatus
US6289833Oct 26, 2000Sep 18, 2001Gerry KirkDevice for moving an individual relative to a surface with the assistance of wind
US6331008Aug 7, 1998Dec 18, 2001Cormican Dale DewayneOne piece molded ski apparatus
US6368172Nov 17, 2000Apr 9, 2002Charles TravisWater glider
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/28.14, 441/72, D12/9, 297/311
International ClassificationB62B13/00, B62B13/04
Cooperative ClassificationB62B13/04, B62B13/043
European ClassificationB62B13/04B, B62B13/04