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Publication numberUS3123889 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 10, 1964
Filing dateDec 18, 1961
Priority dateDec 18, 1961
Also published asDE1560081B
Publication numberUS 3123889 A, US 3123889A, US-A-3123889, US3123889 A, US3123889A
InventorsTroy E. Watts
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Strand packagers
US 3123889 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

STRAND PACKAGERS 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTORS TROY E. WATTS ROBERT 6. WILSON 76mg M9 ATTORNEY T. E. WATTS ETAL March 10, 1964 Filed Dec. 18, 1961 March 1964 T. E. WATTS ETAL STRAND PACKAGERS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. 18, 1961 INVENTORS TROY E. WATTS ROBERT 6. WILSON ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,123,889 STRAND PAQKAGERS Troy E. Watts, Hartselie, and Robert G. Wilson, Mobile, Ala, assignors, by mesne assignments, to Monsanto Chemical Company, a corporation of Delaware Filed Dec. 18, 1961, Ser. No. 160,005 8 Claims. (Cl. 28-21) This invention relates to strand packagers and more particularly to apparatus for packaging a tow in a container.

In the manufacture of chemical fibers a spinning operation is used to simultaneously produce a group or bundle of filaments. One or more of these groups may be combined to form a tow. The tow is subjected to heat and/ or other treatment and is then fed through a crimping machine and into a container for shipment to a user. The appearance of the end product will be afiected greatly by the manner in which the tow is laid .into the container. Also, if the tow in the container becomes snarled or entangled the conversion of the tow to a finished product becomes much more diificult. If the tow is not carefully laid into the container, it is very likely that the filaments will become disarranged, separated or entangled. With this in mind, one of the objects of this invention is to provide a novel and improved strand packager.

Another object of this invention is to provide an apparatus for packaging a tow in a container.

Still another object of this invention is to provide an apparatus for laying a tow into a container without having the individual filaments in the tow become separated, entangled or snarled.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a tow packager having a ladder convey'or which cfeeds a tow into an oscillated and reciprocated piddler chute.

A further object of this invention is to provide a tow packager having a tow conveyor one end of which is traversed past a tow container and the other end of which is held to limited movement to receive the tow from a feed chute.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a tow packager having a piddler chute which is traversed in a first direction past a tow container and is simultaneously oscillated in a direction normal to the first direction.

One embodiment of the present invention contemplates a tow packager having a conveyor which advances a tow into an oscillating piddler chute mounted on a reciprocated carriage and positioned above a container. The end of the conveyor adjacent to the chute is carried by the carriage while the other end of the conveyor, onto which the tow is fed, is held substantially stationary. The chute is oscillated in onedirection as it is carried in a perpendicular direction by the reciprocating carriage. This causes the tow to be laid evenly and uniformly into the container.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent when the following detailed description is read in conjunction with the drawings, in which FIGURE 1 is a side view of a tow packager illustrating the principles of the invention and showing the general arrangement of the apparatus;

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged sectional view taken on line 2-2 of FIGURE 1' showing the supporting and guiding mechanism for the lower end of the conveyor;

FIGURE 3 is a sectional view taken on line 33 of FIGURE 1 showing the drive mechanisms for the carriage and the piddler chute; and

FIGURE 4 is a plan view of the apparatus showing the upper end of the conveyor at its central position.

Referring now in detail to the drawings, a frame 11 is shown supporting a carriage 12 which carries a piddler chute 13 and one end of a ladder conveyor, indicated generally by the reference numeral 14. A tow 17 is advanced upward along the conveyor 14 and then downward through the piddler chute 13 into a stationary, rectangular carton 18. I

The carriage 12 is provided with a plurality of rollers 22' which ride or roll along tracks 23 secured to the frame 11. The tracks 23 are'parallel to one dimension or side of the carton 18 so that movement of the carriage 12 is parallel to one dimension or side of the carton.

A bracket 24- secured to a housing 25 of the conveyor 14 at the upper or higher end of the conveyor is apertured to receive a post 26 secured to a bracket 27 (FIGURE 3) on the carriage 12. Thus, as the carriage 12 is reciprocated, the bracket 24 and the conveyor 14- are pivoted on the post 26. This pivoting is necessary for the reason 'that the lower end of the conveyor 14 is substantially stationary. Rollers 31 mounted on the frame 11 engage a flat lower surface of a bracket 31 secured to the lower end of the conveyor housing 25 for supporting this end of the conveyor. To insure that no lateral movement of the lower end of the conveyor 14 occurs, a pin 32 secured to the bracket 31 extends into a slot in the frame 11 and carries a bearing 33. The slot is defined by a pair of spaced vertical plates 34 and 35 secured to the frame 11 and positioned on opposite sides of the bearing 33. As the carriage 12 moves the upper end of the conveyor back and forth, the pin 32 will move in the slot 33 in a direction parallel to a chute 35 which is feeding the tow 17 onto the conveyor 14 and parallel to the direction of oscillation of the piddler chute 13. It is desirable that the lower end of the conveyor be held against lateral movement so that it remains in alignment with the feed chute 36.

The conveyor 14 includes a plurality of parallel bars 37 secured to and carried by a pair of parallel belts 38 which are supported by rollers 39 and 49 mounted on the conveyor housing 25. This arrangement is commonly known as a ladder conveyor. The rollers 49 are driven by a motor 44 supported below the housing 25 and acting through belts 45 and 46.

The piddler chute 13 is pivotally supported'by a bracket 50 which is secured to the carriage 12. The piddler chute 13 is oscillated by means of a link 51 which is pinned at one end to the chute '13 and at the other end to an endless belt 52 carried on pulleys 53 and 54 mounted on the carriage 12. A motor 53 drives the pulley 54 to move the belt 52 and thereby oscillate the piddler chute 13 in a direction perpendicular to the direction of movement of the carriage 12.

The carriage 12 is reciprocated by means of a link 62 which is pinned at one end to the carriage 12 and at the other end to an endless belt 59 carried on pulleys 6d and 61 secured to shafts 64 and 65, respectively, rotatably mounted on the frame 11. A motor 66 acts through a sprocket 69, a chain 71 and a sprocket 71 mounted on the shaft 64 to rotate the pulley 6i and thereby drive the belt 59' to reciprocate the carriage 12.

In operation of the apparatus, the tow 17 is fed from the feed chute 36 onto the lower end of the conveyor 14, the tow resting on and being carried by the parallel bars 37. The tow leaves the upper end of the conveyor and passes downward through the piddler chute 13 into the container 18.

The motor 58 drives the belt 52 to oscillate the piddler chute 13 as the motor 66 drives the belt 59 to reciprocate the carriage 12 carrying the chute 13. The piddler chute 13 is thus oscillated in a first direction parallel to one side of the container while it is reciprocated by the carriage 12 along a path parallel to another side of the container, the oscillation of the piddler chute being in a direction normal to the direction of movement of the carriage. This lays the tow 17 into the container 18 in uniform, even layers in such a manner that tangling, opening of the tow, etc., are prevented.

It is to be understood that the embodiment of the invention disclosed herein is merely illustrative and may be modified or amended and that numerous other embodiments may be contemplated which will fall w thin the spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A strand packager, comprising a frame, track means on the frame forming a straight path, a carriage mounted on the frame for movement along the track means, a conveyer having one end thereof mounted on the carriage for movement therewith and the other end thereof substantially fixed to the frame, a piddler chute mounted on the carriage for oscillation in a direction normal to said track means, and means for simultaneously reciprocating the carriage and oscillating the chute.

2. A strand packager, comprising a frame, track means on the frame forming a straight path, a carriage mounted on the frame for reciprocation along the track means,

a conveyer having one end thereof mounted on the carriage for movement therewith and the other end thereof mounted on the frame, means for feeding a strand onto said other end of the conveyer, a piddler chute mounted on the carriage for oscillation in a direction normal to said track means, and means for simultaneously reciprocating the carriage and oscillating the piddler chute.

3. A strand packager, comprising a frame, a straight track mounted on the frame, a carriage mounted for reciprocation along the track, means on the frame for reciprocating the carriage, a strand conveyer having one end thereof pivotally connected to the carriage for movement therewith and the other end thereof mounted on the frame, means for driving the conveyer, a piddler chute mounted on the carriage for oscillation in a direction normal to said track, and means on the conveyer for oscillating the piddler chute.

4. A strand packager, comprising a frame, a straight track mounted on the frame, a carriage mounted for reciprocation along the track, a strand conveyer interconnecting the carriage and a point on the frame so that reciprocation of the carriage oscillates the conveyer about said point, means for feeding a strand onto the conveyer, means for driving the conveyer to advance the strand therealong, a piddler chute mounted on the carriage for oscillation in a direction normal to said track for receiving the strand from the conveyer, and means on the carriage for oscillating the piddler chute.

5. A strand packager, comprising a frame, a straight track mounted on the frame, a carriage having a plurality of rollers positioned on the track for guiding said carriage along a straight path, means on the frame for reciprocating the carriage along said straight path, a strand conveyer having one end pivotally mounted on the carriage and the other end pivotally and slidably mounted on the frame at a location spaced from the carriage so that reciprocation of the carriage oscillates said one end of the conveyer about said location, a piddler chute mounted on the carriage for oscillation in a direction normal to said straight track, and means on the carriage for oscillating the piddler chute simultaneously with reciprocation of the carriage.

6. A device for packaging a tow, comprising a frame, a carriage mounted fon movement along a path on the frame, a roller mounted on the frame at a point spaced laterally from said path, a tow conveyer having one end thereof positioned on the roller and the other end thereof pivotally supported on the carriage, means on the frame for guiding said one end of the conveyer for movement in a direction normal to said path, means for feeding a tow onto said one end of the conveyer, means for driving the conveyer to advance the tow therealong, a piddler chute mounted on the carriage for oscillation in a direction normal to said path, means on the carriage for oscillating the chute, and means on the frame for reciprocating the carriage simultaneously with oscillation of the chute.

7. An apparatus for packaging a tow, comprising a frame, a carriage mounted on the frame for reciprocation along a path, a plurality of rollers mounted on the frame at a location spaced laterally from said path, means on the frame adjacent to the rollers defining a slot extending in a direction normal to said path, a tow conveyer having one end thereof positioned on the rollers and the other end thereof pivotally supported on the carriage, means on said one end of the conveyer extending into said slot for guiding said one end for movement in a direction normal to said path, means for feeding a tow onto said one end of the conveyer, means for driving the conveyer to advance the tow therealong, a piddler chute pivotally attached at one end thereof to the carriage for receiving the tow from the conveyer, means on the frame for reciprocating the carriage to oscillate said other end of the conveyer, and means on the carriage for oscillating the other end of the piddler chute simultaneously with oscillation of the conveyer.

8. A tow packager, comprising a frame, a carriage mounted on the frame for reciprocation along a path on the frame, a pair of spaced rollers mounted on the frame at a location spaced laterally from the midpoint of said path, a pair of parallel plates secured to the frame between the rollers to define a guide slot extending in a direction normal to said path, a post secured to the carriage, a tow conveyer having one end thereof resting on the rollers and the other end thereof pivotally attached to the post on the carriage, a pin attached to said one end of the conveyer and extending into said guide slot for guiding said one end of the conveyer for movement in a direction normal to said path, means for feeding a tow onto said one end of said conveyer, means carried by the conveyer for driving said conveyer to advance the tow therealong, a bracket secured to the conveyer, a

iddler chute pivotally secured at the upper end thereof to the bracket for receiving the tow from the conveyer, a first endless belt mounted on the frame and having spans parallel to said path, means on the frame for driving said first endless belt, a first link interconnecting the carriage and a point on the first endless belt so that movement of said first belt reciprocates the carriage along said path, a second endless belt mounted on the carriage and having spans normal to said path, means on the carriage for driving the second endless belt, and a second link interconnecting the chute and a point on the second endless belt so that movement of said second belt oscillates the lower end of the chute in a direction normal to said path.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,960,208 Sibley et al Nov. 15, 1960

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2960208 *Mar 5, 1956Nov 15, 1960Chain Belt CoConcrete paving distributor
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3341911 *Nov 12, 1965Sep 19, 1967Eastman Kodak CoApparatus for packaging crimped materials
US3377675 *Aug 15, 1966Apr 16, 1968Du PontApparatus for depositing tow
US3408713 *Jan 24, 1966Nov 5, 1968Chemcell Ltd Chemcell LimiteePreparation of filter tow
US3423807 *Feb 16, 1966Jan 28, 1969CrylorApparatus for the layering of tow
US3499522 *Dec 15, 1967Mar 10, 1970United States Steel CorpLoading apparatus
US3964849 *Apr 23, 1975Jun 22, 1976Heijiro FukudaMold apparatus for continuously producing laminated resinoid material
US4047365 *Aug 25, 1975Sep 13, 1977Suggs Charles WAutomatic leaf spreader for a tobacco harvester
US4856640 *Jul 17, 1987Aug 15, 1989The West CompanyStopper elevator conveyor
US4872544 *Feb 9, 1988Oct 10, 1989Macmillan Bloedel LimitedApparatus for oriented strand lay-up
US5054603 *Aug 4, 1989Oct 8, 1991Macmillan Bloedel, LimitedApparatus for laying elongate members
US7228604 *Apr 28, 2006Jun 12, 2007American Linc CorporationSystem, apparatus, and method of reducing production loss having compressor
Classifications
U.S. Classification28/289, 198/526, 198/536, 198/587, 198/535
International ClassificationB65H54/78
Cooperative ClassificationB65H2701/31, B65H54/78
European ClassificationB65H54/78