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Publication numberUS3124427 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 10, 1964
Filing dateApr 26, 1961
Publication numberUS 3124427 A, US 3124427A, US-A-3124427, US3124427 A, US3124427A
InventorsHarry Chomes
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tkrough-wall flashing structures having
US 3124427 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 10, 1964 H. CHOMES THROUGH-WALL FLASHING STRUCTURES HAVING IFIG.4

INVENTOR. HARRY CHOMES BY 4% I fl TTORNEY.

United States Patent 3 124 427 THROUGH-WALL I LA HING STRUCTURES HA-VWG A SPECIFIC GROOVE GE- MENT Harry Chomes, 29 Jameson Road, Newton 58, Mass. Filed Apr. 26, 1961, Ser. No. 105,749 11 Claims. (Cl. 29-183) This invention relates to improved through-wall flashing structures and to a novel material from which such flashing can be formed.

Through-wall flashing comprises generally flexible corrosion-resistant sheets which are formed into structures of appropriate shapes and sizes and built into exterior walls foundations and window structures-for water-proofing and damp-proofing purposes. Such flashing acts as a barrier and drainage course for water seepage and is used for waterproofing such portions of a building as, for example, spandrels, window heads and window sills, parape-ts and tops of foundations. Modern masonry Walls, which are usually thin curtain walls, in particular require such water-proofing since driving rain, shrinkage of materials and building movement can cause leaks through mortar joints. The through-Wall flashing is embedded in the wall to prevent rain water or moisture that may leak into the exterior wall from coming in contact with steel or wood members in the wall and seeping into the inside of the building.

Various through-wall flashing materials are currently in use. These include, for example, copper sheet and thin copper foil laminated or backed with a bituminousirnpregnated web. The copper sheet as sold commercially is usually corrugated or ridged in a parallel form -to provide strength, aid in bonding to the mortar and avoid the cracking caused by expansion and contraction. However, previously described flashing materials have one or more disadvantages which tend to limit their use in building construction. Thus, for example, pure copper is quite expensive While the less expensive thin copper-clad backings or reinforcedasphalt areuot as durable. Thick-copper sheets are difficult for the roofer to form while thin copper sheets tend to crack moreeasily. Other metals or alloys which are resistant to water are affected by the alkaline exudate of mortar.

Further, regardless of the nature of the material used, previously described flashing materials, when formed into flashing structures in a building, often tend toaccurnulate internal pools of moisture which do not drain and hence cause perforations or separations of the flashing structure.

One object of this invention is to provide an inexpensive, durable, flexible flashing material which can be readily used by the builder for through-wall flashing.

A further object of this invention is to provide such flashing which has an effective mortar bond under all installation conditions and will resist the forces of exmade in accordance with this invention.

FIG. 2 is an enlargement of a portion of PEG. 1. FIG. 3 is a section 33 of a portion of FIG. 2. FIG. 4 is a vertical section of a flashing structuremade from the'strip of this invention and installed in a window head.

This invention comprises generally a rectangular strip "ice of flexible water-resistant material having spaced, nonin-tersecting grooves on its top surface and corresponding ridges on its bottom surface. The grooves are arranged in two sets of parallel bands, all of uniform width. Each band of one set alternates with and is adjacent to a band of the second set. Each band has a uniform array of grooves extending the length of the band. All bands have uniform longitudinal margins which are flat on both surfaces. The spacing between adjacent grooves is uniform in all bands. All the grooves in one-set of bands are disposed at a first identical angle of less than with respect -to the width of the strip. All the grooves in the second set are at a second identical angle which is the supplement of .the first angle. It is -generally preferred that the first angle be between 15 and 75.

The flashing structure is made by cutting the strip transversely and longitudinally to form a piece of appropriate size and shape and then bending the piece into the desired form for insertion into the building structure.

In particular, it has been found most effective to have the. bands make an angle of approximately 60 with the width of the strip and have the groove angle of one set of bands be 60 with the width of the strip, the groove angles of the other set of bands forming anangle of with the width of the strip, giving the general appearance of equilateral triangles.

As regards the material from which the strip is made it can be any durable water-resistant material of sufficient flexibility for bending into the shape of a flashing structure. However, it is generally preferred that it be a metal as, for example, copper, zinc, alloy, aluminum, galvanized iron, etc. Copper is generally regarded as the most durable of water-resistant flexible metals but ;;it is an important feature of this invention that copper-need not be used. Thus, both surfaces of the metal canbe coated with a resistant coating which will withstand the action of the common exudates in masonry structures such as 1bases. Among the resistant coating bases that can be used are thermo-plastic polymers such as epoxy resins, acrylic resins and vinyl copolymers. Where metals other than copper are used it is important that such resistant coating be employed.

Referring now to the drawings, FIG. 1 illustrates the top surface of a rectangular strip of approximately 2 feet wide and 4 feet long made in accordance with this in- 'vention. The scale is "-one foot. The surface. comprises parallel adjacent alternating uniform-width bands each forming an angle of 60 with the width of the strip. The bands 11 alternate with the bands 13. The grooves 12 in the bands 11 are parallel to each other and to the long dimension of the bands and extend thelength of the band. The grooves 14 in the bands 13 are .parallel ,to each other but are at a 60 angle with the long dimension of the bands, and 120 with the width ofthe strip. The longitudinal mar-gins of the bands are flat on both surfaces and are of uniform width.

As illustrated in FIGURE 3, the strip, which in this case ,is an essentially non-cuprous water-resistant metal, such as galvanized iron, zinc alloy or aluminum, is coated with a liquid-resistant coating 15 on the top surface and 16 on the bottom surface.

A portion 23 of the strip is cut and bent to form a flashing structure as illustrated in FIGURE 4. The flashing is set into the window head structure with its brick exterior wall 21, interior wooden framing 22, interior wall 24 and window 25. Any moisture that comes down onto the flashing from any direction is conducted to the outside with the aid of the singularly-disposed grooves.

Because of the groove and ridge construction ofthis invention not only is drainage superior, but bonding'of the flashing "to the mortar is markedly improved. :Further, relatively inexpensive water-resistant flexible metals such as zinc, zinc alloy, aluminum and galvanized iron 7 can be used in this invention to yield a durable product.

I claim:

1. A rectangular strip of flexible water-resistant metal having spaced, non-intersecting grooves on its top surface and 7 corresponding ridges on its bottom surface; the grooves being arranged as arrays in two sets of parallel bands; each band of one set alternating with and being adjacent to a band of the second set; the array of grooves in any band extending the length of the band; the spacing between adjacent grooves being uniform in all hands; all bands being of uniform width and having uniform logitudinal margins which are flat on both surfaces; all the grooves in one set being at a first identical angle of less than 90 with respect to the width of the strip; all the grooves in the second set being at a second identical angle which is the supplement to said first angle.

2. A rectangular strip of flexible water-resistant material having spaced, non-intersecting grooves on its top surface and corresponding ridges on its bottom surface; the grooves being arranged as arrays in two sets of parallel bands; a band of one set alternating with and being adjacent to a band of the second set; the array of grooves in any band extending the length of the band; the spacing between adjacent grooves being uniform in all bands; all bands being of uniform width and having uniform longitudinal margins which are flat on both surfaces; all the grooves in one set being at a first identical angle of less than 90 with respect to the width of the strip; all the grooves in the second set being at a second identical angle which is the supplement to said first angle; said strip comprising metal coated on both surfaces with a base-resistant coating.

3. A rectangular strip of flexible water-resistant material having spaced, non-intersecting grooves on its top surface and corresponding ridges on its bottom surface; the grooves being arranged as arrays in two sets of parallel bands; a band of one set alternating with and being adjacent to a band of the second set; the array of grooves in any band extending the length of the band; the spacing between adjacent grooves being uniform in all bands; all bands being of uniform width and having uniform longitudinal margins which are flat on both surfaces; all the grooves in one set being at a first identical angle of less than 90 with respect to the width of the strip; all the grooves in the second set being at a second identical angle which is the supplement to said first angle; said strip comprising metal coated on both surfaces with a coating having as its base a resin selected from the group consisting of epoxy, acrylic and vinyl resins.

4. A flashing structure formed frorn a rectangular strip of flexible water-resistant metal having spaced, non-inter- :secting grooves on its top surface and corresponding ridges on its bottom surface; the grooves being arranged as arrays in two sets of parallel bands; a band of one set alternating with and being adjacent to a band of the second set; the array of grooves in any band extending the length of the band; the spacing between adjacent grooves being uniform in all bands; all bands being of uniform width and having uniform longitudinal margins which are flat on both surfaces; all the grooves in one set being at a first identical angle of less than 90 with respect to the width of the strip; all the grooves in the second set being at a second identical angle which is the .supplement to said first angle.

5. A flashing structure formed from a rectangular strip of flexible water-resistant material having spaced, nonintersecting grooves on its top surface and corresponding ridges on its bottom surface; the grooves being arranged as arrays in two sets of parallel bands; at band of one set alternating with and being adjacent to a band of the second set; the array of grooves in any band extending the length of the band; the spacing between adjacent grooves being uniform in all hands; all bands being of uniform width and having uniform longitudinal margins which are flat on both surfaces; all the grooves in one set being d at a first identical angle of less than with respect to the width of the strip; all the grooves in the second set being at a second identical angle which is the supplement to said first angle, said strip comprising metal coated on both surfaces with a base-resistant coating.

6. A flashing structure formed from a rectangular strip of flexible water-resistant material having spaced, nonintersecting grooves on its top surface and corresponding ridges on its bottom surface; the grooves being arranged as arrays in two sets of parallel bands; a band of one set alternating with and being adjacent to a band of the second set; the array of grooves in any band extending the length of the band; the spacing between adjacent grooves being uniform in all bands; all bands being of uniform width and having uniform longitudinal margins which are flat on both surfaces; all the grooves in one set being at a first identical angle of less than 90 with respect to the width of the strip; all the grooves in the second set being at a second identical angle which is the supplement to said first angle; said strip comprising metal coated on both surfaces with a coating having as its base a resin selected from the group consisting of epoxy, acrylic and vinyl resins.

7. A rectangular strip of flexible water-resistant metal having spaced non-intersecting grooves on its top surface and corresponding ridges on its bottom surface; the grooves being arranged as arrays in two sets of parallel bands; each band of one set alternating with and being adjacent to a band of the second set; the array of grooves in any band extending the length of the band; the spacing between adjacent grooves being uniform in all bands; the bands forming an angle of about 60 with the width of the strip; all bands being of uniform width and having longitudinal margins which are flat on both surfaces; all the grooves in one set being at an angle of about 60 with respect to the width of the strip; all the grooves in the other set being at an angle of about with respect to the width of the strip.

8. A rectangular strip of flexiblewater-resistant material having spaced non-intersecting grooves on its top surface and corresponding ridges on its bottom surface; the grooves being arranged as arrays in two sets of parallel bands; each band of one set alternating with and being adjacent to a band of the second set; the array of grooves in any band extending the length of the band; the spacing between adjacent grooves being uniform in all bands; the bands forming an angle of about 60 with the width of the strip; all bands being of uniform width and having longitudinal margins which are flat on both surfaces; all the grooves in one set being at an angle of about 60 with respect to the width of the strip; all the grooves in the other set being at an angle of about 120 with respect to the width of the strip; said strip comprising metal coated on both surfaces with a base-resistant coating.

9. A flashing structure formed from a rectangular strip of flexible water-resistant metal having spaced non-intersecting grooves on its top surface and corresponding ridges on its bottom surface; the grooves being arranged as arrays in two sets of parallel bands; each band of one set alternating with and being adjacent to a band of the second set; the array of grooves in any band extending the length of the band; the spacing between adjacent grooves being uniform in all bands; the bands forming an angle of about 60 with the width of the strip; all bands being of uniform width and having longitudinal margins which are fiat on both surfaces; all the grooves in one set being at an angle of about 60 with respect to the width of the strip; all the grooves in the other set being at an angle of about 120 with respect tovthe width of the strip.

10. A flashing structure formed from a rectangular strip of flexible water-resistant material having spaced non-intersecting grooves on its top surface and corresponding ridges on its bottom surface; the grooves being arranged as arrays in two sets of parallel bands; each band of one set alternating with and being adjacent to a band of the second set; the array of grooves in any band extending the length of the band; the spacing between adjacent grooves being uniform in all bands; the bands forming an angle of about 60 with the width of the strip; all bands being of uniform width and having longitudinal margins which are flat on both surfaces; all the grooves in one set being at an angle of about 60 with respect to the width of the strip; all the grooves inthe other set being at an angle of about 120 with respect to the Width of the strip; said strip comprising metal coated on both surfaces with a base-resistant coating.

11. A rectangular strip of durable, water-resistant masecond set; the array of grooves in any band extending the length ot'the band; the spacing between adjacent grooves being uniform in all hands; all bands being of References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,906,674 Voegeli May 2, 1933 2,076,990 Harriss Apr. 13, 1937 2,271,233 Smith et-al Jan. 27, 1942 2,802,897 Hurd et al Aug. 13, 1957

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1906674 *May 3, 1932May 2, 1933American Brass CoThrough wall flashing
US2076990 *Aug 18, 1932Apr 13, 1937Cheney CompanyFlashing
US2271233 *Sep 1, 1938Jan 27, 1942Gen ElectricInsulated electrical counductor
US2802897 *Jul 18, 1952Aug 13, 1957Gen ElectricInsulated electrical conductors
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4485600 *Feb 12, 1982Dec 4, 1984Olson Jerome ACompressible spacing and sealing apparatus for siding panel joints
US4528787 *Mar 26, 1984Jul 16, 1985Christer RittingeBase plate system
US4966819 *Jan 11, 1989Oct 30, 1990Vereinigte Aluminum-Werke AgLead and aluminum layers, flashing
US5381632 *May 3, 1993Jan 17, 1995Damron; MatthewChimney flashing system
US5692347 *Aug 5, 1996Dec 2, 1997Hulek; Anton J.For covering a wall, ceiling or roof
US6427390Oct 18, 2000Aug 6, 2002F. Boyce ThiesFoundation flashing for use in building construction
US7040061Sep 2, 2003May 9, 2006Solatube International, Inc.Tubular skylight with dome flashing and protective corrugation
US7059087 *Jan 7, 2004Jun 13, 2006Allen L RossCorner flashing for windows and the like
US7100331 *Jun 3, 2002Sep 5, 2006Walter Wayne NehringDirectional flow flashing
US7168211 *Aug 5, 2004Jan 30, 2007Solatube International, Inc.Tubular skylight with dome flashing and protective waffle pattern corrugation
US7290379Mar 30, 2006Nov 6, 2007Allen L RossCorner flashing for windows and the like
US7762040Dec 29, 2004Jul 27, 2010Progressive Foam Technologies, Inc.Insulated fiber cement siding
US7775004Mar 20, 2007Aug 17, 2010Allen L RossSill flashing and associated method
US7836640 *Mar 20, 2006Nov 23, 2010Pratt James MWater drainage system
US8091313 *Oct 14, 2004Jan 10, 2012Progressive Foam Technologies, Inc.Drainage place for exterior wall product
US8448386Dec 10, 2010May 28, 20132Fl Enterprises, LlcWindow remediation system and method
US8490338 *Feb 24, 2011Jul 23, 2013Henkel CorporationSelf adhering window flashing tape with multi-directional drainage plane
US8499517Jul 20, 2011Aug 6, 2013Progressive Foam Technologies, Inc.Insulated fiber cement siding
US8511030Jul 20, 2011Aug 20, 2013Progressive Foam Technologies, Inc.Insulated fiber cement siding
US8756891Jul 20, 2011Jun 24, 2014Progressive Foam Technologies, Inc.Insulated fiber cement siding
US20110209424 *Feb 24, 2011Sep 1, 2011Henkel CorporationSelf adhering window flashing tape with multi-directional drainage plane
WO2006022843A1 *Feb 28, 2005Mar 2, 2006Solatube International IncTubular skylight with dome flashing and protective waffle pattern corrugation
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/603, D25/163, 52/62, 52/61
International ClassificationE04B1/64
Cooperative ClassificationE04B1/644
European ClassificationE04B1/64D