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Publication numberUS3125104 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 17, 1964
Filing dateDec 12, 1961
Publication numberUS 3125104 A, US 3125104A, US-A-3125104, US3125104 A, US3125104A
InventorsEdward J. Tryon
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin dispenser
US 3125104 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 17, 1964 E. J. TRYON COIN DISPENSER Filed Dec. 12, 1961 Fig. 1.

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Fig. 2. EDWARD J. TRYON Xmvm/ 21AM I'M d/l/au/ AHarne s United States Patent Ofi ice 3,125,104 Patented Mar. 17., 1964 3,125,104 COIN DISPENSER Edward J. Tryon, Trafalgar, Ind., assignor to Standard Change-Makers, 1110., Indianapolis, End, a corporation of Indiana Filed Dec. 12, 1961, Ser. No. 158,702 6 Claims. (Cl. 133-5) The present invention relates to a dispensing device and finds important utility in a coin dispenser, for example, forming a part of an automatic change maker.

Conventional automatic changer makers usually incorporate a slidable element having a circular aperture therethrough which receives the coin for movement between one location and another. In order to keep the cost of such dispensers relatively low, manufacturers frequently provide intermittent duty solenoids for moving the apertured slidable element from the one location to the other. In certain cases, children will operate the change maker continuously in such a manner as to convert a dime into two nickels and the two nickels back into a dime. After approximately three to five minutes of such continuous operation, the intermittent duty solenoid will be burned out. Consequently, one object of the present invention is to provide an automatic change maker constructed to make possible the use of continuous duty solenoids at no increase in cost.

A further object of the present invention is to provide an improved dispensing device.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a coin dispenser which requires substantially less force to operate than conventional coin dispensers.

Related objects and advantages will become apparent as the description proceeds.

One embodiment of the present invention comprises a coin dispenser having a base and a vertical tube mounted on the base for holding a vertical stack of coins. There is also provided a stop element fixed with relation to the base adjacent the bottom of the tube and having an upwardly facing surface spaced from the bottom of the tube by a distance equal to the thickness of one of the coins. A push rod having an upwardly curved end thereon is reciprocally mounted with relation to the base and is positioned to slidably rake the lower end of the stack to push the lowermost coin in the stack away from the stack.

The full nature of the invention will be understood from the accompanying drawings and the following description and claims.

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of a portion of an automatic change maker incorporating the coin dispenser of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a vertical section taken along the line 2-2 of FIG. 1 in the direction of the arrows and showing the details of a coin dispenser embodying the present invention.

' FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a tube and tube mounting block forming a part of the structure of FIGS. 1 and 2.

For the purposes of promoting an understanding of the principles of the invention, reference will now be made to the embodiment illustrated in the drawing and specific language will be used to describe the same. It will nevertheless be understood that no limitation of the scope of the invention is thereby intended, such alterations and further modifications in the illustrated device, and such further applications of the principles of the invention as illustrated therein being contemplated as would normally occur to one skilled in the art to which the invention relates.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings, there is illustrated an automatic change maker having a plurality of vertical tubes 11 and 12 mounted thereon, the tubes 11 being of a sufficient diameter to receive nickels while the tubes 12 are of an appropriate diameter for receiving dimes. Each of the tubes 11 and 12 has a vertical slot 15 formed therein which extends substantially the complete length of the tube with the exception of the lower portion 16 thereof. The slot 15 makes possible the removal of coins from the tube if desired.

Each of the tubes 11 and 12 has fixed to its lower end a tube mounting block 17. Each block 17 has a transverse horizontal slot 20 formed in the rearward surface 21 thereof, said slot receiving a horizontal bar 22 which is fixed at its opposite ends to a base 25. Each of the mounting blocks 17 is further fixed to the base 25 by means of a knurl headed screw 26 having its threaded portion 27 extending through a suitable threaded aperture in a horizontal rod 30 fixed to the base 25. Each of the screws 26 may be tightened into a suitable insert 31 mounted in the forward portion 32 of the mounting block 17. Fixed to the bottom of each mounting block 17 is a spacer 35 and a pair of members 36 which together make up a stop means or element for the stack of coins 33 received within the tube 12. The members 36 have a pair of inwardly projecting portions 37 which are spaced from the bottom edge 40 of the tube 12 and from the bottom surface 41 of the mounting block 17 by a distance approximately equal to and possibly slightly greater than the thickness of each individual coin in the stack 38. The projections 37 and the elements 36 are so formed as to define part-circular recesses 42 within which the lowermost coin in the stack 37 will be received.

It will be understood that the various coin dispensers disclosed in FIG. 1 in making up the automatic change maker are either similar or identical and therefore, the endmost coin dispenser, as disclosed in FIG. 2, will be exclusively described below but should be considered as representative. Fixed to the lower surface of the base 25 is a solenoid 45 having an armature 4610 which is connected a vertical member 47 which extends upwardly through a recess 50 in a double-pronged push rod 51. The push rod 51 has two prongs 52, each of which has a slightly upwardly inclined distal end portion 55 which normally bears against the lower surface of the member 35 when the push rod is in the position of FIGS. 1 and 2.

The push rod 51 is slidably received between a pair of horizontally extending bars 56 which are fixed to the base and in spaced relation by means of spacers 57 and bolts 60. The bars 56 function as guides in that the mutually facing surfaces 61 of the bars limit vertical movement of the push rod 51. A tension spring 62 is connected to the end of the push rod 51 and to the base 25 and extends downwardly from the push rod in such a manner as to urge the rear-ward end 64 of the push rod downwardly and the forward or distal ends 55 upwardly. Since the guide assembly provided by the horizontal bar 56 acts as a fulcrum, the distal end 55 yieldably and resiliently engages the member 35 under the action of the tension spring 62.

A further tension spring 65 is connected at one end to the armature and at the other end to the base 25 and normally yieldably holds the armature 46, the vertical member 47 and the push rod 51 in the illustrated retracted position of FIG. 2 when the solenoid 45 is not energized.

When the solenoid 45 is energized, the armature 46, the member 47 and the push rod 51 are urged leftwardly as viewed in FIGS. =1 and 2 causing the distal ends 55 of the push rod to rake across the member 35 and the lower end of the stack of coins 37, pushing the lowermost coin 66 leftwardly to a position at which it drops away from the stack and from the illustrated structure through the opening 67 defined by the base 25, the block 17 and stop means 36.

Referring to FIG. 1, it can be appreciated that the two tubes 11 lowermost on the drawing are a part of a device for providing two nickels in return for a dime while the tube 12 uppermost on the drawing is a part of a device for providing a dime for two nickels. Thus, as mentioned above, children conceivably could repeatedly operate the device, changing a dime into two nickels and then procuring a dime in return for the two nickels. Because the present device requires a relatively small force to move the push rod leftwardly, as viewed in FIG. 2, the solenoid 45 may be a continuous duty solenoid having the same cost as an intermittent duty solenoid of the type used in conventional automatic change makers. The push rod d requires a relatively small force because of the fact that only the relatively small upper edge 70 of the push rod frictionally engages the member 35 and the stack during the projection of the push rod. Thus, a relatively small frictional force is created resisting such movement. Of course, the push rod also engages the surfaces of the transverse bars 56 and especially the lower bar 56. However, the frictional force produced by the latter engagement may be adjusted to a relatively low value by use of a spring 62, capable of exerting a relatively low force. If desired, suitable means for lubricating the mutually facing surfaces of the members 56 may be provided.

It will also be noted that as the push rod moves leftwardly, the force exerted against the lower face of the stack of coins will be less as the moment arm about the fulcrum 56 increases. This is also desirable because it reduces the friction which must be overcome to move the push rod. Because of the reduced frictional forces in the present structure, the spring 65 may be selected to exert a relatively low force, yet still be capable of returning the push rod and member 47 and the armature 46 to the illustrated position. Since the spring 65 may be of a relatively weak type, the solenoid 45 may be one capable of exerting quite a bit smaller force than conventional solenoids used in the present type of application. This is true not only because the frictional forces necessary to overcome are less but also because the force of the spring 65 necessary to be overcome is less. Thus, the sum of these forces is much less than in conventional equipment.

Referring to FIG. 1, the dispenser assemblies each including the push rods 71, 72 and 73 are each similar to the dispenser assembly includingthe push rod 51 but differ in that they include three, five, and one prong, respectively. The push rod 71 operates by its own solenoid to provide two dimes and a nickel for a quarter, the push rod 72 by its own solenoid to provide five dimes for a fifty cent piece and the push rod 73- by its own solenoid to provide one dime for two nickels.

From the above description, it will be clear that the present invention provides an improved dispensing device. It will also be clear that the present invention makes possible the use of a continuous duty solenoid in an automatic change maker without increasing the cost of the solenoid. It will further be evident that the present invention pro vides a coin dispenser which requires substantially less force to operate than conventional coin dispensers.

While the invention has been illustrated and described in detail in the drawings and foregoing description, the same is to be considered as illustrative and not restrictive in character, it being understood that only the preferred embodiment has been shown and described and that all changes and modifications that come 'within the spirit of the invention and the scope of the claims are also desired to be protected.

The invention claimed is:

l. A dispenser comprising a base, a guide mounted on said base for holding a stack of objects, stop means positioned adjacent said guide and sufiiciently closely thereto so that the endmost object of said stack is positioned just outside of said guide by urging said stack against said stop means, a push rod reciprocal in a given direction with relation to said base, said push rod having two opposite ends one of which is positioned to slidably rake the lower end of said stack to push the lowermost object in said stack away from said stack, guide means fixed to said base and having two mutually facing surfaces between 'which said push rod extends, a spring acting between said base and the other end of said push rod and urging said one end of said push rod toward said stack with said guide means as a fulcrum.

2. A coin dispenser comprising a base, a vertical tube mounted on said base for holding a vertical stack of coins, stop means for positioning the lowermost coin of said stack just below said tube, a push rod having an upwardly curved end thereon and reciprocal in a given direction with respect to said base, said push rod having two opposite ends one of which is positioned to slidably rake the lower end of said stack to push the lowermost coin in said stack away from said stack, guide means fixed to said base and having two mutually facing surfaces between which said push rod extends, a spring acting between said base and the other end of said push rod and urging said one end of said push rod toward said stack with said guide means as a fulcrum.

3. A coin dispenser comprising a base, a vertical guide mounted on said base for receiving a vertical stack of coins, a stop element lfixed with relation to said guide adjacent the bottom thereof and having an upwardly facing surface spaced from the bottom of said guide by a distance equal to the thickness of one of said coins, a generally horizontal push rod having two opposite ends and a central portion between said opposite ends, a push rod guide fixedly mounted on said base in spaced relation to said vertical guide, said push rod guide having mutually facing horizontally spaced surfaces between which said central portion of said rod is received, spring means acting downwardly on one end of said rod to resiliently hold the other end of the push rod upwardly toward said stack, and means connected to said rod for the reciprocation thereof to cause said other end to rake the lower end of said tube.

4. A coin dispenser comprising a base, a vertical tube mounted on said base for receiving a vertical stack of coins, a stop element fixed with relation to said tube adjacent the bottom thereof and having an upwardly facing surface spaced from the bottom of said tube by a distance equal to the thickness of one of said coins, a generally horizontal push rod having two opposite ends and a central portion between said opposite ends, a push rod guide fixedly mounted on said base in spaced relation to said vertical guide, said push rod guide having mutually facing horizontally spaced surfaces between which said central portion of said rod is received, spring means acting downwardly on one end of said rod to resiliently hold the other end of said rod upwardly toward said stack, a solenoid fixed to said base and having a horizontally reciprocal armature, a vertically extending member fixed to said armature and extending through said horizontal push rod, said solenoid being adapted when energized to project said push rod toward the lowermost coin, and a spring secured to said armature and base and yieldably maintaining said push rod retracted.

5. A coin dispenser comprising a base, a vertical tube mounted on said base for receiving a vertical stack of coins, a stop element fixed with relation to said tube adjacent the bottom thereof and having an upwardly facing surface spaced from the bottom of said tube by a distance equal to the thickness of one of said coins, a generally horizontal push rod having two opposite ends and a central portion between said opposite ends, a guide mounted on said base in spaced relation to said tube, said guide having horizontal mutually facing surfaces between which said central portion of said rod is received, a tension spring connecting one end of said rod to said base, said spring extending downwardly from said one end to said base and acting to resiliently hold the other end of the push rod upwardly with said guide means as a fulcrum, said other end being upwardly curved, a solenoid fixed to said base and having a horizontally reciprocal armature, a vertically extending member fixed to said armature and extending through said horizontal push rod, said solenoid being adapted when energized to project said push rod toward the lowermost coin, and a spring secured to said armature and base and yieldably maintaining said push rod retracted.

-6. A coin dispenser comprising a base, a vertical tube mounted on said base for receiving a vertical stack of coins, a tube mounting block cfixedly received on the lower end of said tube and having a lower surface flush with the bottom of said tube, a stop element fixed with relation to said tube adjacent the bottom thereof and having an upwardly facing surface spaced from the bottom of said tube by a distance equal to the thickness of one of said coins, a generally horizontal push rod having two opposite ends and a central portion between said opposite ends, a guide mounted on said base in spaced relation to said tube, said guide having horizontal mutually facing surfaces between which said central portion of said rod is received, a tension spring connecting one end of said rod to said base, said spring extending downwardly from said one end to said base and acting to resiliently hold the other end of the push rod upwardly against said tube mounting block with said guide means as a fulcrum, said other end being upwardly curved, a solenoid fixed to said base and having a horizontally reciprocal armature, a vertically extending member fixed to said armature and extending through said horizontal push rod, said solenoid being adapted when energized to project said push rod toward the lowermost coin, and a spring secured to said armature and base and yieldably maintaining said push rod retracted.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,773,348 Dauer Aug. 19, 1930 2,552,856 Knapp May 15, 1951 2,782,791 Sigo Feb. 26, 1957 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,089,736 France Oct. '6, 1954

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1773348 *Dec 1, 1924Aug 19, 1930Hedman Mfg CompanyChange-making machine
US2552856 *Dec 17, 1947May 15, 1951Earl Hovey CMachine for automatically preparing and vending liquid foods
US2782791 *Sep 15, 1952Feb 26, 1957Serv Kraft IncCoin dispensing mechanism
FR1089736A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3359993 *Mar 4, 1966Dec 26, 1967Standard Change Makers IncChangemaker
US5830055 *Nov 7, 1996Nov 3, 1998Telequip CorporationCoin/token canister and ejection mechanism
US6540601Feb 9, 2001Apr 1, 2003Mag-Nif IncorporatedCash box with coin sorter
US6554692Feb 9, 2001Apr 29, 2003Mag-Nif IncorporatedCoin sorting and amusement device
US6585581Feb 9, 2001Jul 1, 2003Mag-Nif IncorporatedCoin sorting apparatus with reciprocating coin pushing member
DE2848419A1 *Nov 8, 1978May 14, 1980Laurel Bank Machine CoVorrichtung zum ausgeben von muenzen
Classifications
U.S. Classification453/21, 453/41
International ClassificationG07D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationG07D1/00
European ClassificationG07D1/00