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Publication numberUS3125343 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 17, 1964
Filing dateAug 25, 1961
Publication numberUS 3125343 A, US 3125343A, US-A-3125343, US3125343 A, US3125343A
InventorsStanley J. Price
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Improper gxlf swing is executed
US 3125343 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

M r 1964 5. J. PRICE, JR.. ETAL 3,

BARRICADE MEANS TO BE STRUCK BY A GOLF CLUB WHEN AN IMPROPER sour swmc IS zxzcumo Filed Aug. 25, 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet l l IN VEN TORS STANLEY J. PR|cE,JR. GEORGE RAYNov|cH,JR.

March 17, 1964 5. J. PRICE, JR. ETAL 3,125,343

BARRICADE MEANS To B E-STRUCK BY A GOLF CLUB WHEN AN IMPROPER GOLF SWING IS EXECUTED 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Aug. 25, 1961 INVENTORS STAN LEYJ.PRICE.,JR.

44 '6EoRsEPAYNov|cH,JR.

United States Patent BARRICADE MEANS TO BE STRUCK BY A GOLF CLUB WHEN AN IMPROPER GOLF SWING IS EXECUTED Stanley J. Price, Jr., 6516 Springvale Drive, and George Raynovich, Jr., 5344 Meadowcrest Road, both of Pittsburgh 36, Pa.

Filed Aug. 25, 1961, Ser. No. 133,891 2 Claims. (Cl. 273-186) This invention relates to a method and device for training a golfer, and more particularly to a method and device which effectively indicate to a golfer whether the golf club has followed the desired path of travel during the golf swing.

In its broadest aspects, the present invention is directed to correcting a golfers swing by trial and error. To accomplish the correction, a barricade is temporarily erected adjacent the desired path of travel of the golf club so that the club will not strike the barricade when following the desired path, but so that the club will strike the barricade if the club travels along a path which produces the fault in the swing desired to be corrected. With the barricade so erected, the golfer swings at the ball. Each time the club strikes the barricade, the golfer definitely knows that his swing has been improper. If the golfer executes a proper swing, the club does not contact the barricade and the golfers efforts are rewarded by his striking the ball in the proper manner.

In order to prevent damage to the golf club, the barricade is formed of a resilient material such as rubber or plastic so that when struck by the club, the barricade does not cause marring or bending of the club. The barricade may also be constructed so that it is movable and will be propelled by the club if struck. In this situation, a poor swing requires the golfer to retrieve the barricade before utilizing it to execute the next swing. Thus, a poor swing is penalized while a proper swing exacts no penalty.

In the detailed description to follow, the method and device of the present invention will be described in detail as applied. to correcting a golf swing which produces a slice. Since a slice is one of the most common type of faults experienced by golfers, this example is appropriate. However, it should be understood that the principles of the present invention are equally applicable to correcting other golf swing faults such as a swing which produces a hook, or a swing which causes the ball to be undercut and so be propelled with excessive height, or a swing which causes the ball to be topped. Accordingly, the scope of the present invention should not be limited by the detailed description to follow, but should be determined by the claims appended hereto.

With the foregoing considerations in mind, it is a primary object of the present invention to provide an improved method of training a golfers swing by trial and error.

Another object of this invention is to provide a novel device for training a golfers swing.

Another object of this invention is to provide a barricade for training a golfers swing which may be positioned adjacent the desired path of club travel so that a proper swing will cause the club to avoid the barricade but so that an improper swing will cause the club to strike the barricade.

Another object of this invention is to provide a banicade for correcting a golf swing which may be struck by the golf club without causing damage to the. golf club.

These and other objects of this invention will become apparent as this description proceeds in conjunction with the attached drawings in which the same element is indicated by like reference numerals in all figures.

3,125,343 Patented Mar. 17, 1964 In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a diagrammatic illustration of certain golf swing characteristics.

FIGURE 2 is a top plan view of one embodiment of the device of the present invention.

FIGURE 3 is a perspective view of the embodiment of FIGURE 2 shown positioned relative to a golf ball and the desired line of flight of the ball.

FIGURES 4 through 7 are diagrammatic illustrations of the device of FIGURE 2 shown in its various positions relative to the desired line of flight of the ball.

FIGURE 8 is a top plan view of a second embodiment of the device of the present invention.

FIGURE 9 is a perspective view, similar to FIGURE 3, of the embodiment of FIGURE 8.

Referring to FIGURE 1, a golf ball 10 is shown in position to be driven by a golfer. The position of the golfers feet is indicated at 12. The desired line of flight of the ball 10 has been extended back through the ball and is indicated at A. As is the case with most positions of address to a golf ball, the golfers toes are on a line 14 extending parallel to the desired direction of flight. A golf club 16 is shown approaching the ball along a path of travel 18. A second possible path of travel 20 for club 16 is also illustrated in FIGURE 1.

The path of travel 18 for club 16 progresses from inside, or from the golfers side, of the desired line of flight A to the ball 10 and then substantially parallels the desired line of flight A as the ball is contacted. This type of swing 18 is known as an inside-out swing since it progresses from inside the desired line of flight A outwardly toward the desired line of flight A. The insideon swing is likely to produce a good drive of the golf ball and the progress of the path of travel from the inside outwardly is a basic characteristic of a proper golf swing. Although other factors enter into the quality of the swing, the inside-on characteristic is a basic characteristic that must be taught in order to correct the faulty swing of a golfer who slices a golf ball.

The path of travel 20 for club 16 progresses from outside, or away from the golfers side, of the desired line of flight A inwardly toward line of flight A and crosses the desired line of flight A as the ball 10 is contacted. This type of swing 20 is known as an outside-in swing. The outside-in swing 20 is most likely to produce a slice since, as the ball is contacted, the club 16 is moving inwardly toward the golfer so that, in addition to driving the ball, the club imparts a clockwise spin to the ball 10, as viewed in FIGURE 1. As the ball 10 loses its forward velocity, the clockwise spin causes the ball to deviate from a true flight path. The deviation due to a clockwise spin causes the flight of the ball to curve to the right of, or above as viewed in FIGURE 1, the desired line of flight A. This deviation is termed a slice.

The present invention provides a barricade which prevents a golfer from executing an outside-in swing 20 and which teaches the golfer to execute an inside-out swing 18.

Thus far the swing of a right-handed golfer has been described, and the device of the present invention will be described as applied to a right-handed golfer. It will be appreciated that the invention is equally applicable to left-handed golfers and the device may be constructed as a mirror image to accommodate left-handed golfers.

Referring to FIGURES 2 and 3, the device 22 has an upright barricade 24 which is maintained in the upright position by a base 26. Base 26 is perpendicular to barricade 24 and is preferably formed integrally therewith. The base 26 may have a recess 28 to save material from which the device 22 is formed. The recess 28 may be omitted since it has no function other than economy of manufacture, although in some instances the recess 28 may be so formed that the edges of the recess are aligned in a manner that they may substitute for the indicator means hereinafter described.

Formed on the base 26 is an arrow 30 which is labeled Ball. Another arrow 31 labeled Ball bears the marking 1 and is' formed on base 26. Arrows 32 and 33, hearing the markings 2 and 3 respectively are formed adjacent arrow 31. The arrows 30, 31, 32 and 33 form locator means for the device 22 in a manner to be described. These arrows 30, 31, 32 and 33 may be molded on base 26 or they may be printed or otherwise formed thereon.

In use, arrows 30 and 31, which are labeled Ball function to locate the device 22 relative to the ball 10 and may, therefore, be termed ball indicators. The arrows 31, 32 and 33 function to locate the device 22 relative to the desired direction of flight A and may, for that reason, be termed flight indicators. The barricade 24, itself, is also utilized in one instance to locate the device 22 relative to the desired direction of flight A. Under this circumstance barricade 24 may also be termed a flight indicator. It will be noted that arrow 31, marked 1, is utilized as both a ball indicator and a flight indicator. The positions that the device 22 may assume will be referred to by the designation of the flight indicator utilized to obtain that position as is hereinafter explained.

As seen in FIGURE 3, the device 22 is positioned in one of its positions relative to the golf ball 10 and the desired line of flight of the ball A. Referring to FIG- URES 4 through 7, various positions of the device 22 and the manner of positioning it relative to the ball 10 and the desired line of flight A may be considered.

FIGURE 4 shows the device 22 in what will be termed the Number One Position since the position is achieved by the use of arrow 39 and arrow 31 which is marked 1. To place the device 22 in the Number One Position," the arrows 30 and 31, each of which are labeled Ball, are utilized to position the device 22 relative to the ball 10. Mentally, the arrows 30 and 31 are imagined to be extended and the ball is placed at the intersection of the imaginary lines of extension 30a and 31a. Since the actual distance between the device 22 and ball 10 is not great, there is no difliculty in mentally imagining the arrows to be extended to locate the ball position. Simultaneously, the arrow 31 is aligned with the desired line of flight A of the ball 10. In practice, the actual manner of positioning the device 22 may be accomplished by either one of two procedures.

One procedure by which positioning may be accomplished is to first place the device 22 on the ground with the desired flight indicator 31, 32 or 33 or barricade 24 parallel to the desired direction of flight A. The ball indicators 30 and 31 are then mentally extended to a point of intersection and the ball 10 is placed at the point of intersection of the arrows 30 and 31, extended.

A second procedure by which positioning may be accomplished is to first place the ball 10 on the ground and then move the device 22 by trial and error until the ball indicators 30 and 31, extended, intersect the ball 10 and the desired flight indicator is parallel to the desired direction of flight A.

No matter which of the procedures is utilized, the positions of the device 22 may be defined by reference to the flight indicator which is then aligned with the desired direction of flight. Thus, the Number One Position shown in FIGURE 4 has arrow 31, marked 1, aligned with the desired direction of flight and has the ball 10 located relative to the Ball Arrows 30 and 31.

FIGURE shows the device 22 in the Number Two Position since the flight arrow 32, marked 2 is parallel to the desired direction of flight A. To illustrate this relationship, an imaginary line 32a has been extended and is shown parallel to line A. The ball is located by arrows 30 and 31.

FIGURE 6 shows the device 22 in the Number Three Position since the flight arrow 33, marked 3 is parallel to the desired direction of flight A as illustrated by the extension of line 33a.

FIGURE 7 shows the device 22 in the Number Four Position since the barricade 24 itself is parallel to the desired direction of flight A. In this situation the barricade 24 serves as a flight indicator while the ball is located by ball arrows 3i) and 31. An imaginary line 24a is extended from barricade 24 to further illustrate the parallel relationship between the barricade 24 and the desired line of flight A in the Number Four Position.

The four positions of device 22 shown in FIGURES 4 through 7 are provided as examples of the various ways in which device 22 may be positioned to help correct a golfers swing. These positions are exemplary only, and different positions or a greater number of positions for the device 22 may be provided by appropriate positioning of the indicator arrows.

As an example of how the various positions of device 22 may be utilized, the Number One Position (FIG- URE 4) is suggested to show that an inside-out type of swing is desired. The Number One Position is an exaggerated position in that it is unlikely that a good drive can result with the barricade so positioned. Most likely, with the device 22 in the Number One Position the ball will be pushed to the right of the desired line of flight. This pushed drive will not be a slice, however, since the ball will not assume a curved flight path, but rather will follow a straight flight path that is angularly displaced to the right of the desired line of flight A.

Once the golfer has hit a number of drives with the device in the Number One Position, the device can then be moved to the Number Two Position, shown in FIG- URE 5. Here the inside-out characteristic of the swing is not so exaggerated. However, it will still be rather difficult to hit a ball along the desired line of flight A, the tendency being to still push the ball slightly to the right.

In the Number Three Position (FIGURE 6) the golfer should easily be able to swing inside-out and hit the ball along the desired line of flight A. Although the end of barricade 24 does not cross line A as in FIGURES 4 and 5, the golfer must still swing inside-out since the club head must clear the barricade and in order to do so it must be well inside the line A.

After the golfer has progressed to the Number Three Position (FIGURE 6) he may still have a tendency to push the ball to the right of the line of flight A. If this occurs, it will probably be for the reason that the golfer is not rolling his wrists sufficiently as the club head meets the ball. As is recognized in the sport of golfing, it is desirable for the golfers wrists to roll or snap as the club contacts the ball. If the wrists roll properly, the ball will not be pushed to the right when the device 22 is positioned in the Number Three Position (FIGURE 6) and the ball is driven. Rather, the swing will parallel the desired line of flight A as the club head contacts the ball as is shown by the path of travel 18 of the club 16 in FIGURE 1.

To correct for an improper roll of the wrists, the Number Four Position (FIGURE 7) is provided. In this position of device 22, the barricade 24 parallels the desired line of flight. When in this position, the golfers swing must still be at least slightly inside-out to clear the barricade 24. At the same time, if the golfer fails to roll his wrists, the club head will be pushed out from the golfer and will contact the side of barricade 24. If this occurs, the deficiency of the swing will be vividly demonstrated to the golfer and he will know that correction is required.

It will be seen that the device 22 is extremely versatile and may be positioned in various ways to accommodate golfers of varying degrees of proficiency. The device 22 is preferably formed of rubber or plastic which is resilient so that the device 22 does not cause damage to the golf club when struck, and so that the device itself resists impact. A device 22 formed of polyethylene has been successfully utilized.

In order to further strengthen the device 22 against impact, the rear edge of the barricade 24 may have a bead 36 formed thereon. Since the rear edge of the barricade 24 is most likely to be struck during the course of an improper swing, the bead 36 adds a greater mass of material at this point to resist the impact.

FIGURES 8 and 9 show a second embodiment of the present invention. This embodiment is more sophisticated than the embodiment of FIGURES 2-7 in that it combines training features of more than one position of the embodiment of FIGURES? 2-7.

As seen in FIGURES 8 and 9, a device 40* has a barricade 42 formed thereon. Barricade 42 has a relatively planar front end portion 42a and a relatively planar rear end potrion 42b connected by a smoothly curving intermediate portion 42c. The barricade is maintained in an upright position by a base 44. The rear end of the barricade 42 has a bead 46 formed thereon to strengthen the barricade against impact at that point.

Formed on the base '44 are ball arrows 48 and 50 which serve as ball indicators to locate the device 40 relative to a golf ball in the manner previously described in connection with the device 22. The ball 10 is placed at the intersection of imaginary lines 48a and 5% which are line of sight extensions of ball arrows 48 and 50. A flight arrow 52 is also formed on base 44 to position device 40 relative to the desired line of flight A of ball 10. Only one arrow is provided since device 40- has only one position, although additional positions and corresponding additional flight indicators may be provided if desired.

Just as device 22, device 40 is preferably formed of rubber or resilient plastic to protect the golf club and to be impact resistant.

As best seen in FIGURE 8, the device 40 is preferably positioned so that the barricade front end portion 42a extends parallel to the desired direction of flight A. The barricade rear end portion 42b extends toward the desired line of flight A. It will be seen that the device 40 requires a golfer to swing with an inside-out characteristic to allow the club to pass clear of the barricade rear end portion 42b. At the same time, the position of the barricade front end portion 42a requires that the golfer properly roll his wrists to bring the golf club along the desired line of flight A so that the golf club does not strike the barricade front end portion 42a.

Because it will be more difficult for a golfer having a low degree of proficiency to successfully drive a ball, utilizing device 40, device 40 may be considered an advanced training device when compared with device 22. Device 40 simultaneously combines the training features of the Number Two Position (FIGURE 5) and the Number Four Position (FIGURE 7) of the device 22. It will be appreciated that other advance training devices can be formed utilizing other combinations of the training features of the positions of device 22.

In addition, devices similar to those described herein may be constructed to correct other golf swing faults by utilizing the principles of the present invention. Thus, just as a slice results from a severe outside-in swing, a hook will result from a severe inside-out swing. Accordingly a barricade may be positioned inside the desired line of flight to train a booking golfer to alter his swing to have a more outside in characteristic by forcing the golfer to avoid a barricade positioned in the path of an inside-out swing. Further, golfers who undercut or top the ball may be benefitted by the principles of the present invention by positioning barricades on the desired line of flight but above or below a desired path of club head travel to force the golfer to 6 modify his swing if he desires to strike the ball without striking the barricade.

It should be appreciated that in using all of the devices herein described, the golfers basic stance shown in FIG- URE 1 remains substantially unchanged. The barricades erected by the devices of the present invention are intended to modify the swing from a proper stance, not to cause the golfer to assume other positions in order to avoid the barricades.

According to the provisions of the patent statutes, We have explained the principle, preferred construction and mode of operation of our invention and have illustrated and described what we now consider to represent its best embodiments. However, we desire to have it understood that, within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically illustrated and described.

We claim:

1. A device for training a golfers swing comprising:

(a) a base member,

(b) a barricade member projecting upwardly therefrom,

(c) first indicating means on said base member, said first indicating means adapted to be aligned parallel to a desired line of flight,

(d) other indicating means on said base member, said other indicating means being arranged on said base member in such a manner that when said first indicating means is positioned parallel to said desired line of flight, an imaginary' extension of said other indicating means will designate a point not located on said base member or said barricade member and said point will define a desired point of placement for a golf ball,

(2) said barricade member being positioned on said base member in such a manner that at least a portion thereof is positioned in close proximity to an imaginary straight line passing through said desired point of placement of golf ball and parallel to said first indicating means on said base mmeber,

the position of the barricade member relative to said point of placement for a golf ball further being such that said portion thereof lies adjacent the approach portion of the swing and spaced from the path of the swing so as to be struck by an improperly swung club.

2. A device for training a golfers swing comprising:

(a) a base member,

(b) a barricade member projecting upwardly from an edge thereof,

(c) a first arrow on said base member, said first arrow adapted to be aligned parallel to a desired line of flight,

(d) a second and a third arrow on said base member, said second and third arrows being arranged on said base member in such a manner that when said first arrow is positioned parallel to said desired line of flight, imaginary extensions of said second and third arrows will cross at a point not located on said base member or said barricade member and said point will define a desired point of placement for a golf ball,

(e) said barricade member being positioned on said base member in such a manner that at least a portion thereof is positioned in close proximity to an imaginary straight line passing through said desired point of placement of a golf 'ball and parallel to said first arrow on said base member,

(f) the position of the barricade member relative to said point of placement for a golf ball further being such that said portion thereof lies adjacent the approach portion of the swing and spaced from the path of the swing so as to be struck by an improperlv swung club.

(References on following page.)

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Sullivan July 5, 1921 Edgar Mar. 14, 1922 Lynch Aug. 17, 1926 Glennon et a l. Aug. 2, 1927 Elder Feb. 7, 1928 Morris June 3, 1930 8 Harpster Mar. 28, 1939 Molinar Sept. 15, 1953 Rolfe Apr. 30, 1957 FOREIGN PATENTS Great Britain 1889 Great Britain Oct. 25, 1928 Great Britain Apr. 14, 1937

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1383876 *Jan 12, 1920Jul 5, 1921Sullivan Paul CGolf-practicing means
US1409688 *May 19, 1920Mar 14, 1922Douglas Edgar JamesDevice for instruction in golf strokes
US1596110 *Aug 18, 1925Aug 17, 1926Lynch Joseph HGolf tee
US1637339 *Apr 9, 1927Aug 2, 1927Glennon Michael JMeans for instructing golf strokes
US1658482 *Mar 19, 1927Feb 7, 1928Elder Harry HTee for golf balls
US1761532 *Jan 16, 1929Jun 3, 1930Staddon Morris WalterGolf tee
US2152381 *Jul 29, 1938Mar 28, 1939James M GuthrieStroke perfecting device for golfers
US2652251 *Jan 4, 1952Sep 15, 1953Alfonso MolinarGolf indicator apparatus
US2790642 *Apr 6, 1954Apr 30, 1957Rolfe Andrew TPutting guide device
GB299244A * Title not available
GB464220A * Title not available
GB188912941A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3231271 *Jun 28, 1963Jan 25, 1966Murphy William EApparatus for practicing strokes with a tennis racket
US5024442 *Jun 19, 1990Jun 18, 1991Sindelar Sr Joseph LPutting practice device
US5072943 *Dec 7, 1990Dec 17, 1991Sindelar Joseph LGolf club in combination with a putter stabilizer
US5125665 *Jan 3, 1991Jun 30, 1992Sindelar Sr Joseph LGolf putter and stabilizer
US5346220 *Sep 28, 1993Sep 13, 1994Cooper Patrice AGolf club swing practice device
US5350177 *Mar 3, 1993Sep 27, 1994Furbush Jr Norman CGolf club swing training apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/265, 434/252
International ClassificationA63B69/36
Cooperative ClassificationA63B69/3623
European ClassificationA63B69/36D