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Publication numberUS3126023 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 24, 1964
Filing dateMar 17, 1961
Publication numberUS 3126023 A, US 3126023A, US-A-3126023, US3126023 A, US3126023A
InventorsCharles S. Nagy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic change dispensing accounting machines
US 3126023 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 24, 1964 c. s NAGY 3,125,023

AUTOMATIC CHANGE DISPENSING ACCOUNTING MACHINES Q Filed March 17, 1961 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG. 2

INVENTOR CHARLES S. NAGY HIS ATTORNEYS March 24, 1964 c. s. NAGY ,0

AUTOMATIC CHANGE DISPENSING ACCOUNTING MACHINES Filed March 17. 1961 5 Sheets-Sheet s INVENTOR CHARLES S. NAGY 8 0 5x 1 W/ j HIS ATTORNEYS March-24, 1964 c. s. NAGY 3,126,023

AUTOMATIC CHANGE DISPENSING ACCOUNTING MACHINES Filed Ma'rch 1'7. 1961 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVE N TOR CHARLES S. NAGY i:ll$ ATTORNEYS March 24, 1964 c. s. NAGY I 3,

AUTOMATIC CHANGE DISPENSING ACCOUNTING MACHINES Filed March 1'7, 1961 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 ms ATTORNEYS INVENTOR CHARLES S. NAGY United States Patent C) This invention relates to improvements in automatic controls, setup by an accounting machine, for controlling the operation of a change-dispensing device, as part of the operation of the accounting machine.

The invention as disclosed applies to machines of the type shown in United States Patent No. 2,616,623, issued to Mar 6A; Go'odba'r'et al. n November 4, 1952, and United States Patent No. 2,954,037, issued to Paul H. Williams et al. on September 27, 1960.

The general object of this invention is to provide auto matic controls, set up by operation of an accounting machine of the type disclosed in said Goodbar et al. patent, for operating a change dispenser of the type disclosed in the Williams et al. patent, whereby coins are automatically delivered upon certain operations of the Goodbar et al. type of machine.

Another object of this invention is to provide a mechanism which delays the operation of an associated change dispenser until a subsequent operation of an accounting machine has occurred.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a switch-closing mechanism which conditions a switch for operation upon the operation of an accounting machine and which closes the switch to energize a change dispenser for the dispensing of change upon a subsequent operation of the accounting machine.

With these and incidental objects in view, the invention consists of certain novel features of construction and combinations of'parts, a preferred form or embodiment of which is hereinafter described with reference to the drawings which accompany and form a part of this specification.

Of said drawings:

FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic view of a keyboard.

FIG. 2 is a right side view of the first transaction bank, showing the transaction differential mechanism and certain mechanisms adjusted thereby.

FIG. 3 is a detailed view of the switch-controlling mechanism for operating the coin dispenser together with a control disc set under control of the first transaction bank.

FIG. 4 is a detailed view of the switch-actuating arm and shows the disabling arm in a blocking position and in a non-blocking position.

FIG. 5 is a top view of FIG. 3, showing the notched control discs together with the feeling fingers coacting therewith. I

FIG; 6 is an end sectional view, taken on the line 6-6 of FIG. 3, showing the switch-controlling mechanism.

FIG. 7 is a detailed view ofia notched control disc set under the control of the keys of the second transaction bank for controlling the operation of the switch=controlling mechanism together with the feeling fingers coacting therewith.

FIG. 8 is a detailed view of a notched control disc set under control of the first transaction bank of keys for controlling the operation of the switch-controlling mechanism together with the feeling finger coacting therewith.

FIG. 9 is a detailed view of a notched control disc set under control of the second transaction bank for controlling the operation of the switch-controlling mechanism together with the feeling finger coacting therewith.

ice

FIG. 10 is a detailed view of a notched control disc set under control of the first transaction bank for controlling the operation of the switch-controlling mechanism together with the feeling finger coacting therewith.

FIG. 11 is another detailed view of a notched control disc set under control of the second transaction bank for controlling the operation of the switch-controlling mechanism shown together with the feeling finger coacting therewith.

FIG. 12 is a view of a notched control disc set under control of the first transaction bank for controliing the operation of the switch-controlling mechanism together with the feeling finger coacting therewith.

FIG. 13 is a schematic diagram showing the electrical control system connected between the accounting machine and the coin dispenser.

FIG. 14 is a partial detailed view of the mechanism for the setting of the electrical switch according to the change to be given.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION The invention is shown embodied in a machine for use by commercial bank tellers. In the handling of commercial account transactions, it is necessary to segregate deposits, in the form of cash, checks, and mixed checks and cash, from cash-paid-out transactions. In the recording of these commercial bank transactions, it is also necessary to enter transactions wherein a check is presented, a part of the amount of which is deposited and the balance taken in cash by the customer.

All of the above transactions are recorded on the present machine at the tellers window simultaneously to produce printed records for use by the auditing and bookkeeping departments. Recording mechanisms are located at the front of the machine and include a slip printer, to print on deposit slips and cash tickets; an audit tape printer; and an issuing tape printer.

The machine illustrated herein is provided with three totalizer lines. Included is an adding and subtracting totalizer of the type disclosed in the United States Patent No. 2,774,298, issued to Everett H. Placke et al. on December 18, 1956. This totalizer is mounted on the upper, or visible, totalizer line. The front totalizer line has eight interspersed totalizers for classifying various entries. The rear totalizer line has one totalizer, for accumulating the amounts of batches of checks. Use of the add-subtract totalizer together with the change dispenser of the type disclosed in the previously mentioned Williams et al. United States Patent No. 2,954,037, provides for the automatic dispensing of change as a by-product of the above-mentioned commercial bank transactions where the balance is taken in cash by the customer. When two or more checks are presented to be cashed, the machine'a ccumulates the total and actuates the change dispensers to issue change on the total of all the amounts.

The invention is drawn to a novel switch-closing mechanism, located in the accounting machine, which when actuated closes a switch which completes an energizing circuit to the change dispenser, resulting in the operation of the dispenser to dispense the amount set up in the add-subtract totalizer. As disclosed hereinafter, the switch-closing mechanism may be actuated 011 one operation of the accounting machine or may be conditioned to operate on one operation and then operated on a succeeding operation of the accounting machine.

Each operation of the accounting machine is initiated by the depression of certain transaction keys in the two transactionbanks. As will be disclosed hereinafter, certain transaction keys are motorized and initiate an operation of the accounting machine by themselves, while others must be used in conjunction with the motorized keys. Depression of these keys also controls the operation of the switch-closing mechanism. The following examples illustrate the type of keys which are used in controlling the switch-closing mechanism. The mechanism is actuated when the Cashed Checks key or the Cash Out key is depressed by itself. When the List key is used in combination with the Cashed Checks key, the mechanism does not actuate the change dispenser, but change is dispensed when the Cash Out key is used in combination with the List key. Both the Cashed Checks key and the Amount Tendered key, when used with the List key, condition the mechanism to operate upon a subsequent operation of the accounting machine initiated by the use of the Total key.

The controls effected by each key in the first and second transaction banks are briefly tabulated below.

Deposit Key Depression of the Deposit key, followed by an operation of the machine, causes a double impression to be made on the slip and a single impression to be made on the audit tape, and controls the totalizers so as to add into a classification totalizer allotted to the depressed key on the front totalizer line. hen the Deposit key is used with the List key, the amount set up on the keyboard is added to the add side of the add-subtract totalizer.

"Deposit N Perf Key This key is the same as the Deposit key but is used where there is a special form of deposit. Depression of this key validates a special receipt form which does not lend itself to normal deposit validation with the automatic receipt perforation.

Miscellaneous Key Operation of the machine with the Miscellaneous key depressed causes one impression to be made upon the deposit slip and one impression to be made on the audit tape. When the Miscellaneous key is used with the List key only, the amount set up on the keyboard is entered into the subtract side of the add-subtract totalizer.

Cash Out Key Depression of the Cash Out key, followed by an operation of the machine, causes an impression to be made on the issuing tape and causes the tape to be fed one step. The Cash Out key also controls the printing so that an impression is made on the audit tape and causes the amount set up on the keyboard to be entered into a totalizer allotted thereto on the front totalizer line. Depression of this key also controls the switch-closing mechanism, and change is dispensed when this key is depressed by itself or with the depression of the List key, as previously disclosed. The Cash key also adds into the add side of the add-subtract totalizer.

"Cash In Key Depression of the Cash In key causes one impression to be made upon the deposit slip and one impression to be made on the audit tape. The amount is entered into a totalizer allotted thereto on the front totalizer line. Depression of the Cash in key in combination with the List key, followed by an operation of the machine, causes the amount set up on the keyboard to be subtracted from the add-subtract totalizer.

Amount Tendered Key Depression of the Amount Tendered key, followed by an operation of the machine, causes the amount set up on the keyboard to be printed on the audit tape and on the issuing tape. When the Amount Tendered key is used with the List key, depression of the Amount Tendered key conditions the switch-closing mechanism to energize the coin dispenser when the Total key is depressed on a subsequent operation. Use of the Amount Tendered key adds the amount into the add side of the add-subtract totalizer.

"Cash Checks Key Depression of the Cash Checks key, followed by an operation of the machine, makes a single impression on the slip, and the data is printed on the audit tape. The amount set up on the keyboard is entered into a totalizer allotted to this key on the front totalizer line, and this amount is also added into a batch totalizer on the rear totalizer line. Depression of the Cash Checks key in combination with the List key, followed by an operation of the machine, causes the amount set up on the keyboard to be added to the add-subtract totalizer. Use of the Cash Checks key by itself causes change to be dispensed. When the Cash Checks key is used with the List key, depression of the Cash Checks key conditions the switch-closing mechanism so as to energize the change dispenser upon the subsequent operation of the accounting machine, which operation is initiated by the use of the Total key. When the Cash Checks key is used with the List key, depression of the Cash Checks key does not cause change to be dispensed.

"Resef Key The Reset key controls the machine to reset any selected totalizer on the front totalizer line. The total is printed on the audit tape and on the issuing tape.

Read" Key Operation of the machine with the Read key depressed results in the identical operation described with the Reset key depressed, except that a sub-total is printed, and the selected totalizer is not cleared.

Batch Reset Key The'Batch Reset key controls the accounting machine to clear the batch totalizer on the rear totalizer line corresponding to the key depressed. It controls the printing mechanisms of the machine so that the amount cleared from the totalizer is printed on the audit tape and on the issuing tape.

Repeat Key The Repeat key is always used with a motorized key, and the controls effected depend on the controls of the key with which it is depressed. Use of the Repeat key results in the repetition of the amount of the last operation.

Minus Key The Minus key controls the machine so that the amounts set up on the keyboard are entered into the subtract side of the add-subtract totalizer. The totalizerengaging mechanisms for the front and back totalizers are disabled; all printing is disabled during the operation in which the Minus key only is depressed. Thus, when the machine is operated with only the Minus key depressed, the machine operates as a straight adding machine.

Plus Key The Plus key is similar to the Minus key except that operation of the machine adds the amounts set up on the keyboard into the add side of the add-subtract totalizer. All other operations are the same as those found in the Minus key description.

keys in the second transaction bank for controlling the operation of the change dispenser, as explained previously.

Credit Total Key Depression of the Total key, followed by an operation of the machine, causes the add-subtract totalizer to be cleared when a positive total is standing on the totalizer. The total cleared from the add-subtract totalizer is then printed on the audit tape. The operation of both the Credit Total key, above, and the Total key is dependent upon the total standing on the add-subtract totalizer. When the total standing on the add-subtract totalizer is a positive total, only the Total key is capable of being depressed, while the Credit Total key is locked out. The opposite condition is present when a minus total is present on the add-subtract totalizer. For a more complete description of the operation of the add-subtract totalizer and the printing mechanisms controlled by the above keys, reference should be made to the United States patents to Everett H. Placke et al., No. 2,774,298, and Mayo A. Goodbar et al., No. 2,616,623, respectively, cited previously.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Keyboard As shown in FIG. 1, the keyboard of the machine, as illustrated herein, is provided with eight rows of amount keys 120 and two rows of transaction keysrow 1, or tthe first transaction row of keys 121 to 129, and row 2, or the second transaction row of keys 130 to 137. The transaction keys are provided with legends to aid in their selection and for controlling the machine in its operation. The keys 123, 126, 127, 128, 129, and 137 do not release the machine for operation but must be used in combination with other keys. At the top of the keyboard is shown the visible, or add-subtract, totalizer 119. Near the right-hand corner of the keyboard is a Release key 138, which is used for the release of keys on the keyboard if for any reason it is desired to release them after they have been depressed and before the machine has been released for operation. The Reset key 128 is provided with a lock 139, by means of which the teller may lock the Reset key during his absence. A similar lock 140 is provided for the Read key 129.

The Add-Print key 137 is a stay-down key and may be released by manipulation of a lever 141, located to the left of the key 137.

A control slide lock 142 (FIG. 1), located on the lefthand side of the keyboard, is provided for locking the machine, controlling the resetting of the consecutive number means, changing the date, and various other operations not described herein. For a more detailed explanation of the operation of the control slide lock 142, reference may be had to the previously-cited United States patent to Mayo A. Goodbar et al., No. 2,616,623. Datesetting dials 143 are also provided and may be adjusted by the knurled knobs 144 and 145 to set type characters at the printing line in the same manner as shown in the above-cited United States Patent No. 2,616,623.

Transaction Bank Differential Mechanism In the normal operation of the machine, the amount of the transaction has been entered into the amount banks by depression of the proper amount keys 120 on the keyboard, and a transaction key has been operated in conjunction with the transaction. The keys 121 to 129 inclusive of row 1, also known herein as the first transaction bank, and the keys 130 to 137 inclusive of row 2, also known herein as the second transaction bank,

control the operation of a differential mechanism associated with each bank of keys. The differential mechanisms are differentially adjusted for controlling the machine operations, for controlling the engagement and the disengagement of the proper totalizers and the amount actuators for both adding and subtracting operations, and for controlling total-taking operations. Since the above operations concerning the amount banks have no bearing on this invention, no detailed explanation of this construction will be given. The differential mechanisms of both transaction banks are also dilferentially adjusted for controlling the switch-closing mechanism Which'controls the operation of the change dispenser. The differential mechanisms for each of the two rows of transaction keys are identical; therefore only one is described herein, and, for convenience, row 1 has been selected for this description.

Each transaction key is provided at its lower end with a square stud 146 (FIG. 2). Coacting with the stud 146 is a dilferentially-settable slide 147. The studs 146 of the transaction keys 121 to 129 inclusive project alternately to the right and to the left into the path of alternately arranged ears 148, formed on the slide 147. The relationship between the studs 146 and the ears 148*is such that, on operation of the machine with a key depressed, the slide 147 is arrested in a position commensurate with the position of the depressed key. The slide 147 is slotted at its front and rear ends to be supported and slide on collars 149 and 150, carried by studs 151' and 152, respectively.

The slide 147 is provided with teeth 153, meshing with a segment 154 of an arm 155, having a slot 156, into which projects a stud 157 of a latch 158. The arm is rotatably mounted on a stud 159, carried by the framework of the machine. The latch 158 is pivotally mounted on a stud 160, carried by an arm 161, also pivotally supported on the stud 159'. A beam 162 is pivotally mounted on the arm 161 by means of a stud 163. The free end of the beam 162 is provided with a stud 164, which projects into a slot 165 of an arm 166, also pivoted on the stud 159. The arm 166 is provided with a segment 167, meshing with teeth 168 of a control slide 169. The control slide is slidably mounted on the aforesaid collars 149 and 150 and at its upper end on a stud 110, mounted between the frames of the machine (not shown).

The latch 158 is provided with a toe 17th, normally engaging a notch 171 of a differential driver 172. The differential driver 172 is pivoted on the stud 159 and is provided with a notch 173, into which projects a stud 174 on the free end of a lever 175, pivoted on a stud 176, carried by the framework of the machine. The lever 175 is secured to an arm 177 by means of a hub 132. The arm 177 is provided with a pair of rollers 178, which coact with a pair of cam plates 179, secured to, so as to be rotated by, the driving mechanism of the machine (not shown). Reference may be had to the above-mentioned United States patent to Mayo A. Goodbar et al., No.

2,616,623, for a description of the framework and the mechanism which drives the machine. The lever 175 is provided with a roller 131), which is movable into engagement with a surface 181 of the beam 172 in a manner to be described presently.

When the cam plates 179 are rotated, upon operation of the machine, the arm 177 is rocked clockwise to rock the lever 175 clockwise. Clockwise movement of the lever 175, through the stud 17 i and the notch 173, rocks the differential driver 172 in a like direction. This clockwise movement of the driver 172 carries with it the latch 153 and, through the stud 157, rocks the arm 155 clockwise. Clockwise movement of the arm 155, by the segment 154 moves the slide 147 to the right until an ear 148 thereon comes into contact with the stud 146 of the depressed key. This arrests the slide 147 in a position com mensurate with the depressed key and at the same time positions the arm 155 in a corresponding position. Ar-

resting of the arm 155, through coaction of its cam slot 156 with the stud 157, cams the latch 158 counter-clockwise around its stud 160, thus withdrawing the toe 179 from the notch 171, to arrest further movement of the arm 161. Counter-clockwise movement of the latch 158 cams an ear 183 thereon into a corresponding notch 184 of a locking plate 1185, supported by the studs 176 and 152. Continued movement of the driver 172 after the latch 158 has been disengaged therefrom moves a concentric surface 186 thereof beneath the toe 171i and positively locks the latch 158 and the arm 161 in adjusted position, with the result that the stud 163 for the beam 162 is also locked in an adjusted position corresponding to the depressed key.

During the clockwise locking movement of the lever 175, the roller 180 thereon comes into engagement with the surface 181 of the beam 162 and rocks the beam 162 around the stud 163 as a center. The movement of the beam 162 around the stud 163 cams the stud 164 on its lower end into the slot 165 and rocks the arm 166 and the segment 167 into a position corresponding to the position in which the arm 161 has been adjusted and locked by the latch 158. This adjustment of the segment 167, through the teeth 168 on the slide 169, positions the slide 169 corresponding to the adjusted position of the differential slide 147.

After the control slide 169 has been positioned by the beam 162 in the manner just described, the cams 179 return the lever 1'75 counter-clockwise to restore the differential driver 172 to its home position. When the notch 171 again comes beneath the toe 176 during this counterclockwise movement of the driver 172, the toe 1'70 drops behind the notch 171, and then, upon continued counterclockwise movement, the driver 172, acting through a roller 187 thereon, engages the arm 161 and restores the arm 161 and the latch 158 to their home positions. During this movement, the segment 167 and the control slides 169 are held in their adjusted positions by means described in the said Goodbar et al. United States patent, No. 2,616,- 623, and therefore the beam 162 pivots around the stud 164. The segment 167 remains in the adjusted position until readjusted during the next succeeding cycle of operation.

Four notched control plates, 198, 199, 269, and 209 (FIGS. 3, 8, 10,, and 12) are adjusted under control of the first transaction bank for controlling the operation of the novel control mechanism. The second transaction bank positions three notched control plates, 201, 202, and 203 (FIGS. 7, 9, and 11), which coact with the notched control plates of the first transaction bank in controlling the operation of the novel switch-closing mechanism. The structural arrangement of the notched control plates controlled by both the first and second transaction banks is shown in FIG. 5.

The setting of the notched control plates under control of the first transaction bank differential is described herein, and it is understood that the control plates or" the second transaction bank are similarly adjusted by the same operation.

Formed on the under side of the control slide 169 are teeth 188 (FIG. 2), which mesh with a segment 189, rotatably supported by a shaft 19%. Connected to the segment 189 by a hub 191 is a segment 192, which meshes with a ring gear 193 provided with internal teeth and rotatably mounted on a disc 194, carried by a shaft 195. A pinion 196 meshes with the internal teeth of the ring gear 193 and is mounted on a square shaft 197, extending between the frames (not shown) of the machine. Also carried by the square shaft 197 are pinions, similar to the pinion 196, each lying within a ring gear similar to the ring gear 193 (FIGS. 3, and 7 to 12 inclusive). Each of the notched control plates 198, 199, 209, and 2439 (FIGS. 3, 8, 10, and 12) is mounted adjacent one of the ring gears. Through the connections just described, the setting of the control slide 169 adjusts the notched control plates to a position corresponding to the position to which the control slide 169 is adjusted by the differential mechanism under the control of the depressed keys 121 to 129 of the first transaction bank. Referring to FIGS. 3, 8, l0, and 12, each control plate is shown with peripheral markings indicating the position of the control plate corresponding to the keys positioned in the transaction bank. When no key is depressed in the transaction bank, all of the control plates are positioned, in relation to a coacting feeler, described hereinafter, in the tenth position. The notched control plates are shown in the home position. The positioning of the notched control plates 198, 199, 2611, and 299 controls the operation of the novel control mechanism described hereinafter.

The notched control plates controlled by the second transaction bank are adjusted by similar mechanism. For a more complete description of the manner in which the control plates of both transaction banks are adjusted, reference may be had to the previously-mentioned Goodbar et al. United States Patent, No. 2,616,623.

FIG. 13 shows a schematic diagram of the electrical circuit between the change dispenser and the accounting machine. As previously disclosed, the change dispenser is of the type disclosed in the previously-mentioned Paul H. Williams et al. United States Patent, No. 2,954,037, and reference should be made to that patent for any description of the operating structure. The change dispenser includes a series of solenoids, 259 to 257 inclusive, each controlling an individual dispensing apparatus which, upon the energization of its associated solenoid, issues change according to the amount set up in the first two amount banks, or the dime and cent amount banks, of the accounting machine. Under this arrangement, change up to and including ninety-nine cents is dispensed. The solenoid 256, when energized, causes its dispenser apparatus to issue twenty-five cents in change. The solenoid 251 causes its dispenser to issue five cents in change. The solenoid 252 causes its dispenser to issue ten cents in change, as does the solenoid 253. The solenoid 254 causes its dispenser to issue one cent in change. Each of the solenoids 255 and 256 causes its dispenser to issue two cents in change, while the solenoid 257 causes its dispenser to issue fifty cents in change. Included in the change dispenser operating circuit are a motor 258; a clutch solenoid 259, which, when energized, connects the motor to the change dispenser drive mechanism for operating the various dispensing apparatuses; and a doubleacting switch 260. Also included in the change dispenser operating circuit are a normally opened low coin switch 261 and a normally closed no coin switch 262.

Shown in the upper part of FIG. 13 are a series of switches set by the rack differential mechanism of the cent and dime amount banks of the accounting machine. As disclosed more fully in the previously-mentioned United States patent to Everett H. Placke et al., No. 2,774,298, during a clearing of the add-subtract totalizer, the rack differentials of the amount banks will be moved, under the control of the add-subtract totalizer, to a position commensurate with the amount of change to be returned. As shown in FIG. 14, the amount rack 229 of the cent bank, which corresponds to the amount rack 466 (FIG. 20) disclosed in the previously-mentioned Goodbar et al. United States Patent, No. 2,616,623, has mounted on its end an extension 248. The extension 24-8 contains a slot 281 within which is positioned a cross bar 281, on which the extension is supported. A row of teeth 282, located on the top edge of the extension 248, mesh with a pinion 283, secured to a shaft 284, rotatably mounted within the framework of the machine. Another pinion, 285, also secured to the shaft 284-, meshes with teeth 286, located on a switch stem 287. The switch stem 287 is slotted for support by a cross bar 233. It may be seen from FIG. 14 that any movement of the rack 229 is'transmitted over the shaft 284 to move the switch stem 287 a corresponding distance. The rack for the dime amount bank has a similar construction.

Associated with the cent rack are the switches 264 (FIGS. 13 and 14), while the switches 265 and 266 are controlled by the dime rack. The switches are mounted on a support 289, located within the machine. A brush member 290, mounted on a movable support 291, which in turn is attached to the switch stem 287, is positioned by movement of the cent rack 229 to represent the number of cents that are included in the change to be given. Cooperating with the switches 265, 266 are brushes 292, 293, attached to a movable support 294, which is controlled in a similar manner by the dime rack (not shown). From this arrangement, movement of the cent and dime racks, under the control of the add-subtract totalizer, positions the brushes 290, 292, and 293 along the switches 264, 265, and 266 to represent the amount of change to be given.

As shown in FIG. 13, the switch 264 is composed of two identical banks of contacts 267, while the switches 265 and 266 are composed of three banks of contacts. The contacts 267 represent the individual key positions located in the amount banks. Brushes (not shown), similar to the brushes 290, 292, and 293, are attached to the supports 291 and 224 in such a manner that each bank of switches controlled by the same amount rack is set up to represent the same amount. The switches are wired to the solenoids 250 to 257, inclusive in a manner well known in the art, to energize the appropriate solenoids so as to return the minimum number of coins which constitute the change.

Located in the accounting machine but also included in the change-dispenser-operating circuit are a low coin buzzer 268 and switches 269 and 270. The switch 270 is controlled by the novel switch mechanism to be described hereinafter. The switch 269 is cam-operated and closes during every operating cycle of the accounting machine.

When the accounting machine is operated and the switches 269 and 270 close, an energizing circuit is completed to the change dispenser motor 258 and the clutch solenoid 259 from a llO-volt A.C. source over a conductor 272, a fuse 273, through the switches 269 and 270, over the normally closed no coin switch 262, through one side of the double-acting switch 260 to the clutch solenoid 259, over conductor 275 to ground. The circuit to motor 258 is likewise completed over the no-coin switch 262, conductor 300, motor 258, and over conductor 275 to ground. Energization of the clutch solenoid 259 actuates the switch 260 to transfer its contacts, which interrupts the original energizing circuit and completes the circuit over the conductors 271, 274 to the cent and dime amount bank switches 264, 265, and 266. The switches have been set during an accounting machine operation by the dime and cent amount rack differential mechanisms representing the amount of change to be returned. The circuit is continued over the conductors 27 8 to energize the appropriate solenoids so as to dispense change commensurate with the amount set up in the switches. The circuit is completed to the common side 275 of the circuit.

It will be seen that, whenever the switch 270 is closed during an operation of the accounting machine, change is dispensed by the change dispenser commensurate with the amount set up in the cent and dime amount banks.

FIGS. 3, 4, 5, and 6 show the novel switch-closing mechanism for closing the switch 270 to energize the change dispenser. As previously described, operation of the accounting machine results in the setting of the notched control plates 108 to 203 inclusive and 209 (FIGS. 3, and 7 to 12 inclusive) according to the position of the keys depressed in the first and second transaction banks. Associated with these control plates are three feeler links, 204, 205, and 206 (FIGS. 3 and each having a slot 207, for mounting each of the links on a shaft 208, supported in the main framework of the machine. Each of the feeler links 204, 205, and 206 has one end rotatably 11) attached by means of a stud 229 to a bell crank 240, 241, or 242, respectively (FIG. 5). Each of the bell cranks is rotatably supported on a shaft 210, mounted in the main framework of the machine. Located adjacent each of the 1 bell cranks, and rigidly mounted on the shaft 210, is an arm 211, having one end engaging a stud 212, mounted on the side of each of the bell cranks. The shaft 210 is rocked clockwise by a cam (not shown) during each operation of the accounting machine, thereby rocking the arms 211 to release each of the bell cranks for movement. A spring 213, having one end attached to the stud 229 and its other end attached to the shaft 208, normally urges each of the feeler links toward engagement with its associated notched control plate upon the clockwise rocking of the arm 211. The slot 207, located in each feeler link, acts to guide the feeler links toward the notched control plates.

Referring to FIGS. 3 and 5, it will be seen that each feeler link has, mounted at its forward tip, means for I sensing the notches in its associated notched control plate.

Included is a feeler assembly comprising the feeler fingers 214, coacting with the control plate 198 (FIG. 3); 215, coacting with the control plate 201 (FIG. 7); and 216, coacting with the control plate 109 (FIG. 8). The feeler assembly is rotatably mounted on the feeler link 204, by means of a stud 217 (FIG. 3). The tip of the link 204 comprises a finger 218 (FIG. 9), which coacts with the notched control plate 202. It will be seen from FIG. 5 that, if the control plates 198, 199, 201, and 202, associated with the feeler assembly located on the feeler link 204, are so positioned that any of the notches therein are adjacent the finger 218 and either the finger 214 or the fingers 215 and 216, the feeler link 204 is able to move forward under the urging of the spring 213.

The feeler link 205 has, mounted on its forward end, a stud 219 (FIGS. 5 and 10), which coacts with the notched control plate 200 in a manner similar to that described for the feeler assembly on the link 204 above. The link 206 also has mounted on its forward end a stud 220 (FIGS. 5, 11, and 12), which coacts with the notched control plates 203 and 209 in the above-described manner. The operation of the feeler links and the notched control plates will be described more fully in connection with the description of operation of the switch-closing mechanism.

Located within the accounting machine is a support 221 (FIG. 3), which has mounted thereon the low coin buzzer 260 and the switches 269 and 2700f the change dispenser energizing circuit. A cam shaft 222, mounted within the framework of the accounting machine, is positioned adjacent the support 221. Supported on the cam shaft 222 is a cam 223, which coacts with a roller 224, mounted on an arm 225. One end of the arm 225 is loosely mounted on a shaft 226, while the other end of the arm has a finger 227, positioned adjacent the switch 269. The cam shaft 222 is driven clockwise by the main drive shaft (not shown) of the accounting machine, and, during an operation of the machine, the shaft 222 rocks the arm 225 counter-clockwise (FIG. 3), resulting in the finger 227 contacting and closing the switch 269. From this operation, it will be seen that the switch 269 is closed during each cycle of operation of the accounting machine.

Loosely mounted on shaft 228, supported in the framework of the machine, are a pair of switch arms, 230 and 231 (FIGS. 3, 4, 5, and 6), each having a lower extension 232, located adjacent the switch 270. Each of the switch arms 230, 231 has pivotally mounted thereon a link 233 and 234, respectively, the other end of which is attached to one of the bell cranks 240, 241. The link 233 is attached to the bell crank 240, while the link 234 is attached to the bell crank 241. Since the bell crank 240 has one end attached to the feeler link 204, it will be seen from FIGS. 3 and 5 that the feeler link 204 controls the movement of the switch arm 230, while, in a similar manner, the feeler link 205 controls the movement of the switch arm 231.

Positioned adjacent the switch arm 231 is a disabling stop arm 235 (FIGS. 4 and 6), rotatably mounted on the shaft 228. The stop arm 235 is urged clockwise by a spring 236, mounted on a stud 237, located on the stop arm 235. The other end of the spring 236 is attached to a stud 238, mounted on the switch arm 231. By this arrangement, the stop arm is urged by the spring 23s to follow the movement of the switch arm 231.

The switch arm 231 has, at its upper front edge, a recessed portion, which forms a lip 239 (FIGS. 3 and 4). The disabling stop arm 235 has a similar lip, formed by having the lower portion of its front edge recessed. By referring to FIGS. 3 and 4, it will be seen that the upper front edge of the stop arm 235 overlaps the lower front edge of the switch arm 231. Cooperating with the lips of both arms is a switch disabling arm 243, rotatably supported on the shaft 226. One end of the arm 243 has mounted thereon a stud 244, positioned within a slot 245, located in a link 246. The link 2 46 is attached to one end of the bell crank 242, which is mounted on the shaft 216), as previously described. As shown in FIG. 5, one end of the bell crank 242 is rotatably attached to the feeler link 2%. A spring 247, stretched between the stud 24-4 and a stud 2458, mounted on the link 246, urges the disabling arm 243 clockwise. From this arrangement it will e seen that the feeler link 2% controls the movement of the switch disabling arm 243.

The other end of the switth disabling arm 243 has a curved flanged portion 249 (FIGS. 3, 4, 5, and 6), which overlaps both the stop arm 235 and the switch arm 231. When the flanged portion 249 is inserted between the lips of the stop arm 235 and the switch arm 231 in a manner described hereinafter, the switch arm 231 is prevented from moving clockwise to close the switch 270.

The operation of the switch-closing mechanism will now be described in terms of a typical transaction involving the use of the accounting machine and the change dispenser. In handling a number of checks to be cashed, the bank teller first depresses the List key, in the first transacto-n bank, then indexes the amount of the first check on the keyboard and depresses the Cashed Checks key, in the second transaction bank. Depression of the Cashed Checks key initiates an operation of the accounting machine, and the amount indexed on the keyboard is entered into the add portion of the add-subtract totalizer. Since the List key is in the No. 3 position of the first transaction bank, all notched control plates controlled by the first transaction bank are so positioned. As previously disclosed, the notched control plates 1%, 199, 2%, and 209 are controlled by the first transaction bank. Referring to FIGS. 3, 8, l0, and 12, it will be seen that the notched control plates 199 and 299 both have notches in the third position. During the operation of the accounting machine, both of the control plates will have positioned a notch adjacent their coacting feeler fingers. In a similar manner, the notched control plates 2M (FIG. 7), 292 (FIG. 9), and 2% (FIG. 11), controlled by [the second transaction bank, are positioned to correspond to the No. 1 key position. Only the notched control plates 262 (FIG. 9) and 2% (FIG. 11) have a notch in he No. 1 position. As the result of the positioning of all of the notched control plates of both transaction banks, only the feeler link 2% is able to move, due to the positioning of the notches of the control plates 2.03 and 209 adjacent the sensing stud 226, located on the head of the feeler link 2&6.

Referring to FIG. 2, it was previously disclosed that each bell crank mounted on the shaft 210 has a stud 212, which is engaged by an arm 211, rigidly mounted on the shaft 21 This arrangement prevents the forward movement of the link 2% under the urging of its associated spring 213 until the shaft 21% is rocked clockwise by the driving mechanism of the accounting machine. This movement of the shaft 214; results in the rocking of the arm 211i away from the stud 212, thereby allowing each feeler link to be controlled by its associated spring, as described previously. In this example, only the feeler link 2% moves forward, rocking its associated bell crank 242 clockwise about the shaft 210. This movement of the bell crank is transmitted by the link 246 to the switch disablin arm 243, resulting in the arms being rocked counter-clockwise to the dotted position shown in FIG. 3. Counter-clockwise movement of the disabling arm 243 rotates the flange 249 out of engagement with the lips of the stop arm 235 and the switch arm 231. When this occurs, the stop arm 235 is rotated clockwise under the urging of the spring 236 until the bottom of the stop arm engages the stud 238. The switch arm 23]. is now conditioned to be operated to close the switch 270 on a subsequent machine operation.

At the end of the machine operation, the arms 211 are rocked counter-clockwise by the shaft 2210, thereby engaging the stud 212 on each of the bell cranks are, 24. and 242, resulting in a counter-clockwise movement of the bell cranks. This resets each of the feeler links to its original position. The disabling stop arm 243 is rocked clockwise, but, since the stop arm 235 has been moved down into a blocking position, the flange portion of the disabling stop arm engages the outer front surface of the stop 265. The slot 245 in the link 246 allows the disabling stop arm 2.43 to remain in such an adjusted position. By this arrangement, the disabling stop arm 243 is prevented from blocking the movement of the switch arm 231 once it has moved from. a blocking position. As described hereinafter, the switch arm 231 must be rotated to a switch-closing position before the disabling stop arm 2 53 can be returned to its blocking position. Thus any number of intermediate transactions can now be carried out on the accounting machine without affecting the condition of the switch arm 23 1.

If more than one check is to be cashed, the above operation is repeated. After the amount of each check has been recorded, the total of the checks cashed for the customer appears in the visible dial, indicating the total amount to be given to the customer. An operation of the accounting machine is then initiated by depression of the Total key, in the first transaction bank. During this operation of the machine, all of the notched control plates controlled by the first transaction bank are adjusted to the No. 1 position. Only the notched control plate 200 (FIG. 10) has a notch in the No. 1 position. This allows the feeler link 205 to be moved forward under the action of the spring 213. Referring to FIG. 5, it will be seen that the feeler link 2% controls the switch arm 23:1. Movement of the link 205 rocks the switch arm 231 counter-clockwise, thereby allowing its lower extension 232 to close the switch 270, which results in the energization of the change dispenser to issue change according to the amount set up in the add-subtract totalizer. Counter clockwise movement of the switch arm 231 also results in the counter-clockwise movement of the stop arm 235. As both of the arms move counter-clockwise the flange portion of the disabling stop arm 243 is slipped underneath the overhang portion of the lip of the arm 235 due to the urging of the spring 2247. Upon the resetting of the arm 21-1, the switch arm 231 is rocked clockwise. When the stop arm 235 follows the movement of the switch arm 231, the overhang portion of the lip engages the flange 249 of the disabling stop arm 2 .3, which action stops the movement of the stop arm 236. As the clockwise movement of the switch arm 231 continues, the flange portion 249 of the disabling stop arm is moved farther between the lips of the stop arm 235 and the switch arm 231 under the urging of the spring 247. In this position, the switch arm 23-1 is locked from movement to a switch-closing position.

From the above operation it is seen that the closing of the switch 27h is conditioned upon the movement of the link 206 followed by the subsequent operation of the link 205. Since the switch 270 may also be closed upon actuation of the switch arm 260, the operation of the arm will now be discussed. Referring to FIG. 5, there are shown the notched control plates 198, 201, 1199, and 2&2, coacting with the teeler assembly located on the teeler 2%. Since the feeler assembly is pivotally supported on the head of the teeler link 2104, the positioning of notches adjacent the feeler finger 218, in combination with the finger 214 or the fingers 2'15 and 2-16, results in the clockwise movement of the bell crank 2 30 and the the counter-clockwise movement of the switch arm 230, thereby closing the switch 270. When cashing checks in a banking transaction, the teller indexes the amount of the check on the keyboard and depresses the Cashed Checks key, in the second transaction bank, thereby initiating an operation of the machine. This adjusts each of the notched control plates controlled by the second transaction bank to the first position. As may be seen from FIG. 9, a notch in the plate 292 is positioned adjacent the finger 2'18 of the link 294. Since no key has been depressed in the first transaction hank, each of the notched control plates controlled by that bank is positioned automatically in position 10. As seen in FIG. 3, this positions a notch in the notched control plate 198 adjacent the finger 2/14. Upon movement of the shaft 210 during the operation of the machine, i re link 204 is moved forward, thus rocking the switch arm 230' to close the switch 270. As may be seen from FIG. 9, there is another notch in the No. 5 position of the notched control plate 202. This corresponds to the Cash-Out key. The use of this key by itself results in the dispensing of change in the same manner as that of the Oashed Checks key.

Use of the Cash Out key with the List key results in the setting of the notched control plates 201 (FIG. 7) and 202 (FIG. 9 in the fifth position. The notched control plate 199, con-trolled by the first transaction bank, is also positioned in the No. 3 position, and, as shown in FIG. 8, this positions a notch adjacent the rfeeler finger 216. Upon release of the bell cranks by the shaft 210, the feeler link 2.04 is moved forward by its associated spring 213, resulting in the closing of the switch 270.

In the first example above disclosing the operation of the switch-closing mechanism, it shown that the operation of the machine with the Cashed Ohecks key and the List key depressed conditions the switch-closing mechanism to allow the switch arm 23! to close the switch 270 upon the subsequent use of the Total key. FIG. 11 shows the notched control plate 203, having in the third position a notch which corresponds to the Amount Tendered key. Use of this with the List key, followed by the use of the Total key in the manner described above, results in the same operation.

In the embodiment being described, it will be seen that, to operate the switch arm 231 in a switch-closing operation, the switch-disabling arm 243 must be moved to a non-blocking position. This conditions the switch arm 231 to be moved to a switch-closing position upon the subsequent use of the Total key. Where the switch arm 230 is used to close the switch 270, a single key, such as the Cashed Checks key or the Cash O L'i-i key, moves the switch arm 2'30 to a switch-closing position. Use of the List key with the Cash Out key also moves the switch arm 230 to a switch-closing position. From the above disclosure, it is obvious that any arrangement of keys may be used 'to condition the switch arm 231 for movement or to actuate the switch arm 230 to actuate the change dispenser.

While the form of mechanism shown and described herein is admirably suited to fulfill the objects primarily state, it is to be understood that it is not intended to conline the invention to the form or embodiment disclosed herein, for it is susceptible of embodiment in various other forms, all coming within the scope and spirit of the invention.

What is claimed is;

1. In a machine of the class described constructed and arranged to perform non-.change-dlspensing machine operations and change-dispensing machine operations, the combination of (a) a plurality of differentially-settable members;

(b) a plurality of keys tor controlling the extent of movement of the settable members during each machine operation;

(c) a change-dispensing apparatus;

(d) electrical circuit means for initiating, when activated, an operation of said change-dispensing apparatus, said circuit means including a switch for activating, when operated, said circuit means;

(2) a switch-operating member movable to a position operating said switch;

(1) means mounted adjacent said switch-operating member and normally positioned to block said me her from moving to a switch-operating position;

(g) first operating means controlled by the movement of said diiferentially-settable members to move said blocking means to a non-blocking position during a first non-change-dispensing machine operation;

(h) and second operating means controlled by the movement of said ditferentially-settable members to move said switch operating member to .a position operating said switch during a subsequent changedispensing machine operation whereby said electrical circuit means initiates an operation oi? said change-dispensing apparatus.

2.. In a machine of the class described constructed and arranged to perform non-change-dispensing machine operations and change-dispensing machine operations, the combination of (a) plurality of difierentially-settable members;

(17) .a plurality of keys for controlling the extent of movement of the settable members during each machine operation;

(c) a change-dispensing apparatus;

(d) electrical circuit means for initiating, when activated, an operation of said change-dispensing apparatus, said circuit means including a switch for activating, when operated, said circuit means;

(e) a switch-operating member movable to a position operating said switch;

(f) means mounted adjacent said switch-operating member and normally positioned to block said member from moving to a switch-operating position;

(g) a plurality of control discs settable under control of the diiferentially-settable members during each machine operation;

(h) and means controlled by the control discs to move said blocking means to a non-blocking position during a first non-change-dispensing machine operation and to move said switch-operatiing member to a position operating said switch during a subsequent change-dispensing machine operation whereby said electrical circuit means initiates an operation of said change-dispensing apparatus.

3. In a machine of the class described constructed and arranged to perform non-change-dispensing machine operations and change-dispensing machine operations, the combination of a plurality of differentially settable transaction mechanisms;

a plurality of transaction keys for controlling the movement of said transaction mechanisms;

a change-dispensing mechanism for dispensing change when operated;

a circuit for controlling the operation of said dispensing mechanism including a switch operable w en closed to activate said circuit for operating said dispensing mechanism;

a switch-actuating member movable to a switch-closing position;

a rotatable member located adjacent said actuating member;

an arm mounted for rotation and having a flange portion normally positioned between the actuating member and the rotatable member to block the movement of said actuating member to a change dispensing position;

a plurality of differentially settable control discs settable under the control of said transaction mechanisms during a machine operation;

a first means controlled by said control discs for rotating the flange portion of said rotatable arm to a nonblocking position during a first non-change-dispensing machine operation;

means connected between said actuating member and said rotatable member for urging said rotatable member towards said actuating member upon the movement of the flange portion of said rotatable arm to a non-blocking position, thereby preventing the return movement of the said flange portion to a blocking position;

and a second means controlled by said control discs for operating said switch-actuating member during a subsequent change-dispensing machine operation whereby said change-dispensing mechanism is energized to dispense change.

4. The machine of claim 3 in which said switch-actuating member has an upper recessed portion and said rotatable member has a lower recessed portion, both of said recessed portions forming a slot within which is positioned the flange portion of said arm, thereby blocking the movement of the actuating member towards a switch-closing position.

5. In a machine of the class described constructed and arranged to perform non-change-dispensing machine operations and change-dispensing machine operations, the combination of a plurality of differentially settable trnasaction mechanisms;

a plurality of selectively operable transaction keys cooperating with said difierential mechanisms in order that said differential mechanisms may be set by an operated transaction key;

a change-dispensing mechanism;

electrical circuit means for initiating, when activated, an operation of said change-dispensing mechanism, said circuit means including a switch for activating, when operated, said circuit means;

a switch-operating member movable to a position operating said switch;

means mounted adjacent said switch-operating member and normally positioned to block said member from moving to a switch-operating change dispensing position;

a plurality of differentially settable control discs having a number of sensing surfaces, said discs settable under the control of said transaction mechanisms to position a sensing surface, corresponding to the operated transaction key, in a sensing position;

a first sensing means coacting with a sensing surface set in a sensing position during a non-change-dispensing machine operation to move said blocking means to a non-blocking position;

and a second sensing means coacting with a sensing surface set in a sensing position during a subsequent change-dispensing machine operation to move said switch-operating member to a position operating said switch whereby said electrical circuit means initiates an operation of said change-dispensing mechanism.

6. In a machine of the class described constructed and arranged to perform non-change-dispensing machine operations and change-dispensing machine operations, the combination of a plurality of differentially settable transaction mechanisms;

a plurality of selectively operable transaction keys cooperating with said differential mechanisms in order that said differential mechanisms may be set by an operated transaction key;

a change-dispensing mechanism for dispensing change when operated;

an electrical circuit for controlling the operation of said dispensing mechanism including a switch operable when closed to activate said circuit;

a switch-actuating member movable to a switch-closing change-dispensing position;

a first rotatable arm located adjacent said switch-actuating member;

a second rotatable arm having a flange portion;

resilient means normally urging said second rotatable arm to position the flange portion between the switchactuating member and the first rotatable arm to block the movement of the actuating member to a switchclosing position;

a plurality of differentially settable control discs having a number of sensing surfaces, said discs settable under control of said transaction mechanisms to position a sensing surface in a sensing position;

a first sensing means coacting with said control discs and operable upon sensing a plurality of sensing surfaces during a first non-change-dispensing machine operation to rotate said flange portion to a non-blocking position;

means moving said first rotatable arm to a position blocking the return movement of said flange portion, under the urging of said resilient means, to a blocking position;

and a second sensing means coacting with said control discs and operable upon sensing a sensing surface during a subsequent change-dispensing machine operation to move said switch-actuating member to a switch-closing position whereby said circuit is activated to operate said change-dispensing mechanism.

7. The machine of claim 6 in which said sensing surfaces comprise notches and said sensing means comprises feelers; resilient means normally urging said feelers toward said notches; and means normally blocking the movement of said feelers and operable upon operation of said machine to release said feelers for a sensing movement.

8. The machine of claim 6 in which said switch-actuating member has an upper recessed portion and said first rotatable arm has a lower recessed portion, both of said recessed portions forming a slot within which is positioned the flange portion of said second rotatable arm to block the movement of the actuating member to a switch-closing position and said resilient means includes a resilient member attached between the actuating member and the first rotatable arm urging, upon the rotation of said flange portion to a non-blocking position, said first rotatable arm to a position blocking the return of said flange portion to a blocking position, thereby enabling said actuating member to be moved to a switch-closing position.

9. In a machine of the class described constructed and arranged to perform non-change-dispensing machine operations and change-dispensing machine operations, the combination of a plurality of differentially settable members; manually operable means for controlling the extent of movement of the settable members;

a change-dispensing mechanism;

switching means operable for initiating an operation of said dispensing mechanism;

a member movable to a position to close said switching means, said member having a lower lip portion;

a rotatable arm having an upper lip portion, said lip portion forming a slot with the lower lip portion of said switch-closing member;

rotatable means positioned Within said slot to block 1 7 movement of said member to a switch-operating position;

a plurality of differentially settable control discs settable under control of said settable members, said discs containing a number of notches;

a first sensing means coacting with said control discs during a first non-change-dispensing machine operation and operable upon sensing a notch to rotate said blocking means to a non-blocking position;

and a second sensing means coacting with said control discs during a subsequent change-dispensing machine operation and operable upon sensing of a notch in a control disc to move said member to a position operating said switching means whereby said change-dispensing mechanism is operated.

10. In a machine of the class described constructed and arranged to perform non-change-dispensing machine operations and change-dispensing machine operations, the combination of a plurality of differentially settable members;

a plurality of selectably operable transaction keys for controlling the positioning of the differentially settable members during each machine operation;

a change-dispensing mechanism;

an electrical circuit for controlling the operation of said 25 dispensing mechanism, said circuit including a first and second normally open switching means;

a member movable to a position for closing said first switching means;

cam means operable during each machine operation to close said second switching means;

a rotatable arm having a portion engaging said member to block the movement of said member to a switchclosing position;

a plurality of differentially settable control discs settable under control of said settable members, said discs containing a plurality of notches each representing a transaction key;

a first sensing means coacting with said control discs during a first non-change-dispensing machine operation and operable upon sensing notches representing the operated transaction key to rotate the portion of said rotatable arm to a non-blocking position;

and a second sensing means coacting with said control discs during a subsequent change-dispensing machine operation and operable upon sensing of a notch in one of said control discs to move said member to a switch-closing position whereby said electrical circuit is activated to operate said change-dispensing mechanism.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,605,774 Damon Aug. 5, 1952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2605774 *Sep 3, 1946Aug 5, 1952Johnson Fare Box CompanyTen key coin issuing device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4359062 *Apr 11, 1980Nov 16, 1982Brandt, Inc.Electronic coin dispenser
US5411436 *Oct 14, 1992May 2, 1995Kaplan; Jeffrey I.Currency dispenser
Classifications
U.S. Classification453/2, 453/17
Cooperative ClassificationG07D1/00