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Publication numberUS3126206 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 24, 1964
Filing dateFeb 20, 1962
Publication numberUS 3126206 A, US 3126206A, US-A-3126206, US3126206 A, US3126206A
InventorsDanial Joseph Sabia
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Practice golf club and tethered ball
US 3126206 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PRACTICE GOLF CLUB AND TETHERED BALL Filed Feb. 20, 1962 -INVENTOR.

D. J. SAB/A BY wig/g AGENT United States Patent G 3,126,206 PRACTICE GOLF CLUB AND TETHERED BALL Danial Joseph Sabia, 46 Mechanic St., New Rochelle, N.Y., assignor of twenty-five percent to Leo Isacson and twenty-five percent to Richard A. Levy Filed Feb. 20, 1962, Ser. No. 174,431 4 Claims. (Cl. 273-136) This invention relates to golfing apparatus, and more particularly, to practice devices for improving a golfers swing.

Physical principles dictate that in order for a projectile to be propelled through space in a particular direction, it must experience a force vectorially aligned with the desired course of travel. When applied to a golf shot, these principles pronounce that the initial direction of travel of the ball, in azimuth, is coplanar with the are described by the movement of the club face during impact. In other words, proper motion of the club head at the socalled bottom of a swing is critical in accomplishing a satisfactory shot. Although these principles are probably well known to the majority of golfers, their corrective application to the game usually requires considerable practice. In order to practice the golf swing constructively, it is imperative that the one practicing receive some indication of the swings quality so that corrective measures may be taken if necessary.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to indicate the quality of a practice golf swing.

It is another object of this invention to indicate at the conclusion of a practice swing whether or not club head motion relative to the ball was satisfactory at the impact position of the stroke. A related, but more specific object of the invention, is to indicate if the motion of the club head at the impact position is properly aligned with the balls desired direction of travel.

It is another object of the invention to simulate a golf shot and indicate its quality without the necessity of impact between club head and ball.

The objects of the invention are accomplished, broadly, by a golf club which is constructed to include a hollow, open-ended channel extending through the front and rear surfaces of its head. In the embodiment of the invention to be described below, the channel assumes the form of a depression in the upper surface of the head which commences at the face of the club, completely traverses the head in a rearwardly direction and is sufiiciently wide throughout to admit passage of a golf ball through its entire length.

The objects and features of the invention will be more thoroughly understood by reference to the following detailed description of a preferred embodiment of the invention in conjunction with the drawing, of which FIGS. 1 and 2, respectively, illustrate front and top views of a golf club constructed in accordance with the principles of the invention. Identical parts of the club are designated by the same reference numeral in both figures of the drawing.

With reference to the drawing, FIGS. 1 and 2 being considered jointly, a golf club is shown comprising a thin tapered shaft 1 of circular cross section coupled to a club head 2 by a collar 18. Shaft 1 is preferably constructed of a resilient material and includes a rubberized gripping sleeve coaxially disposed on the shaft at the end remote from club head 2. As shown in the drawing, club head 2 comprises a neck 3, an upper surface 4, a heel 5, a toe 6, an under surface 7, a face 8, and a rear surface 9. Neck 3 is circular in cross section at its upper extremity md extends downwardly with increasing diameter toward lower surface 7 at approximately a sixty degree angle. The club head is bounded on its four sides by face 8, toe 6, rear surface 9, and heel 5.

3,126,206 Patented Mar. 24, 1964 While face 8 is substantially flat, being the surface on an ordinary golf club which strikes the ball, toe 6, rear surface & and heel 5 form a single, continuous, circularly curved surface. The four sides of club head 2 extend downwardly to a common lower surface 7, and three of the sides, namely face 8, toe 6 and rear surface 9, extend upwardly to a common upper surface 4. At a point remote from toe 6, upper surface 4 curves upwardly in a concaved manner and continues into the front surface of neck 3. Heel 5 extends upwardly at approximately a sixty degree angle to lower surface 7 and, being curved, continues into the back surface of neck 3.

According to the invention, a centralized, open channel 10, comprising side walls 11 and a floor 12, extends vertically downward into the club head from upper surface 4 toward lower surface 7. As shown, channel 10 is open at both ends, commencing at face 8 and extending perpendicularly rearward through rear surface 9, and may taper slightly as it proceeds downwardly. In effect, club head 2 is divided by channel 10 into two separate sections which are joined together at the base of the channel by a thin bridge 13. It will become evident from a description of the manner in which the invention is preferably used that the average width of channel 10, that is to say the average distance separating side wall 11 from each other, is usually slightly larger than the diameter of a conventional golf ball, one and three-quarters inches for example.

In order to indicate the quality of ones swing by means of the invention, or more specifically, to determine whether or not club head motion at the impact position of the swing is properly aligned with the balls desired direction of travel, a relatively small object, preferably a light-weight sphere of durable material and having the dimensions of a conventional golf ball, is supported above ground at a height which is slightly in ex cess of the thickness of bridge 13. Preferably, the sphere is supported by an angular suspension arm 14 which is driven upright into the ground from one end, while the sphere, or simulated golf ball, is suspended by a flexible filament 15 from the other end. Once this has been accomplished, the golfer addresses the sphere as he would a golf ball in preparation for a normal shot, and in so doing usually positions club head 2 such that the vertical plane longitudinal bisecting channel 10 not only bisects the sphere, but in addition, is aligned with the direction in which it would be desired to propel the sphere were the sphere a golf ball. Lastly, the golfer simulates an actual golf shot by exercising his normal swing and then observing whether or not the sphere has remained substantially stationary throughout. If the swing is satisfactory, that is to say, if in the vicinity of the sphere club head 2 describes an are which is both substantially coplanar with the vector defining the desired direction of the ball in the simulated shot and substan tially tangent to the ground, the sphere passes through channel 10 without engaging either one of side walls 11 or floor 12. On the other hand, if the motion of the club head in the vicinity of the sphere includes a component of more than negligible magnitude in a direction transverse to the vertical plane longitudinally bisecting the channel, which normally results in a balls curving from its straight course in flight, the sphere will be struck by one of the side walls 11. Accordingly, if the sphere remained stationary during the simulated shot, it is an indication that the golfers swing was satisfactory from the standpoint of proper club head motion.

As shown in the drawing, under surface 7 of the club head includes a recessed area, extending from face 8 to rear surface 9, in which a plate 16 is fitted and secured in position by a plurality of screws 17. Since bridge 13 is a relatively thin member, but positioned to receive severe shock during a practice swing, plate 16 is preferably constructed of a sturdy metal so as to serve as a reinforcing member for the bridge. In addition, the metal from which plate 16 is fabricated may be sufficiently heavy to compensate for the loss in club weight due to the presence of channel 10. Although the use of one or more properly weighted reinforcing plates 16 to bring the weight of the invention up to the weight of a conventional golf club is particularly advantageous, for example, because the weight of a finished club may be varied by the simple expedient of changing plates, it should be evident that numerous other methods are available for suitably weighting the club.

Although only a single embodiment of the invention is described herein, it should be evident that numerous other arrangements may be devised without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A golf club adapted to indicate the quality of a practice swing comprising; in combination; a shaft; a club head; said club head including a substantially planar face surface, a body which extends rearwardly therefrom to an arcuate rear surface, a top surface, and a substantially planar bottom surface positioned with respect to said shaft for striking engagement with the ground during said practice swing; and means for coupling said shaft to said club head such that the axis of said shaft both lies in a plane substantially parallel to the plane of said face surface and is angular to the plane of said bottom surface; said club head integrally including a depression in said top surface thereof in the form of a straight, hollow, open-ended channel commencing at said face surface and extending rearwardly therefrom through said rear surface; said depression descending downward from said top surface toward said bottom surface such that the depth of said channel is substantially coextensive with the vertical dimension of said club head, and only a thin bridge exists between the bottom of said channel and said bottom surface; the width of said channel throughout its entire length being of sufficient dimension to admit passage of a golf ball therethrough.

2. A golf club in accordance with claim 1 wherein said bottom surface comprises a reinforcing plate.

3. A golf club in accordance with claim 2 wherein said reinforcing plate is suitably weighted to compensate for the weightless void of said channel.

4. Golf training apparatus comprising a simulated golf ball; an angular suspension arm; and a filament for suspending said simulated ball from said arm; a golf club comprising a shaft; a club head; said club head including frontal, rear, top and bottom surfaces; and means for coupling said shaft to said club head such that said bottom surface is positioned for striking engagement with the ground during a golf swing with said club; said club head intergrally including a depression in said top surface thereof in the form of a straight, hollow, open-ended channel extending continuously from said frontal surface to said rear surface; said depression descending downward from said top surface toward said bottom surface such that the depth of said channel is substantially coextensive with the vertical dimension of said club head, and only a thin bridge exists between the bottom of said channel and said bottom surface; the width of said channel throughout its entire length being of sufficient dimension to admit passage of said simulated golf ball therethrough.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 964,473 Kane et al. July 12, 1910 1,960,110 Iles May 22, 1934 2,621,044 Sloan Dec. 9, 1952 2,929,632 Moffatt Mar. 22, 1960 3,035,839 Coglianese May 22, 1962

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US964473 *Jan 22, 1910Jul 12, 1910James N CrabbGame apparatus.
US1960110 *Jun 26, 1930May 22, 1934Stanley Iles AlbertGolf club
US2621044 *Jan 5, 1951Dec 9, 1952Sloan Joseph BPractice attachment for golf clubs
US2929632 *Oct 1, 1957Mar 22, 1960Moffatt Clinton DGolf practice device
US3035839 *Nov 2, 1960May 22, 1962Michael W CoglianeseGolf club
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3226123 *Oct 12, 1962Dec 28, 1965Roraback Harry GBalanced golf club head including flat alignment shoulder between reduced toe and thickened heel
US3231271 *Jun 28, 1963Jan 25, 1966Murphy William EApparatus for practicing strokes with a tennis racket
US3866912 *Nov 5, 1973Feb 18, 1975Scainetti Jack PTennis-stroke practice target combination
US4105204 *May 6, 1977Aug 8, 1978Koenig Wilbur VTennis stroke practice device
US4174838 *Jun 30, 1978Nov 20, 1979Paschetto Paul EGolf putter aligning device
US4573685 *Sep 19, 1984Mar 4, 1986Banff Golf Company, Inc.Golf club head with transparent striking face
US4909515 *Nov 21, 1988Mar 20, 1990Redkey Robert HGolf practice club
US4930783 *Sep 18, 1984Jun 5, 1990Antonious A JGolf club
US4944517 *Dec 6, 1989Jul 31, 1990Redkey Robert HGolf practice club
US6146287 *Dec 1, 1998Nov 14, 2000Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club head with weighted sole in stiffened region
US6554716 *Aug 9, 2000Apr 29, 2003James Cheng Wah LohGolf “swing for accuracy” mat
US6974389Nov 19, 1999Dec 13, 2005Yoshihiko ShiodaGolf practice and exercise device
US7118489Dec 4, 2004Oct 10, 2006Bruce HubleyGolf swing training device
US20020082101 *Dec 22, 2000Jun 27, 2002Yoshihiko ShiodaGolf practice system
US20020111222 *Apr 17, 2002Aug 15, 2002Yoshihiko ShiodaGolf practice and exercise device
US20040063509 *Sep 25, 2003Apr 1, 2004Yoshihiko ShiodaGolf practice and exercise device
US20070032305 *Jul 31, 2006Feb 8, 2007Heinbigner Leonard FGolf swing practice device
US20120058836 *Aug 1, 2011Mar 8, 2012Menafra Michael SGolf club and method for use to improve golf game
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/147, 473/236
International ClassificationA63B69/36
Cooperative ClassificationA63B69/3632
European ClassificationA63B69/36D2