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Publication numberUS3128031 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 7, 1964
Filing dateAug 10, 1960
Priority dateAug 10, 1960
Publication numberUS 3128031 A, US 3128031A, US-A-3128031, US3128031 A, US3128031A
InventorsDembo Gerald
Original AssigneeDembo Gerald
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carton
US 3128031 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April Z, 1964 G. DEMBO 3,128,031

' CARTON Filed Aug. 10, 1960 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. GERALD DEMBU A 7' TOR/V5 Y April 7, 1964 DEMBQ 3,128,031

CARTON Filed Aug. 10, 1960 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 4 i l l INVENTOR. GERALD DEMBO BY ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,128,031 CARTQN Gerald Dernbo, 850 Field Sh, Lakewood, Colo. Filed Aug. 10, 19519, Ser. No. 43,719 8 Ciaims. (Cl. 229-7) This invention relates to cartons, and more particularly to cartons which may be reduced in size as the contents thereof are used.

In modern-day homes and more particularly the kitchen, storage space has become increasingly scarce, with the advent of numerous electrical appliances, cooking utensils, packaged food, and cooking products. Today, many products are packaged in cardboard cartons, such as dry cereal, dog meal, soap powders, sugar and other products. With such cartons, no matter how much of the product has been used from the carton, the carton retains its original size and takes up as much space on the shelf as a full carton. Also, there is no way to tell when a carton is practically empty so that an additional supply may be ordered, without removing the carton from the shelf and looking inside. Many of these prodnets are packaged in large, economy size boxes which multiplies the storage problems.

Among the objects of this invention are to provide a carton which decreases in size as the contents are used; to provide a carton which saves storage space; to provide a carton which may be reduced in size so that several cartons may be stacked one upon the other; to provide a carton which provides an indication of the amount of the contents therein and an indication when it is nearly empty and another carton should be purchased; to provide a carton which may be reduced in size by successively discarding portions thereof as the contents are used; to provide a carton which when partly empty is substantially smaller than the original full carton, thereby being more compact and saving space; and to provide a novel carton which may be reduced in size as its contents are used but for which the initial manufacturing cost is not unduly increased over prior conventional cartons.

Additional objects and the novel features of this invention will become apparent from the description which follows, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a front perspective view of a novel carton of this invention, showing the front, top and one side;

FIG. 2 is a condensed, rear perspective view of the carton of FIG. 1, showing the back, top and the same side as in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary rear perspective view, on an enlarged scale, showing the opposite side and a portion of the top and back of the carton;

FIG. 4 is a vertical section, taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 3, but showing the carton with an upper section removed and a portion of the back bent down to form a new top for the carton; and

FIG. 5 is a vertical section similar to FIG. 4, but showing the carton with two upper sections removed and another portion of the back folded down to form a new top for the carton.

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 3, a carton constructed in accordance with this invention is basically a conventional carton having a front 10, a back 11, a first side 12 integral with the front and back, a second side 13 integral with the adjacent edge of front and attached, as by adhesive, to a flange 14 which is folded forwardly from the adjacent edge of back 11, as seen in FIG. 1. The top of the carton is conveniently formed by a lower flap 15 folded rearwardly from the top edge of front 10 and an upper flap 16 folded forwardly from the top edge of back 11. Upper flap 16 extends over a portion of lower ice flap 15 and is attached therealong, as by a suitable adhesive, to seal the carton. Flaps may also extend inwardly from the upper edge of each side, beneath the top flaps 15 and 16, such short flaps being conventional and therefore not shown. The bottom of the carton may be formed in substantially the same manner as the top, as in FIGS. 4 and 5, by an inner flap 17 folded forwardly from back 11 and an outer flap 18 folded rearwardly from front 10, extending over a portion of inner flap 17 and attached thereto, as by a suitable adhesive. Although the carton will be described as a cereal box, it will be understood that the car-ton of this invention may be used for other products, such as dog meal, soap flakes, sugar or other items, in which the contents of the carton are used over a period of time. An opening tab 19 is provided at the center of top flap 16, which may be used to break the seal between flaps 15 and 16 and provide access to the contents of the carton. In the conventional carton, after the desired amount of the contents has been removed, the flaps are again folded to the position shown in FIG. 1. Thus, in the conventional carton, no matter how much of the contents have been used, the carton retains its original size, taking up as much space on a shelf or other storage space as a full carton.

With the carton of this invention, however, the carton may be reduced in size as the contents are used. This is accomplished by providing a pair of lateral, parallel rows of perforations 2t and 21 across front 10, side 12, and side 13. Perfor-ations 20' are spaced approximately the same distance from the top of the carton as the width of the sides, while perforations 21 are spaced approximately the same distance below the row of perforations 20. Also, a row of perforations 22 extends upwardly along the intersection of side 12 and back 11, as shown in FIG. 3, from perforations 21 to the top of the car-ton. The portion of front 10 and sides 12 and 13 above perforations 20, including inner flap 15, forms a first removable section S, while the portion of front 10 and sides 12 and 13 between perforations 21B and 221 forms a second removable section S. These sections may be removed successively as the contents of the carton are used to reduce the height of the carton. Although two removable sections have been shown, a single removable section or three or more removable sections may be provided, depending on the size of the carton and the rate at which its contents are expected to be used. To facilitate removal of section S, a tab 23 extends rearwardly from side 13 at the center of section 8', to permit separating section S and separation of side 13 where it is adhered along flange 14, and similarly to facilitate removal of section S, a tab 24 extends rear-wardly from side 13 at the center of section S.

When the contents of the carton have reached a level below perforations 20, it is merely necessary to pull outwardly on tab 23 to break the seal between side 13 and flange 14, separate side 13 along the perforations and then across front 10 and side 12, and finally upwardly along perforations 22, completely separating section S from the rest of the carton. When the contents of the carton have reached a level below perforations 21, section S may be removed by pulling on tab 24, to pull side 13 from flange 14 and separate side 13 along perforations 21, then across front 10 and side 12 and finally upwardly along perforations 22 So that the carton may be more readily closed after section S and then section S have been removed, the back 11 has a pair of parallel score lines 25 and 26 which are spaced from the top of the carton the same distance as perforations 20 and 21, respectively, as seen in FIG. 2. Also, flange 14 is provided with perforations 27 and 28 which are likewise spaced .2 from the top of the carton the same distance as perforations 20 and 21, as shown in FIG. 1. Therefore, once section S has been removed, it is merely necessary to fold the top portion of flange 14 inwardly, causing it to tear along perforations 27. Next, the back is folded downwardly and forwardly along scoreline 25, from the dotted to the full position shown in FIG. 4, so that the top portion 30 thereof forms a new top for the carton and the top flap 16 extends inside the box behind front 10, with portion 31 of flange 14 beneath the then top 3%. In a conventional cereal box which is 9 inches high, 6% inches wide and 2 inches deep, in accordance with the spacing of perforations 29 as previously described, the top portion 30 of back 11 will be 2 inches in height, thus providing the correct dimensions for a new top. Thus in the conventional 9 inch cereal box, there will immediately be a saving of 27 cubic inches when the contents of the box reach a level below the row of perforations 20 by removing section S. Upon further use of the contents, additional space may be saved, once the level of the contents is below the level of perforations 21, by removing section S, as described above.

After section S is separated from the rest of the carton and the carton is to be closed, the next portion 32 of flange 14 is folded inwardly, causing it to be torn along perforations 28 and then a second portion 33 of the back is 'folded downwardly and forwardly, along score line 26, to form a new top for the carton, as in FIG. 5. At the same time, flap 16 is folded back under portion 30 with previously separated portion 31 of flange 14 between one end of portion 3% and flap 16, not shown in FIG. for clarity of illustration, and portion 30 is placed down inside the box behind front 10. Thus, once the level of the contents of carton C decreases below the line of perforations 21, the height of a 9 inch carton may be reduced by 4 inches, resulting in a space saving of approximately 56 cubic inches. Since sections S and S are torn from the carton as it is used, they may be folded flat before being discarded. Since the spacing between perforations 20 and 21 and between scorelines 25 and 26 is equal to the width of sides 12 and 13, portion 31 will have just the right dimensions to form a new top for the carton. Also, once the size of the box has been reduced by the height of section S or also section S, one carton, such as containing cereal, may be stacked upon another, depending upon the height of the shelf. Since the average kitchen shelf is at least 14 inches high, it will be possible to store two former 9 inch cartons one upon the other after section S has been removed from each.

Because the size of the carton may be reduced, it is possible for the user to easily and quickly observe the the approximate amount of cereal or other product left in the carton, so that an additional supply may be se cured when the carton reaches a level below perforations 21. Previous to the present invention, it was necessary for one to pick up the carton, open it, and look inside, before marketing, so that one could determine when an additional carton of the product should be purchased.

Finally, it will be evident that the present invention does not result in ay increase in the cost of manufacture of the carton since no additional material is required. It is merely necessary when making a new die or altering an old die, to provide means for forming tabs 23 and 24 and perforations 20, 21, 22, 27 and 28 and to form score lines 25 and 26. However, this is a simple matter and will not result in any appreciable increase in production cost, since the blanking, assembly and gluing operations are the same as for prior conventional cartons. As will be evident, the perforations 20, 21, 22, 27 and 28 and score lines 25 and 26 are readily formed during the blanking operation. The perforations need not extend completely through the wall of the carton, since a suflicient depth of the perforations to permit separation along the lines of the perforations is available. Thus, as used here- A as.

in, the term perforations includes partial as well as complete perforations.

From the foregoing, it will be apparent that a carton constructed in accordance with this invention fulfills to a marked degree the requirements and objects hereinbefore set forth. By providing a carton with removable sections S and S, the size of the box can be decreased by sequentially tearing the sections from the carton as the contents thereof are used. This is accomplished by merely pulling outwardly on a tab disposed at one edge of each section and tearing along the perforations across the side, front and opposite side, then up along the back. Then the back of the carton is folded along a score line, so that the upper portion thereof forms a new top for the carton and the outer flap slips inside the front of the box. Furthermore, once the cartons have been reduced in size, at least two cartons may be stacked one upon the other, thereby saving additional space on a shelf or other storage place. When a 9 inch carton is completely empty, it is only slightly more than half its original size, so that it will take up a lesser amount of space in a wastebasket. Also, the change in the size of the carton provides an indication of the level of the contents within the carton, so that an additional supply may be ordered when needed As will be evident, the principles of this invention may be applied to cartons of various sizes and adapted to contain various types of products or materials, as well as cartons having other types of tops and bottoms. Also, various other changes may be made, such as placing tabs 23 and 2 closer to back 11, providing a vertical row of perforations in flange 14 similar to perforations 22, and others. Thus, other embodiments of this invention may exist, without departing from the spirit and scope thereof.

What is claimed is:

1. A carton having a front, a back, a bottom interconnecting said front and said back, a first side interconnecting said front and said back, a second side integral with said front and sealed to a flange extending forwardly from the corresponding side edge of said back, and a top including a flap which folds forwardly from the upper edge of said back, the improvement which comprises a removable section including the uppermost portion of said front, said first side and said second side; a lateral row of perforations extending across said first side, said front and said second side at a distance spaced from said top corresponding to the height of said removable section; a vertical row of perforations at the intersection of said first side and said back extending from said lateral row of perforations to the top of said carton; a row of perforations across said flange, spaced from said top the same distance said lateral row of perforations is spaced from said top, so that said section may be removed from said carton along said lateral row of perforations and the upper portion of said flange torn along said row of perforations and folded against the upper portion of said back, which may be bent forwardly to form a new top for said carton and said flap slid behind the remainder of said front, inside said carton.

2. A carton as set forth in claim 1, in which said lateral row of perforations and said row of perforations on said flange are spaced from said top of said carton a distance equal to the width of said sides so that said upper portion of said back forms a new top extending to said front of said carton when said section is separated from said carton, and said upper flap extends down into said carton behind the remainder of said front.

3. A carton having a front, a back, a bottom interconnecting said front and said back, a first side interconnecting said front and said back, a second side integral with said front and sealed to a flange extending forwardly from the side edge of said back and a top having a lower flap which folds rearwardly from the upper edge of said front and an upper flap which folds forwardly from the upper edge of said back over a portion of said inner flap, the improvement comprising a first removable section including the uppermost portion of said front, said first and said second sides and said inner flap and adapted to be separated from said carton; and a second removable section below said first removable section and including a portion of said front and said first and said second sides and adapted to be separated from said carton, so that said first section may be removed when the contents of said carton are below said first section and said second section may be removed when said contents are below said second section, an uppermost portion of the back of said carton being adapted to form a top for said carton when said first section is removed and a next uppermost portion of the back of said carton being adapted to form a top for said carton when said second section is removed.

4. A carton as set forth in claim 3, including a first lateral row of perforations extending across said first side, said front and said second side, between said first section and said second section; and a second lateral row of perforations extending across said first side, said front, and said second side, between said second section and the remainder of said carton; and a vertical row of perforations at the intersection of said first side and said back, extending upwardly from the said second lateral row of perforations to said top, so that said first section and said second section may be torn from said carton when said contents are below said first and second lateral rows of perforations, respectively.

5. A carton as set forth in claim 4, including a tab of said first section extending rearwardly from said second side past the sealed portion of said second side and said flange, thereby providing means for separating said first section from the remainder of said carton; and a tab of said second section extending rearwardly from said second side past said sealed portion of said second side and said flange, thereby providing means for separating said second section from the remainder of said carton.

6. A carton as set forth in claim 5, in which a first score line extends laterally across said back and is spaced from said top the same distance as said first lateral row of perforations, so that the uppermost portion of said back may be folded forwardly along said score line to form a new top for said carton after said first section is removed; and a second score line extends laterally across said back and is spaced from said top the same distance as said second lateral row of perforations, so that the portion of said back between said first and second score lines may be folded forwardly along said second score line to form a new top for said carton after said second section is removed.

7. A carton as set forth in claim 6, including a first row of perforations across said flange, spaced from said top the same distance as said first lateral row of perforations, so that the uppermost portion of said flange may be separated along said first row of perforations and folded against said upper portion of said back when said upper portion is folded forwardly along said first score line to form said new top for said carton after said first section has been separated from said carton; and a second row of perforations across said flange, spaced from said top the same distance as said second lateral row of perforations, so that the portion of said flange between said first and second rows of perforations may be separated along said second row of perforations and folded against said portion of said back between said first and second score lines when said portion is folded forwardly along said second score line to form a new top for said carton, after said second section has been separated from the remainder of said carton.

8. A carton as set forth in claim 7, in which said first lateral row of perforations, said first row of perforations across said flange and said first score line are spaced from said top a distance equal to the width of said sides and said second lateral row of perforations, said second row of perforations across said flange and said second score line are spaced from said first row of perforations and said first score line a distance equal to the width of said sides.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,145,430 New Jan. 31, 1939 2,179,504 Hasbrook Nov. 14, 1939 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,183,269 France Jan. 26, 1959

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2145430 *Oct 23, 1936Jan 31, 1939Hugo NewContainer
US2179504 *May 28, 1936Nov 14, 1939Chicago Carton CoFood product package
FR1183269A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3302855 *Aug 18, 1964Feb 7, 1967Reynolds Metals CoReducible container construction and blanks therefor or the like
US4762233 *May 26, 1987Aug 9, 1988Sears Jack LContracting container
US5217164 *Nov 13, 1991Jun 8, 1993Carter-Wallace, Inc.Biodegradable product dispenser
US5251808 *Dec 29, 1992Oct 12, 1993Rudd Darryl JVariable volume box
US5484100 *Mar 24, 1995Jan 16, 1996Westvaco CorporationTapered, hexagonal paperboard carton
US6119929 *Mar 13, 1998Sep 19, 2000Rose; Harold J.Container having a plurality of selectable volumes
US6364199Aug 4, 2000Apr 2, 2002Harold J. RoseContainer having a plurality of selectable volumes
US6676009Aug 9, 2000Jan 13, 2004Harold J. RoseContainer having a plurality of selectable volumes
US9051076Aug 14, 2012Jun 9, 2015Leena AhsanContainer having a plurality of identified markings to reduce container volume during use
US9580200Jun 4, 2015Feb 28, 2017Leena AhsanContainer having a plurality of identified markings to reduce container volume during use and method of manufacturing same
EP0023411A1 *Jul 23, 1980Feb 4, 1981Kanebo Foods, Ltd.Size-reducible container
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/101.1, 229/101.2, 229/926
International ClassificationB65D5/54
Cooperative ClassificationY10S229/926, B65D5/542
European ClassificationB65D5/54B3