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Publication numberUS3128779 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 14, 1964
Filing dateMar 2, 1961
Priority dateDec 21, 1953
Publication numberUS 3128779 A, US 3128779A, US-A-3128779, US3128779 A, US3128779A
InventorsFrank E Morris
Original AssigneeFrank E Morris
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Line cleaning equipment
US 3128779 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 14; 1964 F. E. MORRIS 3,128,779

3 Sheets-Sheet 1 D II 46 44 38 49 /3 66' 67 .55 v 1/ 1/ 1 I/ V v v v 45 45 ,50 8 I \5/ 52 .53 63 FIG. I

FIG. 2

FRANK E. MORRIS INVENTOR.

April 14, 1964 F. E. MORRIS 3,128,779 LINE CLEANING EQUIPMENT Original Filed Dec. 21, 1953 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 FRANK E. MORRIS INVENTOR.

ATTOR F. E. MORRIS LINE CLEANING EQUIPMENT April 14, 1964 Original Filed Dec.

3 Sheets-Sheet 3 SUPPLY L/Nf J United States Patent Ofiflce 3,128,779 Patented Apr. 14., 1964 3,128,779 LINE (JLEANING EQUIPMENT Frank E. Morris, 4435 NE. Prescott St., Portland, Oreg. Original application Dec. 21, 1953, Ser. No. 399,492, new Patent No. 2,974,071, elated Mar. 7, 1961. Divided and this application Mar. 2, 1961, Ser. No. 92,895

7 Claims. (Cl. 134-107) My invention relates to providing improvements in line cleaning and freeing equipment for use in cleaning fuel oil supply, return and vent lines, plumbing waste lines and lines of all categories and uses which are subject to clogging by reason of the accumulation of residues formed from the intermingling of oil products, gasoline, Water or vapor or condensation within said lines which gradually create a sludge formation resulting in a blocking and restriction of said lines.

One object of my invention is to provide means for cleaning and freeing fuel oil supply, return and vent lines and plumbing waste lines which are ordinarily buried beneath earth, concrete or in other Ways inaccessible without the necessity of uncovering said lines or opening the fuel supply tank in the case of fuel supply, vent, or return lines.

Another object of my invention is to provide portable equipment that may be taken from location to location which is capable of cleaning and freeing more than one line at a time without the necessity of attaching the device to and removing it from each line as it is to be cleaned or to Work on another line of a fuel oil system.

A further object of my invention is to provide portable equipment and means for cleaning and freeing fuel oil supply, return and vent lines and plumbing waste lines in a relatively short period of time without the necessity of taking the fuel oil supply system or waste lines out of service for a long period of time.

This application is a division of my copending application for Line Cleaning Equipment and Process, Serial No. 399,492, filed December 21, 1953, now Patent No. 2,974,- 071, which was restricted to a Line Cleaning Process.

Referring to the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a side elevation of the pressure tank and oil and solvent heating receptacle with a portion of the side broken away, so as to show the steam heating coil there in. This view also shows three of the multiple heads in position, the air suction ejector attached for use, the air pressure line running into the upper multiple head, the fill pipe, temperature gauges, pressure gauges and operating valves, etc.

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the heating and pressure reservoir tank, showing three of the multiple heads in position, the pressure gauges, the air suction ejector in position, the automatic safety valve, and the operating valves of the multiple heads.

FIG. 3 is a plan view of a portion of the heating and pressure reservoir tank, showing the tandem arrangement of two of the multiple heads set up with the attaclnnent for shooting chemical into a fuel oil supply tank on one of the multiple head outlets and also the suction and return lines of a fuel supply system attached thereto, the reversible, variable speed pump and the second of the multiple heads showing parts of lines going to three separate sources of deposit for chemical, fuel oil and dissolved sludge withdrawn from the lines.

FIG. 4 is a side elevation view of an arrangement for connecting a typical steamer directly with a preheating device which is designed for insertion through the fill pipe into a fuel oil tank.

FIG. 5 is a sectional view of the tank preheating device taken in the direction of the arrows along the line 5-5 of FIG. 4, showing the generally spiral design of the end of said preheating device. The steam return pipe is not shown in this View.

FIG. 6 is a side elevational view of a portion of a fuel supply tank with part of said tank broken away, so as to reveal the suction line and foot valve on the end thereof and the return line of a fuel supply tank. This View also shows a vent line with a portion thereof broken away.

FIG. 7 is a side elevational View in section of a preheating and reheating receptacle showing the water jacket, the oil compartment, the steam heated coil within the oil compartment and a drain outlet for the oil compartment.

FIG. Sis a schematic or diagrammatic view showing the connection and relation of the pressure reservoir tank and manifolds shown in FIGS. 1 to 3 inclusive, the steamer and the tank pre-heater shown in FIG. 4, the supply tank shown in FIG. 6, the pro-heating and reheating receptacle shown in FIG. 7 and the vent, supply and return lines of a fuel oil heating system. The various gauges have been omitted from this figure for reasons of clarity.

Referring further to the drawings:

The reservoir pressure tank it) is equipped with a heat exchanging coil 11 whose inlet end 12 and outlet end 13 protrude from the end 14 of the said tank 10. A fill pipe 15 is located on the end 14 of the said tank 10 and is equipped with a cap 15. Legs 17 support the reservoir pressure tank iii, and a drain plug 18 is located on the bottom side of said tank between the legs 17. A temperature gauge 19 is connected to the end 20 of said tank 10. An inlet pipe 21 is situated in the center of the upper side of said tank 10 to which is coupled a short length of pipe 22. A conventional four-way plumbing cross 23 is threaded to the top of the pipe 22. A pressure gauge 24 is threaded to the top of the cross 23. Immediately adjacent to the cross 23 and on the left hand side thereof is coupled a screw type valve 25. A lever operated butterfly type valve 26 is then coupled to the valve 25 at the end thereof opposite the cross 23. A length of hose 2'7 is coupled to the butterfly type valve at the end thereof opposite the valve 25. Immediately adjacent to the cross 23, as shown in FIG. 1, is coupled a typical crosshead which is formed out of a conventional plumbing cross such as the cross 23. Immediately adjacent to the cross-head and on the right hand side thereof opposite the cross 23 is coupled a screw type valve 28. Immediately adjacent to this valve and opposite the end coupled to the typical plumbing cross is coupled a butterfly type valve 29. The other end of the butterfly type valve 29 is coupled to a length of hose 30 in which is situated a constant pressure inlet valve 31. The hose 30 is then attached to a source of compressed air. On one side of the typical cross-head 32 is coupled a safety valve 33. On the opposite end of the cross-head 32 from the valve 33 is coupled a screw type valve 34 to which in turn is coupled a butterfly type valve 35. A length of hose 36 is coupled to the opposite end of the valve 35, said length of hose 36 in turn being coupled to an air operated ejector 37. The end 37a of the air suction ejector deposits Withdrawn oil, dissolved sludge, etc. in a waste barrel not shown in the drawings. The leg 37b of the air suction ejector is coupled to a butterfly valve 38 and a screw type valve 39 which is coupled to one outlet of a typical crosshead 40. The opposite end of the four-way cross-head 40 is coupled to another screw type valve 41 which in turn is coupled to a butterfly type 42, the valve 42 being then coupled to a supply line, a return line or a vent line, as the. user may decide. In the center of the cross-head. 40 and on the top thereof is located'a pressure gauge 43 on the left hand side of the cross-head 40, as shown in FIG. 2 of the drawings, a screw type valve 44 is coupled. In turn a butterfly type valve 45 is coupled to the screw type valve 44. A standard plumbing T 46 is then coupled to the butterfly type valve 45. The outlet 47 on the leg of the T 46 at the operators option is coupled to a suction line, return line or vent line. On the right hand side of the cross-head 40 as shown in FIG. 2 of the drawings a screw type valve 48 is attached, to which in turn a butterfly type valve 49 is then attached, the valve 49 then being coupled to an outlet pipe 50 on the end 20 of the reservoir pressure and heating tank 10. The outlet 50 on the end 20 and the outlet 51 on the end 14 of the said tank are located at the lowermost point of the diameter of said pressure and heating tank 10. A butterfly type valve 52 is coupled to the outlet pipe 51 on the end 14 of the reservoir pressure and heating tank 10. A screw type valve 53 is then coupled to the butterfly type valve 52. A typical plumbing cross-head 54 is coupled to the valve 53; a pressure gauge 55 is screwed into the middle of the cross-head 54. On the opposite side of the crosshead 54 is coupled a screw type valve 56 to which is coupled a butterfly type valve 57. A conventional plumbing T 58 is then coupled to the valve 57; leg 59 of the T 58 may be attached to a suction line, a return line or a vent line at the operators option. To another side of the cross-head 54 is coupled a screw type valve 60 which is coupled to a butterfly type valve 61 which is coupled to a vent, suction, or return line at the operators option. On the opposite side of the cross-head 54 is coupled a screw type valve 62 which in turn is coupled to a butterfly type valve 63. The valve 63 is then coupled to a waste line, a return line, a vent line or a suction line at the operators option. As shown in FIG. 3 of the drawings, a variable delivery reversible pump 64 is coupled to the T 58. To the reversible pump 64 on the side opposite the T 58 is coupled a standard cross-head 65. The remaining three outlets of the cross-head 65 are equipped with a typical screw valve and butterfly valve combination such as has been described in connection with cross-heads aforementioned in this specification. These outlets from the cross-heads 65 enable the operator at his option to withdraw hot oil and chemical and sludge from the line being cleaned and deposit it in a waste barrel, the preheating and reheating device, or the reservoir pressure and heating tank 10.

The combination of a cross-head coupled to a lower outlet of the pressure and heating tank 10, said cross-head being attached to a return line, a suction line and a vent line or a chemical spraying device 66 with a variable delivery reversible pump between said cross-head and an outer cross-head whose three outlets run to various places of deposit for the hot oil and chemical and sludge withdrawn from the lines is intended to be used on either end of the reservoir, pressure and heating tank 10. Hence said tank 10 may be equipped at either end or both ends simultaneously with a tandem cross-head set-up with a reversible variable delivery pump between said cross-heads. By means of the said reversible pump 64 the operator is also enabled to withdraw deposited chemical and oil from one of the places in which it has been deposited and run it back through the same or a different line from which it was withdrawn. Thus by means of the reversible pump 64 and the pressure gauges 55 the operator is enabled through his pressure readings to tell when he has hit a plug in a line and then to back the hot chemical and oils up by means of said pump 64 causing it to be deposited in one of the receptacles serviced by the cross-head 65. He can again reverse the pump 64 forcing the hot oil and chemical against the plugged spot in said line from which it was withdrawn, creating a ramming effect. By alternating the pumping direction as above described, the chemical and oil solution tends to have a wiping or scouring effect on the lines to be freed. If the operator so desires, in the use of the air ejector 37, a positively maintained predetermined pressure or suction can be attained in the withdrawing phase by setting the constant pressure valve 31 at the pressure reading desired. The air ejector 37 is useful only for the purpose of backing up or withdrawing the oil and chemical solution from the line or lines being freed. Thus, if it has been determined the lines are old or too weak to stand with safety more than a given amount of suction or pressure, that pressure may be established by means of the valve 31 or by controlling the speed or delivery of the pump 64, so that the operation can be carried out without the operator having to worry about rupturing, collapsing, or damaging lines.

A tank spraying device 66 for shooting the inside of a fuel storage tank at various levels with a hot chemical cleaning and desludging solution is provided at its end 67, which is generally circular in shape, with a plurality of holes 63 in the circular portion thereof. The terminology shooting the inside of a fuel storage tank as used in this specification is employed in the sense of disbursing hot oil, hot chemical and/or hot oil and chemical through and upon the interior of the fuel storage and supply tank. By coupling the tank spraying device 66 to one of the three outlets on one of the inner cross-heads, such as crosshead 54, by means of a hose 69, the inside of a fuel tank can be shot at various levels with the hot chemical desludglng solution at a predetermined pressure which is controlled by the setting on the constant pressure inlet valve 31. The tank spraying device 66 may be inserted through the fill pipe or the manhole opening of the fuel tank.

A portable steamer 70 of any standard make or design, such as is shown in FIG. 4, is connected by means of a hose 71 to the inlet end 12 of the heat exchanger coil 11 in the reservoir, pressure and heating tank 10. The steamer 70 provides and generates the necessary heat which is transferred through the heat exchanger coil 11 to the hot chemical and oil solution in the reservoir pressure and heating tank 10. When the desired temperature, as shown by the temperature gauge 19 on the end 20 of the reservoir pressure and heating tank 10, has been obtained, the line gauge 31 is set at a predetermined pressure, and compressed air is introduced through the hose 30, the valve 29, the valve 28, the cross-head 32, the vertical cross 23, the pipe 22 and the inlet opening 21 into the reservoir pressure and heating tank 10. The operator by opening and closing the proper valves is ready to start freeing one of the lines connected to an outlet of an inner cross-head. As soon as the first line has been freed, which will be indicated by the change in pressure registered on the pressure gauges 43 or 55, the operator is then immediately able to work on another line by merely opening and closing the proper valves on the crosshead to make the desired outlet accessible to the hot chemical and oil solution in the reservoir, pressure and heating tank 10. Thus after the equipment has been set up and attached to the lines, which are in need of cleaning and freeing, the operator can carry on the whole operation by merely changing the openings on valves and without the necessity of any further couplings or uncouplings until the job has been completed.

A tank preheater 72, as shown in FIG. 4, is coupled in one arrangement by lengths of hose 71 and directly to the steamer 70 and then inserted through the manhole of the fuel oil supply tank or indirectly in combination with other equipment, as shown in FIG. 8. The end 73 of the tank preheater 72 is generally spiral in design for the purpose of obtaining a greater heating area within the fuel supply tank. The spiral 73 emerges into the return pipe 74 of the tank preheater 72. The return pipe 74 is coupled directly by means of said hose 75, or indirectly through hoses 71a, 71b and 75, to the return connection of the steamer 70. The whole tank preheater 72 is constructed preferably of copper tubing.

A portion of a typical fuel oil supply tank 76 with a part thereof broken away is shown in FIG. 6. A suction line 77 with a foot valve 78 at the bottom thereof is shown in place in the tank 76. Also, a return line 79 and vent line 86 are shown in place on the tank 76.

Oftentimes the source of trouble in a blocked fuel oil supply system resides in the foot valve 78 which becomes lodged open by means of sludge formations or particles of carbon. By attaching the end of the suction line 77, which fastens to the burner of the heating unit, to one of the outlets on one of the inner cross-heads of the tandem cross-head set-up, such as the cross-head 54, pressure and hot oil and chemical solution may be applied to the line and rammed back and forth, as described above, until the line has been completely freed and scoured out, including the foot valve 78. This is accomplished without the necessity of entering, opening or excavating the fuel oil supply tank or of excavating or uncovering the suction line, return line or vent line of the heating system, as the case may be.

A typical vent line 80 has three 90 elbows 81, 32 and 83 inserted in such a manner as to allow for the settling of the fuel oil tank 76 into any direction without breaking the vent line 80. Oftentimes when a tank settles the resulting angles created by the shifting of the vent line through the 90 elbows 81, 82 and 83 creates a low section in the vent line which becomes blocked by fuel oil when the tank is filled to the capacity it is supposed to hold. This results eventually in a sludge formation and a blocking of the vent line 80 so that the tank 76 is unable to breathe properly, resulting in the burner unit not functioning as it should. The vent line 3i) may also be coupled to one of the outlets of one of the inner crossheads such as cross-head 4% and freed in the same manner as a suction line or return line without the necessity of excavating said vent line 80.

The same process using the reservoir pressure tank It the air pressure line 3d, constant pressure inlet valve 31, inlet pipe 21, typical inner cross-heads 40 or 53, variable delivery pump 64, the air suction ejector 37, etc., may be employed to free plumbing waste lines which have become clogged from accumulation of coagulated grease and sludge without the necessity of expensive repairs, replacements or disassembly.

An oil and chemical preheater and reheater 84 can be used in connection with my device through the medium of one of the outlets of one of the outer cross-heads 65. Said preheater and reheater 84 has an outer jacket 8 5a and an inner jacket 85, the inner jacket 85 forming a container 86 for receiving oil and chemical solution. Said inner jacket 85 is concentrically located within the outer jacket 84, forming a water containing space 87 around all sides and the bottom of said inner jacket 85. A heat exchanger coil 88 is positioned within said space 86 of said inner jacket 85. Said heat exchanger coil 88 is provided with an inlet connection 89 and an outlet connection 90, said ends 89 and 90 being fastened to a source of heat such as the steamer 70. A drain plug 91 is positioned at the lower portion of the inner jacket 85 so that the oil and chemical solution may be drained out of the space 86 without disturbing the water in the space 87.

By means of a hose from one of the outlets of a typical outer cross-head 65, the preheated oil and chemical solution within the space 86 may be pumped into the particular line being cleaned by means of the reversible variable delivery pump 64, or the oil and chemical solution may be withdrawn from the line being freed and redeposited in the space 86 of the preheater and reheater receptacle for reheating said oil and chemical before ramming it back into the line to be freed. This operation is carried out entirely through the medium of the reversible variable delivery pump 64.

The preheater and reheater receptacle is provided with the water space 87, in addition to the heat exchanger coil 88, so that the preheater and reheater receptacle may be set directly on an open flame, if desired, to speed up the process of preheating or reheating the oil and chemical solution within the space 86. The preheater and reheater also serves as an auxiliary supply source for oil and chemical solution which is available in the event the lines being cleaned are so long that more solution is required than can be held in the reservoir pressure and heating tank 10, or in the event that it is more convenient to draw oil and chemical from this source in connection with the operation of the reversible variable delivery pump in cleaning lines or in shooting a fuel storage tank.

As shown in the drawings, my device is equipped with a screw type valve and a butterfly valve, coupled together in series wherever used to control an outlet or inlet opening of my device. This arrangement has been embodied in my device so that the operator will have a valve available for rapidly shutting off or opening an outlet or inlet by means of the butterfly type valve, and will also have available a slower operating but more positively locking screw type valve. It is understood that the arrangement as shown in the drawings is the preferable embodiment of the invention, but that I am not limiting myself to this particular embodiment. It is further understood that in the use and operation of my equipment I first place the oil selected for the particular cleaning operation or the said oil in combination wtih the desludging chemical in the reservoir pressure and heating tank 10 and, if a greater quantity of oil and/ or chemical and oil solution is required, such additional supply is placed in the space 86 of the pre-heating and reheating receptacle shown in FIG. 7 of the drawings, which receptacle is a combination preheater, reheater and auxiliary heater and auxiliary supply reservoir for oil or oil and chemical solution.

It is also understood that in connection with the operation of the reversible variable delivery pump 64 hot oil, chemicals and dissolved sludge may be returned to the reservoir pressure and heating tank 10, the auxiliary heater and supply reservoir receptacle combination device shown in FIG. 7 of the drawings, or a waste barrel, selectively, or that said oil, chemical and/or dissolved sludge may be deposited in a waste barrel by means of the air ejector 37, 37a, 37b.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:

1. In line cleaning equipment: a reservoir pressure and heating tank provided with a fill pipe and drain plug; a heat exchanger coil within said tank; a source of heat connected to said heat exchanger coil; an inlet cross-head; a pressure inlet; an automatic safety pressure release valve and a constant pressure inlet valve fastened to said pressure reservoir and heating tank through said inlet crosshead; a source of compresesd air connected to said constant pressure inlet valve; a temperature gauge connected to said reservoir pressure and heating tank; outlet con nections at the lower ends of said reservoir pressure and heating tank; an inner cross-head, having multiple outlets connected to each of said lower outlets of said reservoir pressure and heating tank; a pressure gauge attached to each of said inner cross-heads; an outer crosshead, having multiple outlets; variable delivery, reversible pumps connecting said inner cross-heads to said outer cross-heads; valves controlling each outlet of said reservoir pressure and heating tank; valves controlling each outlet of each of said cross-heads; an oil and chemical preheater and reheater connected to one of the outlets of said outer cross-heads; and an oil ejector operable through one of the outlets of said inlet cross-head.

2. In line cleaning equipment; a reservoir pressure and heating tank provided with a fill pipe, a drain plug and a pressure inlet opening; a heat exchanger Within said reservoir pressure and heating tank; a source of heat connected to said heat exchanger; a vertical cross connected to the pressure inlet opening of said reservoir pressure and heating tank; an inlet cross-head on one side of said vertical cross; valvular control fastened to another side of said vertical cross and a pressure gauge on the fourth side of said vertical cross; said inlet cross-head being fastened to said vertical cross on one side; an automatic safety pressure valve attached to another side of said inlet crosshead; valvular control fastened to the inlet side and also valvular control on the remaining outlet side of said inlet cross-head; a source of compressed air attached to said valvular control on the inlet side of said inlet cross-head; a constant pressure inlet valve positioned between said valvular control on the inlet side of said inlet cross-head and said source of compressed air; a temperature gauge fastened to said reservoir pressure and heating tank; an outlet positioned at the lower portion of said reservoir pressure and heating tank; a valvular control fastened to said outlet; an inner cross-head fastened to said valvular control; a pressure gauge afiixed to said inner cross-head; a valvular control attached to each of the outlets of said inner cross-head; a T fastened to said valvular control of said cross-head, opposite the valvular control from the outlet of said reservoir pressure and heating tank; a valvular control fastened to the leg outlet of said T; a reversible variable delivery pump fastened to said T on the side opposite to the inner cross-head; an outer cross-head fastened to said reversible variable delivery pump on the side opposite to the said inner cross-head; valvular controls on each of the outlets of said outer cross-head; an air ejector fastened to the valvular control of an outlet of the inlet cross-head; a hose from the valvular control of one of the outlets of said outer cross-head; and an auxiliary heater connected to said hose, said auxiliary heater being also an auxiliary supply receptacle.

3. In line cleaning equipment: a reservoir pressure and heating tank provided with a fill pipe, a drain plug and a pressure inlet opening; a heat exchanger within said reservoir pressure and heating tank; a source of heat connected to said heat exchanger, a vertical cross connected to the pressure inlet opening of said reservoir pressure and heating tank; an inlet cross-head on one side of said vertical cross; valvular control fastened to another side of said vertical cross and a pressure gauge on the fourth side of said vertical cross; said inlet cross-head being fastened to said vertical cross on one side; an automatic safety pressure valve attached to another side of said inlet crosshead; valvular control fastened to the inlet side and also valvular control on the remaining outlet side of said inlet cross-head; a source of compressed air attached to said valvular control on the inlet side of said inlet cross-head; a constant pressure inlet valve positioned between said valvular control on the inlet side of said inlet cross-head and said source of compressed air; a temperature gauge fastened to said reservoir pressure and heating tank; an outlet positioned at the lower portion of said reservoir pressure and heating tank; a valvular control fastened to said outlet; an inner cross-head fastened to said valvular control; a pressure gauge affixed to said inner cross-head; a valvular control attached to each of the outlets of said inner cross-head; a T fastened to said valvular control of said cross-head, opposite the valvular control from the outlet of said reservoir pressure and heating tank; a valvular control fastened to the leg outlet of said T; a reversible variable delivery pump fastened to said T on the side opposite to the inner cross-head; an outer cross-head fastened to said reversible variable delivery pump on the side opposite to the said inner cross-head; valvular controls on each of the outlets of said outer cross-head; an air ejector fastened to the valvular control of an outlet of the inlet cross-head, or, selectively, to the valvular control of the said vertical cross and to the valvular control of an outlet of said inner cross-head; a hose from the valvular control of one of the outlets of said outer cross-head; an auxiliary heater connected to said hose, said auxiliary heater being also an auxiliary supply receptacle; a tank shooting device, having a circular end with a plurality of holes in said end connecting to a central hole concentric of the configuration of said tank shooting device; a hose fastened to said tank shooting device on one end and to the valvular control of one of the outlets of said inner cross-head on the other end; and a fuel oil supply tank preheater having a spiralled end and attachments for fastening to said source of heat.

4. In equipment for cleaning sludge from lines of heating apparatus and other lines in which sludge accumulates in which any of the known desludging chemicals and/or hot oils, selectively, are used: a reservoir pressure and heating tank; a heat exchanger connected to a source of heat and positioned within said reservoir pressure and heating tank; valvular outlet from said reservoir pressure and heating tank; an inner cross-head, connected to said valvular outlet, said inner cross-head having multiple outlets with valvular controls on said outlets; an inlet to said reservoir pressure and heating tank; a source of pressure connected to said inlet, said inlet having a valvular control; a supply line and a return line of a fuel oil heating apparatus connected, respectively, to two of said outlets of said inner cross-head; and an air type ejector connected to said source of pressure and to the remaining outlet of said inner cross-head.

5. In equipment for cleaning sludge from lines of heating apparatus and other lines in which sludge accumulates: an outer cross-head, having multiple outlets each with valvular control means; a reversible variable delivery pump connected to the valvular means of one of said outlets of said outer cross-head; an inner cross-head with multiple outlets each with valvular control means connecting by one of its said valvular controlled outlets to said reversible variable delivery pump on the side thereof opposite from said outer cross-head and connectable by another outlet of said inner cross-head to the supply line of a fuel oil heating system, by a third outlet to the return line and by the remaining outlet to an outlet of a reservoir pressure and heating tank, said reversible variable delivery pump alternately moving the desludging agents into and withdrawing the said agents from one end of said supply line, return line and reservoir pressure and heating tank; an auxiliary heater and supply receptacle; a waste receptacle; a third receptacle; the remaining valvular controlled outlets of said outer cross-head being connected with said auxiliary heater and supply receptacle, said waste receptacle, and said third receptacle.

6. In line cleaning equipment: a reservoir pressure and heating tank having an outlet; a heat exchanger positioned within said reservoir pressure and heating tank; an inner cross-head with multiple valvularly controlled outlets connected to the outlet of said reservoir pressure and heating tank; a reversible variable delivery pump connected to an outlet of said inner cross-head; an outer cross-head with multiple valvularly controlled outlets connected to said reversible variable delivery pump; a pre-heating and reheating device connected to an outlet of said outer crosshead; a source of heat connected to said reservoir pressure and heating tank and to said pre-heating and reheating device; and the remaining outlets of said inner and outer cross-heads being connected to a supply line, a return line and a vent line of a pipe system and to a waste receptacle, thereby permitting alternate introduction of a cleaning agent into, and its withdrawal from, said lines and its deposit in said receptacle by the operation of said reversible variable delivery pump.

7. In line cleaning equipment: a reservoir pressure and heating tank having an outlet; a source of pressure connected to said reservoir pressure and heating tank; an inner cross-head with multiple valvularly controlled outlets connected to the outlet of said reservoir pressure and heating tank; a pump connected to an outlet of said inner crosshead; an outer cross-head with multiple valvularly controlled outlets connected to said pump; a pro-heating and reheating device connected to an outlet of said outer cross-head; a source of heat connected to said reservoir pressure and heating tank and to said pre-heating and reheating device; and the remaining outlets of said inner and outer cross-heads being connectible to a supply line, a return line and a vent line of a pipe system and to a waste receptacle, thereby permitting alternate introduction of a cleaning agent into, and its withdrawal from, said lines and receptacle.

(References on following page) References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Miller Sept. 12, 1916 Lape Aug. 13, 1935 Powell Nov. 19, 1940 10 Keller Jan. 4, 1944 Jaffa May 25, 1948 Alderman Nov. 23, 1948 Abbott Dec. 11. 1951 Slover July 14, 1959

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5964230 *Oct 6, 1997Oct 12, 1999Air Products And Chemicals, Inc.For cleaning the interior of a process chemical distribution system
US6138691 *May 25, 1999Oct 31, 2000Air Products And Chemicals, Inc.Solvent purge mechanism
US6745782Feb 11, 2002Jun 8, 2004C.H.O.C.S., Inc.An oxygen line cleaning device for supplying oxygen uses silicated alkaline cleaner
US7111668 *May 27, 2004Sep 26, 2006Rittal Gmbh & Co. KgCooling arrangement for an offshore wind energy installation
WO1994003286A1 *Aug 4, 1993Feb 17, 1994Precision Dispensing Systems LImprovements in washing systems
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/107, 134/113, 134/169.00R, 134/21
International ClassificationB08B9/032, B08B9/02, F23K5/18
Cooperative ClassificationF23K5/18, B08B9/0328, B08B9/0325
European ClassificationB08B9/032B12, F23K5/18, B08B9/032B6