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Publication numberUS3129307 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 14, 1964
Filing dateApr 12, 1961
Priority dateApr 13, 1960
Publication numberUS 3129307 A, US 3129307A, US-A-3129307, US3129307 A, US3129307A
InventorsDe Vargas Jose Munoz
Original AssigneeDe Vargas Jose Munoz
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device for accelerating the disconnection of electric switches and for extinguishing their arc
US 3129307 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

SWITCHES AND EXTINGUISHING THEI R" Filed April 12, 1961 D 14, 1964 Mufi'oz DE VARGAS 3,1 307 DEVICE FOR AC ERAT THE DISCONNECTION ELECTRI 3 ets-Sheet l i i 5 I E g i 76 4 xi I [or B fim'lhu/ [19%4/ Attorney pr 14, 1954 J. MUNOZ DE VARGAS 7 DEVICE FOR ACCELERATING THE DISCONNECTION OF ELECTRIC SWITCHES AND FOR EXTINGUISHING THEIR ARC Filed April 12. 1961 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Inventor W1: fiwm pl i By MMMLJMW Attorney J. MuNoz DE VARGAS 3,129,307 DEVICE FOR ACCELERATING THE DISCONNECTION OF ELECTRIC A ril 14, 1964 SWITCHES AND FOR EXTINGUISHING THEIR ARC Filed April 12, 1961 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 lnventpr 2m: 0Q 07 y fiwm/ 1 14.,

Attorney United States Patent DEVICE FQR ACCELERATENG THE DISCONNEC- TEQN 0F ELECTRNI SWITCHES AND FOR EX- TENGUESHING THEIR ARC Jose Munoz de Vargas, Calle San Pablo 1, Seville, Spain Filed Apr. 12, 1961, Ser. No. 102,418 Ciaims priority, application Spain Apr. 13, 1960 ltl Claims. (Cl. Nil-144) This invention relates to electric switches and, in particular, to a process by which extremely high connectionspeeds are obtained therein, this high speed, combined with a tight seal produced in accordance with the invention, enabling the formation of the arc to be prevented, because there is insufiicient space for the arc to form, it being of advantage to install the system of contacts in an enclosed chamber, filled with inert dry gas, thus ensuring that rust does not form on the contacts and that the internal insulation of the apparatus does not suffer deterioration as a result of damp.

Circuit-breakers have to perform the maximum of work when they disconnect by a short circuit. The limit of the operating-capacity of a switch is its rupturing power, which depends on the characteristics of the current, on the disconnection-speed, on the area and shape of the contacts and on the medium in which the break takes place (air, oil, a magnetic field, etc.).

Consequently, the present switches for high currents have contacts which are either very large or subjected to very high surface-pressures. In both cases the apparatus has to be very robust in its construction, and this necessitates a great deal of energy for overcoming the eliects of inertia and obtaining high speeds, so that more economical and more rapid operating-systems, such as the electro-magnets of lower carrying-capacity, cannot be employed.

It follows that with any switch, whether operating in air, in oil, in a magnetic field, etc., the rapid separation of the contacts produces, for a few moments, a certain gap between their surfaces, and since this partial vacuum is conductive, the current tends to flow across it, rendering it incandescent, by virtue of the joule effect, or in other words, striking an arc. If We endeavour to reduce the area of the contacts, in order to reduce this vacuum zone, we shall increase the current-density, and this in turn again favours the formation of the arc. In order to obviate this drawback the idea was conceived of conveying a jet of air or oil onto the separated contacts, to extinguish the are by a mechanical elfect, but the extinguishing-jet cannot act until the contacts have started to move apart, that is to say, until the arc has already been produced.

It sometimes happens that the intensity of the current flowing during the first phase of the disconnection is very high, almost equivalent to a short circuit, whereupon the heat produced by the said arc is such as to result in almost instantaneous gasification of part of the oil, the consequence being an explosion. Furthermore, the high temperature of the arc produces granulations which prevent faultless contact and cause dangerous temperature-rises.

For these reasons, the said mechanisms have to be inspected and examined after each operation, whenever a short circuit has occurred. The inconvenience of such proceedings in an electrical plant are fully obvious.

The purpose of the invention is to remove these drawbacks from the known systems.

The invention provides for a process consisting of increasing the disconnection-speed of electric switches to a considerable extent (an object which can be achieved by reducing the Weight of the moving parts to a minimum) and of automatically interposing between the contacts an incombustible solid insulating body, all of which enables the creation of the arc to be prevented, because when the said insulating body is interposed at a very high speed a tight seal is thereby provided between the two contacts, preventing any current from passing and therefore preventing the are from forming.

The operation of a switch in which this process is applied will be in a sense similar to that of the piston of an explosion-engine. When this piston is rapidly displaced, a practically tight seal is produced between the explosion-chamber and the crankcase, preventing the combustion-gases from reaching the latter. In our case, what is prevented by the piston with its auxiliary organs is the possibility of the are passing from one contact to another.

In one constructional version of a device for the application of this process, the contacts of the switch are situated, diametrically opposite to each other, in an insulating-cylinder, and the circuit is closed by means of a number of rings or segments of a material which is a good conductor of electricity, which said devices break the circuit when they are displaced, while their place is occupied by an insulating body, such as asbestos, which, owing to the high speed of movement and the pressure exerted by the packing of asbestos against the walls of the cylinder, produces between the contacts a tight seal which prevents the current from flowing.

In this construction, the disconnecting-mechanismis operated by a spring which is locked or released by a pawl.

This basic construction has a number of draw-backs: the fact that the contacts are situated diametrically opposite each other means that the cylinders for high working voltages have to be given large diameters, and this results in considerable friction.

Consequently, in a design which now appears desirable, the contacts of the switch consist of concentric tubular parts, the diameter and thickness of the tubes depending solely on the cross section required for the passage of the current, the friction thus being reduced to such an extent thatthe system can be operated by low current electron-magnets instead of by springs.

This innovation incorporated into the preferred constructional version of the invention is so revolutionary that it enables extremely high. connectionand breakspeeds to be obtained, since its operation is practically instantaneous. Besides eliminating the drawbacks of the pawl, in certain cases, or of the compressed air, in other, it is a far more economical and eflicient process than all those at present in use.

The adoption of concentric tubular contacts enables the apparatus to be very inexpensively constructed and facilitates the tight sealing of the contact-chamber, once it is filled with an inert and dry gas.

This makes it possible to use contacts of copper instead of contacts made of costly stainless alloys and also to give the insulators smaller dimensions, when there is no humidity.

The fundamental difference between the process which we are about to describe and other patents based on the interposition of insulating bodies between the contacts from the moment of disconnection onwards is that our process ensures a tight seal which physically prevents the passage of the current, and this seal is obtained by the pressure exerted against the walls of the contact-chamber by an electrically insulating incombustible elastic system, such as a cord of asbestos or plastic suitable for interposition between the current-input and current-output contacts, the body of asbestos or similar substance occupying the space which was occupied by the movable contact, the tight seal produced by the asbestos of similar e) substance preventing the arc irom forming between the inputand output-contacts.

The attached drawings illustrate two constructional versions of electric switches intended for the practical application of the process to'whioh the invention'relates, and a detailed description of these switches will be given in conjuction' with the said drawings. In these latter- FIG. 1 is a sectional elevation, for thefir'st constructional version of thejinvention, of the cylinder forming the body of the switch;

FIG, 11; is ahorizontal sectional drawingrcorresponding to FIG. 1;

FIG. 2 represents the piston accommodated inside the cylinder, this being a vertical sectional elevation;

FIG. 2a is a horizontal sectional drawing corresponda F G- FIG. 3 is a sectional elevation of the complete switch in the closed-circuit position;

FIG.. 4 is a sectional elevation corresponding to FIG. 3 and showing the start of the disconnection movement;

FIG. 5 is a similar diagram of'the switchafter complete disconnection;

FIG. 6 is a similar diag am of the final phase of the disconnection;

FIG. 7, which relates to the second constructional 'version of the invention, is a sectional clevational representing the cylinder, with its piston and, bellows, and the connecting-rod and lever with the electroamagnets for the operation of the device, in the connected position;

'FIG. 8 is a partial sectional elevation corresponding to FIG. 7, and represents the upper part of the cylinder and piston at the start of the disconnection; 4

FIG. '9 is ascction or the cylinder "andth'e' piston, along the line 99 of FIG. 8;

FI G..-10.'is a sectionalfelevation representing, the cylinder and the piston in the disconnected position.

With reference to the drawings, and referring for the moment to FIGS. 1-6, it will be noted. that the switch or phase. of a switch shown therein consists of a tube 1 of a hard, highly insulant and incornbustible material, such. as the synthcticresinknohvn. as, araldite, and that the four parts 2., 2', of a "material which is a good conductor of electricity, such as copper, are rigidly embedded 'in the said tube. Each of these parts 2 is connected to the conne'c'ting terminals 3 and 4, the first one being the cur-, rent-input connection-terminal and the other, 4, on the same side, being the current-output terminal. The parts 2 on the opposite side are electrically bridged by the part 5, which must obviously be -a good conductor of electricity likewise. The-internal surface of the tube 1, with the four embeddedparts 2, forms a smooth assembly without projecting parts or edges, like the cylinder of an explosion-motor.

With reference to 'FIG. 2, this shows the construction of the piston 6, of the same material as the tube 1, twosegments 7 and 7' of elastic and conductive material, such as hardened copper, being movabl y accommodated in the said piston and functioning similar to the pistonsegrnents of an explosion-engine, that is to say,- being vigorously pressed against the internal walls of the cylin-. der 1. These segments 7, 7, have a recess 21 to ensure better contact between the segments; and theparts 2, very ample contact-surfaces thus being obtainable. Between the diameter of the piston 6 and that of the tube 1' there is just that slight gap required to enable the piston to move freely inside the tube. In addition to the aforesaid segments, packings or segments S ot a highly insulant and incombustible materialsuchas asbestos or suitable synthetic resin are accommodated in the same manner in the piston 6 and fit firmly against the internal surface of the tube 1, forming the most complete seal possible. The piston 6 extends atthe bottom in the form of a tube 9, at the top of which there is an orifice 10 to enable a helicoidal spring 111 (see FIG; 3) to engage in it. To the top of the piston 6 is affixed an operatingrod 12 with a projection 13 to accommodate a pawl.

Let us now place the piston 6 inside the tube 1, as may be seen from FIG. 3. Let us engage one end of a spring 11 in the orifice 10 of the piston 6 and the other end in the lower part 14 of the tube 1. This spring tends to displace piston 6 violently in a downward direction, an action which is prevented by the pawl 15 when the latter engages theprojection 13. Inside the tube 1 there is also a second piston 15, similar to the piston 6, and also having conductive segments 17-, 17' but without a packing. This piston 16 is caused to move upwards by the spring 18, 19 being a stop of which the purpose is to limit the travel of the piston 16.

Let us now examine the operation of the switch: in FIG. 3 it is shown in the connected position. The current enters through the terminal 3, passes to the part 2 and thence through the segments 7 and '7 to the opposite part2, which in turn transmits it through 5 to 2'. The current passes via, the segments 17 and 17' to the opposite part 2" and thence to the output-terminal 4.

If we now release the pawl 15, as shown in FIG. 4, the spring 11 causes the piston 6 to travel freely downwards with a violcnt movement, until the bottom end of thevtube 9 reaches the head of the piston 16 this position being shown in FIG. 4. The current has been interrupted between the mutually opposite parts 2 on the displacement of the. segments 7 and. '7' by which they were connected. In an ordinary switch the arc would have beenstruck between the lower ends of the parts 2 and the upper part of the segment 7. However, for an arc to form, current must fiow and a space favourable to the etc must exist, but the packing or insulating-segments 8. have been. interposed at a high speed and with a tight seal effect between the parts 2 and 7, the zone in which the arc could be struck, thus eliminating the tendency of the current to continue flowing between the contacts whichare. moving apart, since the material interposed is highly. insulant and forms a tight seal against the walls of the tube 1, thus preventing any possibility of the flow of current and thus of the formation of the arc. In its 'rapiddescent, the piston 6, after the circuit has been broken, reaches the piston 16, as we may see from FIG. 4. At this moment it encounters piston 16 and pulls it downwards, until the position shown in FIG. 5 is reached, since the force of the spring 11, added to the energy of .the part .6 in movement, is greater than the opposing force of the spring 18. The pawl 20 then automatically engages, fixing the piston 16 in the position shown in FIG. 5, which represents the switch in the disconnected position. The current is interrupted both by the displacement of the segments 7 and '7 and 'by that of the segments 17-and 17'.

In order to re-connect, we move the piston6 upwards by means of the rod 12, until the pawl 15 is engaged, as shown in FIG. 6. It should be noted that since the piston 16 is-1 etained by the pawl 20 the circuit remains open, so that this first phase of the connection is effected without current. In order to close it, the pawl 2% must bereleased. The action of the spring 18 will then cause the piston. 16 to move rapidly upwards until it reaches the stops 19, thus closing the circuit when the segments 17 and 17'-come in contact with the parts 2.

This first constructional version of the invention thus provides a switch with an extremely quick break, by reducing thetorces of inertia to a minimum, since the only part in motion is the piston 6 with its free connection-rod 12,-of a light-weight material; the connection is as rapid as the break.

Let us;now examine what occurs in the event of disconnection by a short circuit. When reconnection is desired-in-a'circuit-breakerand the short circuit continues, the contactor-element performing a rapid connectionmovement, which may, for example, be in an upward direction, has to change its direction of movementsuddenly, the circumstances thus being analogous to those which arise with a connecting rod and crank mechanism. The forces of inertia oppose the change of direction of movement, causing an inevitable delay in the disconnection. This very serious drawback, which doubles the time required for the connection and which so greatly influences the short-circuit effects, does not prevail with the switch to which this patent relates. As will be seen from FIG. 6, the piston 6 is connected, and at rest, when the piston 16 is moved to the connecting-position. As soon as this occurs, the overload-relay acts on the pawl 15 and trips it, without any change of movement, because it is in its position of rest, and without any obstacle in its disconnection-travel, until after the disconnection has taken place.

The piston, in its dual function of contactor and insulating and sealing element, must have the physical characteristics required to enable it to stand up to the task demanded of the switch of which it forms a part; in other words, its dimensions, the quality of the materials of which it is made, and the number of its segments, both the conductive ones and the insulant ones, will depend on the current-characteristics and the rupturing-capacity required. No further explanatory remarks are required in this connection, the subject being known to electrical engineers.

The main advantages of this new switch are therefore as follows:

It does not necessitate any apparatus for the production of compressed air, or larger or smaller volumes of oil, or the creation of magnetic fields or of large labyrinthine spaces.

There is no danger of fire or explosion.

The weight of the contact-parts, like that of the moving elements, is very moderate.

The contact-area is very ample, temperature-rises thus being obviated.

The contacts no longer have to be frequently inspected, the serious inconvenience thus caused to an electricity service thus being eliminated.

The disconnection-time is far shorter than at present, since there are no parts which successively have to change their direction of motion, this being a most important factor in the re-connection operation necessitated by short circuits.

All these advantages are obtained to the maximum extent, and still further advantages can be obtained by the second constructional version of the invention, as will be realized from the following description, given with reference to FIGS. 7l0 on the attached drawings, in which, wherever possible, the same reference-numbers have been retained for similar or different parts.

1 is a tube of hard mechanizable insulating material such as araldite resin, in which two tubular parts 2 and 2', of a highly conductive material such as hardened copper, which are connected to the electric circuit by the terminals 3 and 4, are rigidly embedded.

The inside of the three tubes 1, 2 and 2' forms a smooth surface without projections, like the jacket of the cylinder of an explosion-engine. Inside there is a cylindrical rod 6 of the same material as the tube 1, with a widened part 22 in the vicinity of its centre. At the top there is a screw-threaded part 23, of the same insulating material, and this, with the support 24, situated on the lower part of the rod, guides the movement of this latter in order to keep it at all times parallel to the axis of the tubular system 1, 2, 2.

At the top of the widened part 22 there is a movable bridge 17, consisting of two cylindrical halves of a highly conductive material, such as hard copper, its circumference at its upper and lower extremities being exactly equal to the interior of the tubular parts 2, 2, the said movable bridge being, vigorousiy pressed against the walls of .2, 2 by the action of powerful springs 25, which may, for example, be made of hardened steel.

6 The movable bridge 17 electrically bridges the input circuit 2 with the output circuit 2' when the switch is connected.

An insulating disc 26, of the same material as the rod 6, rests on the upper part of the movable bridge 17, and between the disc 26 and the part 23 there is a kind of elastic packing 8, made of material which is a good electrical insulant and which is incombustible, such as asbestos cord or a plastic of suitable shape and nature, such as araldite plastic. This packing 8, when the rod is at rest (see FIG. 7), is only slightly pressed against the internal wall of the tube 2', and it is only on the descending movement of the rod 6 (see FIGS. 8 and 10) that the said packing 8 is compressed suificien-tly to move the movable bridge 17, firmly pressed by its springs against the Walls of the tube 1, 2, 2', via the disc 26, which acts freely with respect to the rod 6. This compression of the packing 8, which acts in a radial direction both outwards and inwards, and in an axial direction against the head of the movable bridge 17, thus obstructing all possible leakage-paths, is the action which produces a tight seal against the internal walls of the tube 1, .2, 2, and this tight seal will continue until the rod 6 reaches the disconnected position of rest to which FIG. 10 refers.

When FIGS. 7 and 8 are compared it will be seen how the packing 8 has been compressed on the sudden descent of the rod 6, forming a perfect seal between the surfaces of the chamber.

The rod 6 has a widened part 27 at the bottom, to which said pant is affixed, by way of a closing-device, one of the ends of a bellows 28, of insulating-material, such as rubber or a suitable plastic. The other end of the bellows is affixed in a similar manner to the lower end of the tube 2', thus forming a tight chamber with the cylinder.

The switch is operated by means of the lever 29, rigidly connected to the shaft 311, which is common to the various phases of which the switch consists and which transmits its movement to the rod 6 via the connectingrod 31. The iron lever 29 can be acted upon by one of the electro-magnets 32 or 33, for the connectingor breaking-action.

At the top of the rod 6 there is a drilled hole 34 which establishes communication between the upper and the lower chamber of the cylinder 2, 2, in order to avoid compressions or depressions when the rod is displaced, as this would result in an undeniable braking-action.

The assembly consisting of the rod 6, the movable bridge 17 and the packing 8 will be termed the piston.

Let us now see how the switch operates: in FIG. 7 it is in the connected position. The current passes from the terminal 3 to the cylinder 2 and, via the movable bridge 17, to the tube 2' and to the output-terminal 4. The bellows 28 is com-pressed, and the two electro-magnets 32 and 33 are disconnected. The switch is held in the connected or disconnected position by any of the processes already known to electrical engineers for automatically maintaining certain limit positions, e.g. by a spring-loaded ball.

To disconnect the switch, the electro'magnet 33 is excited. It instantaneously attracts the lever 29 until the position shown by a broken line in FIG. 7 is reached.

As already mentioned, this sudden movement causes the head 23 of the piston to press the packing 8 against the dis-c 26, braked by the movable bridge 17, which remains motionless until the packing has been sufficiently compressed to overcome the action of the springs 25 against the internal wall of the cylinder 1, 2, 2..

At the moment when the upper edge of the movable bridge 1'7 leaves the lower edge of the cylinder 2, this position being illustrated in FIG. 8, the arc will commence between the two edges. But immediately, for example within a period of the order of a hundredth of a second, the space left between the said edges is occupied by the packing 8,.now firmly pressed against the internal walls of the tube formed by the parts 1, Z, 2, producing a tight seal both against the said walls and against the disc 26, and also against the rod 6. It is thus impossible for the arc to form, since its paths between the upper edge of the movable bridge 17 and the lower edge of the tube 2, are entirely obstructed by an insulating-medium.

In view of the rapidity with which the electromagnet functions, the speed imparted to the piston is extremely high, since the weight of the complete piston, for a lowtension switch of 500 amperes, is of the order of only 300 grams per phase. It is the fact that this high speed takes place simultaneously with the compression of the packing 8 that produces the tight seal, as occurs in an explosion-engine.

FIG. 10 shows the switch in the disconnected position, and the sealing action produced by the packing 8, when compressed, is clearly illustrated in this diagram.

As already mentioned, the interior of the cylinder, as well as the chamber formed by the bellows, are filled with an inert dry gas, such as nitrogen, at a pressure slightly above atmospheric. The absence of humidity enables the dimensions of the insulating-parts, as well as the gap between the contacts, i.e. the gap marked 35 in FIG. 10, to be reduced to the minimum, and the contact-parts to be made of hard electrolytic copper without risk of oxidation.

The coils of the electro-magnets 32 and 33 are only under low tension during the moment taken by the piston to move.

To re-connect, current is supplied to the coil of the electro-nagnet 32, which, on moving the iron lever 29 in the opposite direction to the preceding one, conveys the movable bridge 17 to the connected position shown in FIG. 7.

This process enables extremely short re-connecting times to be obtained.

7 The fact that the packing 8 is not at first firmly pressed against the walls of the cylinder 2 but only when the rod 6 commences its descent considerably reduces the force required to bring about the movement, since the friction against the walls of the cylinder is then very slight.

The sections of the cylinders 2 and 2', as Well as those of the movable bridge 17, depends on the intensity of the current at which the switch has to operate. The thickness of insulation 35 between the edges of 2 and 2', as well as the length of the movable bridge 17, the dimensions of the packing 8 and the characteristics of the insulating-rod 31 depend on the working voltage.

As the action required for the operation of the switch is merely that of connecting one or other of the two coils 32 and 33, this system enables very inexpensive circuitbreakers with a re-connecting device to be constructed, since the work which has to be done by the electro-rnagnet is practically negligible, and all that is required to ensure the re-connection is to instal a simple clockwork or bi-metal system to connect the coil 33 a short time after the switch has been disconnected.

The process described can obviously be applied with devices different from those discussed, and the system of protection thereby obtained will naturally be extended to these other devices likewise.

I claim:

1. A device, for accelerating electric switching and preventing the formation of an arc comprising, in combination,

current conducting means;

movably supported switch means;

a current conducting switch member supported by said switch means in a manner whereby said current conducting switch member is positioned in contact with and closes circuit with said current conducting means in a first position of said switch means;

substantially elastic electrical insulating material immovably supported adjacent said current conducting switch member by one of said means in a manner whereby in a second position of said switch means said substantially elastic electrical insulating material is positioned in compressed state between said current conducting means and said current conducting switch member so as to prevent formation of any arc and forms a substantially tight seal between the same;

and control means for automatically moving said switch means from its first to its second position instantaneously so that said substantially elastic electrical insulating material instantaneously replaces said current conducting switch member in position between said current conducting means and said current conducting switch member upon movement of said switch means from its first to its second position.

2. A device for accelerating electric switching and preventing the formation of an arc comprising, in combination,

spaced current conducting means;

movably supported switch means;

a current conducting switch member supported by said switch means in a manner whereby said current conducting switch member is positioned between and short circuits said current conducting means in a first position of said switch means;

substantially elastic electrical insulating material immovably supported adjacent said current conducting switch member by one of said means in a manner whereby in a second position of said switch means said substantially elastic electrical insulating material is positioned in compressed state between said current conducting means and said current conducting switch member so as to prevent formation of an arc and forms a substantially tight seal between the same;

and control means for automatically moving said switch means from its first to its second position instantaneously so that said substantially elastic electrical insulating material instantaneously is positioned in compressed state between said current conducting means and said current conducting switch member upon movement of said switch means from its first to its second position.

3. A device for accelerating electric switching and preventing the formation of an arc comprising, in combination,

first and second pairs of spaced current conducting means;

first and second movably supported switch means;

a first current conducting switch member supported by said first switch means in a manner whereby said first current conducting switch member is positioned between and short circuits said first current conducting means in a first position of said first switch means;

a second current conducting switch member supported by said second switch means in a manner whereby said second current conducting switch member is positioned between and short circuits said second current conducting means in a first position of said second switch means;

substantially elastic electrical insulating material immovably supported adjacent said first current conducting switch member by one of said switch means in a manner whereby in a second position of said one of said switch means said substantially elastic electrical insulating material is positioned in compressed state between said first current conducting means and said first current conducting switch member so as to prevent formation of an arc and forms a substantially tight seal between the same; 7

electrical conducting means connecting said first and second pairs of spaced current conducting means in a manner whereby in the first position of said switch means the said first and second pairs of spaced current conducting means form a single closed circuit having a single input terminal and a single output terminal; and

control means for automatically moving said first switch means from its first to its second position instantaneously so that said substantially elastic electrical insulating material instantaneously replaces said first current conducting switch member in position between said first current conducting means upon movement of said first switch means from its first to its second position.

4. A device for accelerating electric switching and preventing the formation of an arc comprising, in combination,

first and second pairs of spaced current conducting means;

first and second movably supported switch means;

a first current conducting switch member supported by said first switch means in a manner whereby said first current conducting switch member is positioned between and short circuits said first current conducting means in a first position of said first switch means;

a second current conducting switch member supported by said second switch means in a manner whereby said second current conducting switch member is positioned between and short circuits said second current conducting means in a first position of said second switch means;

substantially elastic electrical insulating material immovably supported adjacent said first current conducting switch member by said first switch means in a manner whereby in a second position of said first switch means said substantially elastic electrical insulating material is positioned in compressed state between said first current conducting means and said first current conducting switch member so as to prevent format-ion of an arc and forms a substantially tight seal between the same;

electrical conducting means connecting said first and second pairs of spaced current conducting means in a manner whereby in the firs-t position of said switch means the said first and second pairs of spaced current conducting means form a single closed circuit having a single input terminal and a single output terminal; and

spring biased control means for automatically moving said first switch means from its first to its second position instantaneously so that said substantially elastic electrical insulating material instantaneously replaces said first current conducting switch member in position between said first current conducting means upon movement of said first switch means from its first to its second position.

5. A device for accelerating electric switching and preventing the formation of an arc comprising, in com bination,

first and second pairs of spaced current conducting means;

first and second movably supported switch means;

a first current conducting switch member supported by said first switch means in a manner whereby said first current conducting switch member is positioned between and short circuits said first current conducting means in a first position of said first switch means;

a second current conducting switch member supported by said second switch means in a manner whereby said second current conducting switch member is positioned between and short circuits said second current conducting means in a first position of said second switch means;

substantially elastic electrical insulating material immovably supported adjacent said first current conducting switch member by said first switch means in a manner whereby in a second position of said first switch means said substantially elastic electrical insulating material is positioned in compressed state between said first current conducting means and said first current conducting switch member so as to prevent formation of an arc and forms a substantially tight seal between the same;

electrical conducting means connecting said first and second pairs of spaced current conducting means in a manner whereby in the first position of said switch means the said first and second pairs of spaced current conducting means form a single closed circuit having a single input terminal and a single output terminal; and

control means for automatically moving said first switch means from its first to its second position instantaneously so that said substantially elastic electrical insulating material instantaneously replaces said first current conducting switch member in position between said first current conducting means upon movement of said first switch means from its first to its second position, and for automatically moving said first switch means from its second position to a third position in which said first switch means is spaced from and open circuits said first pair of spaced current conducting means, said control means automatically moving said second switch means from its first position to a second position in which it is spaced from and open circuits said second pair of spaced current conducting means at substantially the same time that it moves said first switch means from its second to its third position.

6. A device for accelerating electric switching and preventing the formation of an arc comprising, in combination,

first and second pairs of spaced current conducting means;

first and second movably supported switch means;

a first current conducting switch member supported by said first switch means in a manner whereby said first current conducting switch member is positioned between and short circuits said first current conducting means in a first position of said first switch means;

a second current conducting switch member supported by said second switch means in a manner whereby said second current conducting switch member is positioned between and short circuits said second current conducting means in a first position of said second switch means;

substantially elastic electrical insulating material immovably supported adjacent said first current conducting switch member by said first switch means in a manner whereby in a second position of said first switch means said substantially elastic electrical insulating material is positioned in compressed state between said first current conducting means and said first current conducting switch member so as to prevent formation of an arc and forms a substantially tight seal between the same;

electrical conducting means connecting said first and second pairs of spaced current conducting means in a manner whereby in the first position of said switch means the said first and second pairs of spaced current conducting means form a single closed circuit having a single input terminal and a single output terminal;

control means for automatically moving said first switch means from its first to its second position instantaneously so that said substantially elastic electrical insulating material instantaneously replaces said first current conducting switch member in position between said first current conducting means upon movement of said first switch means from its first to its second position and for automatically moving said first switch means from its second posi tion to a third position in which said first switch means is spaced from and open circuits said first pair of spaced current conducting means, said control means automatically moving said second switch means from its first position to a second position in which it is spaced from and open circuits said second pair of spaced current conducting means at substantially the same time that it moves said first switch means from its second to its third position; and

auxiliary control means for automatically moving said second switch means from its second position back to its first position after said first switch means is moved from its second to its third position so that said second switch means is positioned between and short circuits said second current conducting means. 7. A device for accelerating electric switching and preventing the formation of an arc comprising, in combination,

first and second pairs of spaced current conducting means;

first and second movably supported switch means;

a first current conducting switch member supported by said first switch means in a manner whereby said first current conducting switch member is positioned between and short circuits said first current conducting means in a first position of said first switch means;

a second current conducting switch member supported by said second switch means in a manner whereby said second current conducting switch member is positioned between and short circuits said second current conducting means in a first position of said second switch means;

substantially elastic electrical insulating material immovably supported adjacent said first current conducting switch member by said first switch means in a manner whereby in a second position of said first switch means said substantially elastic electrical insulating material is positioned in compressed state between said first current conducting means and said first current conducing switch member so as to prevent formation of an arc and forms a substantially tight seal between the same;

electrical conducting means connecting said first and second pairs of spaced current conducting means in a manner whereby in the first position of said switch means the said first and second pairs of spaced cur rent conducting means form a single closed circuit having a single input terminal and a single output terminal;

control means for automatically moving said first switch means from its first to its second position instantaneously so that said substantially elastic electrical insulating material instantaneously replaces said first current conducting switch member in position between said first current conducting means upon movement of said first switch means from its first to its second position and for automatically moving said first switch means from its second position to a third position in which said first switch means is spaced from and open circuits said first pair of spaced current conducting means, said control means automatically moving said second switch means from its first position to a second position in which it is spaced from and open circuits said second pair of spaced current conducting means at substantially first and second pairs of spaced current conducting means;

movably supported switch means;

a movable electrically conductive bridge member supported by said switch means in a manner whereby said bridge member is positioned between and short circuits each of said first and second pairs of current conducting means thereby to provide a single closed circuit having a single input terminal and a single output terminal when said switch means is in its first position;

substantially elastic electrical insulating material immovably supported adjacent said bridge member by said switch means in a manner whereby in a second position of said switch means said substantially elastic electrical insulating material is positioned in compressed state between said first pair of spaced current conducting means so as to prevent formation of an arc and forms a substantially tight seal between said first pair of current conducting means;

control means for automatically moving said switch means from its first to its second position instantaneously so that said substantially elastic electrical insulating material instantaneously replaces said bridge member in position between said first pair of current conducting means upon movement of said switch means from its first to its second position.

9. A device for accelerating electric switching and preventing the formation of an arc comprising, in combination,

first and second pairs of spaced current conducting means;

movably supported switch means;

a movable electrically conductive bridge member supported by said switch means in a manner whereby said bridge member is positioned between and short circuits each of said first and second pairs of current conducting means thereby to provide a single closed circuit having a single input terminal and a single output terminal when said switch means is in its first position;

substantially elastic electrical insulating material immovably supported adjacent said bridge member by I said switch means in a manner whereby in a second position of said switch means said substantially elastic electrical insulating material is postioned in compressed state'between said first pair of spaced current conducting means so as to prevent formation of an arc and forms a substantially tight seal between said first pair of current conducting means; and

electromagnetic control means for automatically moving said switch means from its first to its second position instantaneously so that said substantially elastic electrical'insulating material instantaneously replaces said bridge member in position between said first pair of current conducting means upon movement of said switch means from its first to its second position.

10. A device for accelerating electric switching and preventing the formation of an arc comprising, in combination,

a housing having an inert dry gas therein;

first and second pairs of spaced current conducting means positioned in said housing;

movably supported switch means positioned in said housing;

a movable electrically conductive bridge member positioned in said housing and supported by said switch means in a manner whereby said bridge member is positioned between and short circuits each of said first and second pairs of current conducting means thereby to provide a single closed circuit having a single input terminal and a single output terminal when said switch means is in its first position;

substantially elastic electrical insulating material immovably supported adjacent said bridge member by said switch means in a manner whereby in a second position of said switch means said substantially elastic electrical insulating material is positioned in compressed state between said first pair of spaced current conducting means so as to prevent formation of an arc and forms a substantially tight seal between said first pair of current conducting means; and

replaces said bridge member in position between said first pair of current conducting means upon movement of said switch means from its first to its second position.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 649,554 Schwedtmann May 15, 1900 electromagnetic control means for automatically mov- 751 028 Th F b 2, 1904 ing said switch means from its first to its second 10 2,284,347 St May 26, 1942 position instantaneously so that said substantially 2,477,837 Strom Aug. 2, 1949 elastic electrical insulating material instantaneously 2,888,540 Gratzmuller May 26, 1959

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Referenced by
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US3430014 *Sep 20, 1965Feb 25, 1969Allen Bradley CoModular electric switch
US3466579 *Aug 19, 1966Sep 9, 1969Massachusetts Inst TechnologyHigh speed switching devices
US3792215 *May 17, 1972Feb 12, 1974Westinghouse Electric CorpElectrical load-break apparatus
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US4562323 *Feb 3, 1984Dec 31, 1985La Telemecanique ElectriqueSwitch device having an insulating screen inserted between the contacts during breaking and means for shearing the arc between this screen and an insulating wall
US4572933 *Aug 22, 1983Feb 25, 1986S&C Electric CompanyPressure-operated switch for a high-voltage interrupting module
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US5504289 *Mar 30, 1994Apr 2, 1996Abb Power T&D Company Inc.Circuit switching mechanism and charging system therefor
US5508487 *Mar 30, 1994Apr 16, 1996Abb Power T&D Company Inc.High voltage circuit interrupting device operating mechanism including trip latch assembly
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CN101595543BOct 16, 2007Nov 2, 2011阿雷瓦T&D股份公司Device for controlling an electrical appliance
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Classifications
U.S. Classification218/1, 218/117, 218/90
International ClassificationH01H3/00, H01H33/12, H01H33/04, H01H33/06, H01H3/30
Cooperative ClassificationH01H33/12, H01H3/3052, H01H33/06
European ClassificationH01H33/12, H01H3/30F, H01H33/06