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Publication numberUS3129860 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 21, 1964
Filing dateNov 14, 1962
Priority dateNov 14, 1962
Publication numberUS 3129860 A, US 3129860A, US-A-3129860, US3129860 A, US3129860A
InventorsFoster John A
Original AssigneeClark Mfg Co J L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Closure construction for sifting containers
US 3129860 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 21, 1964 3 J FOSTER 3,129,860

CLOSURE CONSTRUCTION FOR SIFTING CONTAINERS Filed Nov. 14, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 N VENTORZ- n 5 y April 21, 1964 I J. A. FOSTER 3,129,860

CLOSURE CONSTRUCTION FOR SIFTING CONTAINERS Filed Nov. 14, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 United States Patent 3,129,860 CLGSURE CfiNdTRUCTlQN Ffllil SHFEENG CONTAHQERS 30hr: A. Foster, Rockford, ilk, assignor to J. L. Clark Manufacturing Co., Rockford, Ill, a corporation of Illinois Filed Nov. 14, 1%2, Ser. No. 24-2,32 6 Claims. (Cl. 222512) This invention relates generally to dispensing containers and more particularly to a novel and distinctive closure construction having sifter openings in a disk which may be turned to bring the openings into or out of register With an opening in the top of the container.

The general object is to provide an improved sifter top which insures improved sealing of the sifter disk with positive cutoff of the material being dispensed and with no possibility of fine granular material becoming wedged beneath the disk, which does not require close manufacturing tolerances, and which permits assembly by high production machinery and manufacture at low cost.

Another object is to take advantage of the resiliently yieldable character of certain molded plastic materials not only to facilitate mounting on and close fitting of the sifter disk against the top of the container but also to insure ease of turning of the disk into and out of sifting position.

The invention also resides in the novel manner of journaling the disk on the top wall to stress the disk and achieve close face to face contact with the top wall.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention are attained by the construction and arrangement shown by way of illustration in the drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a fragmentary perspective view of a container equipped with a combined sifter and pouring top embodying the novel features of the present invention while also illustrating the manner of turning the sitter disk.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary section taken along the line 22 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an exploded perspective view of the fixed and rotatable parts of the improved closure.

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary exploded view of the parts of the closure plug shown in diametrical cross-section and in their initially formed shapes.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary view of a part of FIG. 2.

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the assembled plug showing a modified method of coupling the parts together.

FIGS. 7 and 8 are views similar to FIGS. 2 and 3 showin a modified construction.

FIG. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional View illustrating steps in the assembly of a sifter disk and top wall. FIG. 10 is an enlarged view of a portion of FIG. 7.

FIG. 11 is an enlarged view of a portion of FIG. 7.

In the form shown in the drawings for purposes of illustration, the invention is incorporated in the sheet metal top 12 of a container having a body 13 of generally rectangular cross-section joined to the top by a standard seam 3 .3. A movable sifter element in the form of a circular disk 14 is disposed in and seated against the bottom 15 of a cup-like depression Iii in the top 12 and journaled around its outer peripheral edge in the side wall of the cup for manual turning to different positions to bring one or more openings 11-6 in the disk into and out of register with a hole 17 in the bottom 15.

In the form shown in FIGS. 1 to 6, the top 12 comprises an outer flat metal sheet formed at its center with an upstanding rib 19 of triangular radial cross-section terminating in a cylindrical flange 20 which defines an opening 11 in the top. The depression or cup 10 is a separate sheet metal stamping with an upstanding cylindrical side wall 21 pressed into the rib with a tight fit to bring an outturned lip flange 22 against the top of the rib in the final assembly (see FIG. 2).

In the form shown in FIGS. 1 to 6, substantially the entire area of the cup bottom 15 is dished and pressed upwardly so as to form a gradually rounded dome-shaped top surface 26 of pronounced convex contour. The dome is part of a sphere and its height is about .050 of an inch for a diameter of 1.54 inches. Surrounding the gradually rounded peripheral edge 23 of the dome is a shallow groove 24 of narrow radial width having an outer cylindrical wall 25 preferably set inwardly a short distance from the cup wall 21. The dispensing opening 17 is a generally circular hole punched through the dome 15 and disposed near the outer edge thereof.

The sifter disk 14 is relatively thin and circular and composed of resiliently flexible plastic material such as for example high density polyethylene. The disk is larger in diameter than the dome edge 23 and smaller than the cup wall 21 and molded to a curvature correlated with that of the cup bottom so that the plastic material may be stressed somewhat and thereby held seated down over substantially the entire area of the dome surface. Herein the disk, as initially molded (see FIG. 4) is also part of a sphere of greater radius of curvature and therefore of lesser curvature than the dome 15, the depth of that part of the disk which contacts the dome surface being .040 of an inch in the present instance. Thus, when the disk as molded is placed in the cup with the center resting on the center of the dome surface 15, the periphery of the disk will be spaced above the edge 23 of the dome. The outer margin of the disk which then overhangs the edge 23 of the dome is turned downwardly quite sharply as in dicated at 27 to provide a downwardly inclined and preferably rounded top surface 28 around the outer edge of the disk.

The disk is journaled around its outer periphery in the side wall of the cup 10 for turning about the cup axis while being held stressed and in firm face to face contact with the entire area of the dome surface 26. To these ends, downward pressure is applied to the overhanging portion of the disk to bend the latter downwardly around the ledge 23 and thereby deform the disk and increase its curvature to that of the dome thus bringing the entire area of the disk into firm face to face contact with the dome surface. Such pressure is derived by any wellknown method such as rolling or otherwise deforming angularly spaced portions of the cup wall 21 and displacing the same inwardly in a plane disposed just above the ledge 23 so as to form a bead 29 or nibs as the case may be around the interior of the cup. In this operation, and with the resiliently flexible disk resting on top of the dome, the displaced metal first engages the downwardly rounded surface 28 at the disk edge and then, as the deformation continues, bends the overhanging margin downwardly around the ledge 23 to cam the margin downwardly until the disk has been brought into full face to face contact with the dome surface 26. Such action takes place around the entire periphery of the disk with the result that the disk is not only changed to the contour of the dome surface but, due to the flexibility of its material, accommodates itself accurately to the contour of the dome surface against which the disk is held under pressure over its entire area.

The groove 24 in the cup bottom is substantially deeper than the downward camming of the disk edge 27 so that in the final assembly (FIGS. 2 and 5), this edge is spaced above and never becomes pinched against the bottom of the groove. In this way, wide variations in the dimensions of the disk and cup are allowable and automatic production machinery may be employed in the assembling operation without danger of binding or locking of the parts together in their final relation.

Instead of forming a continuous groove 31 in the cup wall to provide the bead 29, angularly spaced lengths of the wall may be pressed inwardly to form depressions 32 (see FIG. 6) and correspondingly substantially straight but tangentially extending nibs corresponding in crosssection and position to the head. The nibs operate as before to press the disk against the dome 15.

It will be observed from FIGS. 5 and 6 that in the final assembly, the bead or the nibs project inwardly beyond the outer edge surface of the flexible disk margin 27 and overlies the latter so as to bear against the downwardly rounded surface 28 intermediate the edges of the latter. Thus the bead around the circular area of such engagement provides a bearing surface by which the disk is accurately centered on the dome and in which the disk is journaled for turning about the dome axis after overcoming the rubbing friction between the compressed plastic and metal surfaces of the disk and dome.

To provide for sifting of powdered material out of the container, the holes 16 are located near the periphery of the disk so as to come into registry with the dome hole 17 by turning the disk to the proper position. In other positions of the disk, the holes are covered and sealed effectually by the dome surface 26.

Because the disk is formed in a molding operation, a spout 34 for permitting pouring of the container contents may be added to the disk at a very low cost. Herein, the spout is a tube of about the size and shape of the dome hole 17 upstanding from the top of the disk and open at its lower end so as to come into full registry with the hole, when the disk is turned to the pouring position shown, in FIG. 2.

The upstanding spout may be utilized to advantage as part of an effective hand grip to facilitate easy turning of the disk between the sifting, pouring or closed positions. For this purpose, a projection 37 is molded integral with the top of the disk along a diameter through the spout and on the side of the disk remote from the latter. Preferably, the projection comprises a narrow rib 37 of squared cross-section extending from the inner side of the spout diametrically across the disk and well beyond the disk center. The rib is substantially shallower than the spout and is spaced radially from the holes 16 so as not to interfere with the contents while being sifted or poured from the container.

FIGS. 7 through 11 show a modification of the invention which will now be described using corresponding but primed numerals to identify the parts in common with the construction described above. In this form, the depression or cup is somewhat shallower and formed as an integral part of a single-piece stamping constituting the container top 12'. Initially, the sheet metal is stamped and contoured to the shape shown in FIG. 9 including a circular bottom or dome surface 15 having a top surface 26' of pronounced convex contour somewhat smaller in diameter than the original diameter of the molded plastic disk 14' and terminating at a peripheral shoulder 23'. The latter defines the top of the inner and shallow frustoconical wall 40 of a groove 24' whose outer wall 25' in the original stamping (FIG. 9) is generally cylindrical and somewhat larger than the disk 14' so that the latter will telescope loosely into the cup. To facilitate the clenching of the disk against the cup bottom, the metal of the top around the cup is bent outwardly and then downwardly to form the lip position of the cup as an upstanding rib 41.

In the modification, the dome surface 26' is somewhat shallower than in the form first described having a radius of curvature of about seven inches While the disk 14 is of correspondingly lesser curvature that is, greater in radius of curvature. In fact, the disk in its originally molded form is substantially flat over its full diameter as shown in FIGS. 9 and 10. As a consequence and as in the form first described, the outer margin of the disk, when the latter is placed in the cup or depression 10' as shown in phantom in FIG. 9 with its center contacting the center of the dome 15', is spaced above the edge 23' so that the disk will be brought into sealing contact with the entire area of the dome as the overhanging margin of the disk is bent downwardly below the edge 23'. The outer periphery 42 is substantially cylindrical but beveled somewhat at its upper edge 28', the same as in the form first described.

With the sheet metal of the top 12' formed to the contour shown in FIG. 9 and the flat disk 14' dropped into the cup, the bending of the disk into full contact with the dome surface may be effected in simple rolling or clenching operations. First, the lip bead 41 is rolled inwardly toward the periphery 42 of the disk thus inclining the inner cup wall 25' as shown in FIG. 10. By continuing the inward bending of the rib while pressing the same downwardly, the rib comes into overlying relation and engages the edge 28' and bends the disk periphery downwardly to change the contour of the disk. This action is continued until the disk has come into full face to face contact with the dome 15' as shown in FIG. 11 with the lower edge 44 of the disk periphery spaced slightly above the bottom of the groove 24'. Only the edge 28' of the disk remains in contact with the cup wall 25 which forms the bearing for journaling the disk to turn freely about the dome axis.

Other variations in the relative contours of the plastic disk and the metal bottom of the cup may be employed so long as the outer periphery of the disk remains spaced above the outer edge 23' of the cup bottom when the disk is placed in the cup with its center in contact with the center of the cup bottom. That is to say, the cup bottom may be made substantially flat and the disk molded so as to present a concave upper surface.

It will be observed that the cup 10 and disk 14 formed and coupled together as above described constittue a unitary assembly which may be assembled, handled, centered relative to each other, pressed into sealing contact, and journaled together by automatic operations performed by high production machinery. Molding of the disk of resiliently flexible material results in numerous advantages. First, the provision of sifting holes, a pouring spout, and a hand grip is achieved at a low over-all cost considering the advantageous characteristics of these elements as above described. Of equal importance is the avoidance of metal to metal contact between the disk and its support. Being resilient and relatively yieldable, the plastic deflects easily without heavy loading and provides a smooth bearing contact with the cup bottom. As a con sequence, an extremely tight rubbing fit is maintained at all times around the dome opening 17 thus minimizing the possibility of the container contents, even when a powder, becoming wedged between the dome and disk.

This application is a continuation-in-part of my copending application Serial No. 71,268, filed November 23, 1960, now abandoned.

I claim as my invention:

1. A sifter top for a dispensing container comprising a rigid sheet metal top wall defining an annular rigid dome having a top surface of pronounced convex curvature and a hole therethrough offset laterally from the axis of the dome, an upright wall larger than said dome and surrounding the latter to form an annular upwardly opening intervening groove below the periphery of the dome, a disk of resiliently yieldable plastic larger than and lying against the top of said dome and molded to an initial curvature less than that of said dome surface, and means formed out of said upright wall and overlying the edge of said disk to bend the overhanging margin thereof downwardly to and against the peripheral edge of said dome and hold the disk in tight face to face contact with said dome surface while permitting turning of the disk about its axis, said disk having a perforation therein adapted to register with said hole in one angular position of said dome and to be covered by the latter in other positions.

2. A sifter top as defined by claim 1 in which said top dome surface at the junction of said groove and the outer edge of said dome is rounded outwardly and downwardly and said disk margin is bent downwardly and around the rounded portion of said top wall.

3. A sifter top for a dispensing container comprising a rigid dome having a top surface of pronounced convex curvature and at least one hole therethrough offset laterally from the dome axis, a disk of resiliently yieldable molded plastic lying on top of and centered relative to said dome and having an initial curvature less than that of the dome, the outer margin of said disk overhanging the outer edge of said dome surface, at least one hole extending through said disk in a position to register with said dome hole in one angular position of the disk and to be blocked by said dome surface in other angular positions, and means coupling said disk to said top for turning about said axis while bending said overhanging outer margin of the disk downwardly to the curvature of the disk and press the latter yieldably into firm face to face contact with said dome surface.

4. A sifter top for a dispensing container comprising a rigid upwardly opening cup having a bottom providing a top surface of pronounced convex curvature smaller than the side wall of the cup, the outer portion of said cup bottom cooperating with said side wall to define an upwardly opening annular groove, a disk of resiliently yieldable molded plastic material larger than said dome surface and lying on top of and centered relative to said convex surface with the outer margin of the disk overhanging the edge of said dome surface, and means for coupling said disk and cup together for turning of the disk about the axis of the cup comprising formations on said side wall overlying the outer edge of said disk and bending the same downwardly into said groove to thereby bend the disk to the curvature of said dome and bring the disk into full face to face contact with said dome surface with the outer edge of the disk spaced above the bottom of said groove, and holes in said disk and said cup bottom adapted to register With each other in one angular position of the disk.

5. A sifter top for a dispensing container comprising a rigid top surface of a predetermined curvature having at least one hole therein ofiset laterally from the axis of the surface, a circular disk of resiliently yieldable plastic larger in diameter than and covering said top surface and having an initial curvature sufliciently different from said surface to space the periphery of the disk above the periphery of said surface when the disk is resting on said surface with the centers of the disk and surface in contact and with the periphery of the disk overhanging the periphery of said surface, means coupling said disk to said top for turning about said axis comprising an upright Wall rigid with said top surface and surrounding the latter, a portion of the upright wall overlying the overhanging portion of said disk periphery While holding the same bent downwardly against the outer edge of said rigid surface with the under surface of the disk in firm face to face contact with said surface, and at least one hole extending through said disk in a position to register with said first hole in one angular position of the disk and to be blocked by the surface in other angular positions.

6. A sifter top as defined in claim 5 in which said rigid surface is of convex curvature and said plastic disk when free is substantially flat.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 887,760 Blood May 10, 1908 2,254,581 Punte Sept. 2, 1941 2,832,514 OConnor Apr. 29, 1958 2,833,452 Drummond et al. May 6, 1958

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US887760 *Apr 10, 1907May 19, 1908Arthur J BloodReceptacle for granular or pulverulent materials.
US2254581 *May 2, 1940Sep 2, 1941Continental Can CoContainer for spices and the like
US2832514 *Oct 4, 1955Apr 29, 1958Morton Salt CoContainer
US2833452 *Dec 21, 1956May 6, 1958Kaiser Aluminium Chem CorpDredge top dispenser nestable with like containers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3251517 *May 19, 1965May 17, 1966Clark Mfg Co J LRotary closure
US5161713 *Apr 23, 1991Nov 10, 1992Board Of Regents Of The University Of Wisconsin System (Uw -Stout)Tamper-evident rotor top
US5290258 *Jul 27, 1992Mar 1, 1994Genesis Industries, Inc.Syringe for administering sequentially multiple doses of a medicament
US6070624 *Oct 9, 1997Jun 6, 2000Packaging Systems, L.L.C.Service-line valve connector and spout valve
US8286817Oct 20, 2008Oct 16, 2012Mccormick & Company, IncorporatedTamper resistant container with locking rim
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/512, D09/450, 222/480, 222/548
International ClassificationA47J47/01, B65D47/26, A47J47/00, B65D47/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47J47/01, B65D47/265
European ClassificationB65D47/26D4, A47J47/01