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Publication numberUS3131831 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 5, 1964
Filing dateNov 30, 1960
Priority dateNov 30, 1960
Publication numberUS 3131831 A, US 3131831A, US-A-3131831, US3131831 A, US3131831A
InventorsAlexander Dorchak
Original AssigneeAlexander Dorchak
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Opener for a dispenser
US 3131831 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 5, 1964 A. DORCHAK 3,131,831

OPENER FOR A DISPENSER Filed Nov. 50, 1960 \II IH'" United States Patent 3,131,831 DPENER FOR A DISPENSER Alexander Dorchak, 1316 McKinley Ava, Yakima, Wash. Filed Nov. 30, 1960, Ser. No. 72,674 Claims. (Cl. '22286) This invention relates to a combination can opener and liquid dispenser.

An object of my invention is to provide such a device having separate air inlet and liquid outlet tubes, each having a separate cutting edge at one end for piercing the can to permit entry of the tubes.

Another object is to provide such a novel device with such tubes mounted in a frame, said frame being further adapted with a rubber gasket which will forrm a seal against the top of the can to prevent leakage around the outer sides of the tubes when they are inserted in the can.

Another object of the invention is to provide the combination described with a cover for the tubes which is hinged to the frame and disposed in a manner to close the tubes at their outer ends and which also is disposed to provide a pad for driving the tubes into the container by hand.

Another object of the invention is to provide a leg on said frame extending downward alongside the can and adapted with means at its lower end for engaging the bottom of the can to hold the tubes in position in the can and to compress the gasket against the can thereby to prevent leakage.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will appear from a reading of the following detailed description with reference to the attached drawings.

In the drawings FIGURE 1 is a side elevation of the combination can opener and liquid dispensing device embodying my invention, and

FIGURE 2 is a front elevation of FIGURE 1, and

FIGURE 3 is a top plane view of FIGURE 1.

in FIGURE 1 reference character It denotes a liquid outlet tube attached together with an air inlet tube 12 in a frame 14. Both tubes '10 and 12 extend an equal length above the frame to their upper ends and extend below the frame, the lower end 20 of the air inlet tube preferably extending below end 22 of the liquid tube as shown. Both tubes 19 and 12 are adapted at their lower ends 20 and 22 with cutting edges for piercing a metal can. Preferably the ends 20 and 22 of the tubes are cut diagonally as shown so that the sharpened edges will progressively pierce and cut the metal can as the tubes are pressed downward into the metal can cover to form holes through which the tubes may be inserted. The tubes and 12 may be spaced apart laterally but preferably are disposed adjacent, side by side, as shown, to make the structure more rigid. The piercing point of each lower edge 26 and 22 is disposed on the inner side of each tube. Thus, when the tubes are adjacent both points will enter the top of the can at approximately the same point.

The tubes 10 and 12 are held by a frame 14 which is attached around the outer sides of each tube. The frame may be welded, soldered, or joined by other suitable means to the tubes. Preferably the apertures in the frame are sealed between the frame and the tubes and a rubber gasket 34 is attached to the underside of the frame around the tubes. Thus, when the tubes are pushed into the can the gasket will form a seal between the can and the frame, around the tubes, thus preventing loss of liquid from the holes pierced in the can by the tubes.

The frame 14 is extended at one end and turned upward to form a lug 24 on which a lid 26 is hinged by a suitable hinge. The lid 26 extends across the upper ends 16 and 18 of thetuhes, as shown. The tube ends 16 and 18 and 3,131,831 Patented May 5,1964

ice.

the lid 26 are co-operatively adapted so that the lid will close down over the tubes. A thumb handle 28 may be provided to raise and lower the hinged lid 26.

The frame is extended at its other end to form a leg 34 which is turned down and extends downward along the side of the can. At a length suitable to fit the particular size can on which the device is to be used, the lower end of the leg is turned inward to engage under the lower edge of the can. Thus, the leg provides an outer attachment to the can for holding the tubes securely in the can and also to urge the frame 14 against the gasket to insure a good seal.

The frame, leg, and lug may be an integral member formed from a single strip of material, for instance from a strip of steel. The tubes are made of steel or other suitable material strong enough to pierce a metal can. The hinged cover may be formed of any suitable material such as steel, moulded plastic, or the like.

In one embodiment, the liquid tube is 1 id, o.d. and the air tube is .1 id. and A" o.d. These dimensions are not critical and are recited only for illustration. The air tube may be of smaller diameter than the liquid tube because of the use intended. It is preferable that the liquid flow tube should extend only a short distance inside the can and that the air tube should extend farther into the can toward the bottom. Thus, when the can is inverted for pouring, the liquid will flow from the can down through the liquid tube and air will flow upward through the air tube into the can.

To insert the device in a can, the point of the lower edge of the air tube is placed against the top of the can at a radial distance inward from the upper edge far enough to permit the gasket to lie flush against the top of the can and the leg extends downward along the side of the can. With the lid 26 closed against the tube ends to :form a pad, the tube may be forced downward with the heel of ones hand, piercing the can and cutting a. hole through which the air tube enters. As the tubes move downward the point of the liquid tube pierces the can and the lower edge 22 cuts another hole for the liquid tube. The tubes are then pressed farther down until the gasket lies flush against the top of the can. Meanwhile, the leg 30 has moved downward along the outer side of the can as the frame has moved toward the top of the can. When the tubes are fully inserted, the turned-in portion at the lower end of the leg is snapped under the lower edge of the can. This will urge the frame downward to hold the gasket tight against the top of the can.

The lid may be opened on its hinge and liquid may be poured through the liquid tube 10 by inverting the can. Simultaneously, air will flow into the can through the air inlet tube 12.

The can may be stored keeping the dispenser device in place and with the lid 26 closed to protect the contents. When the contents of the can is exhausted the device may be removed, cleaned, and used again. The device is removed by simply disengaging the leg from the lower edge and withdrawing the tubes.

It is to be understood that the embodiments described herein may be varied somewhat without departing from the appended claims which define the scope of my invention.

I claim:

1. A device for opening metal cans and dispensing liquids therefrom compirsing a rigid frame member defining first and second abutting apertures therethrough, a substantially straight rigid liquid outlet tube having upper and lower ends and extending through and fixedly attached in said first aperture, a substantially straight rigid air inlet tube having upper and lower ends and disposed 3 parallel to said liquid outlet tube and extending through and fixedly attached in said second aperture, said liquid outlet tube being shorter than and abutting said air inlet tube, said liquid outlet tube being attached along at least a portion of its length of said air inlet tube, and cutting edges at the lower end of each tube for piercing a metal can proximate an edge thereof.

2. The device of claim 1 further comprising a leg extending from said frame downward and adapted at its lower end with means for engaging the lower edge of a can.

3. The device of claim 1 further comprising a gasket attached to the underside of said frame and extending around said apertures.

' 4. The device of claim 1 further comprising a lid for said tube hinged to a lug extending from said frame and adapted to cover the openings at the upper ends of said tubes.

5.'A device for opening metal cans and dispensing liquid therefrom comprising a rigid integral frame mem- -ber bent to form a first section including first and second abutting apertures there/through, a second section disposed at right angles to said first section and terminating at a lower end, a third section disposed upwards of said first section and including hinge means, a substantially straight rigid liquid outlet tube having upper and lower liquid outlet tube being attached along at least a port-ion of its length to said air inlet tube, cutting edges at the lower end of each tube for piercing a metal can proximate an edge thereof, means disposed at the lower end of said second section to engage a lower end of a container, and a lid hinged to said'third section and movable to cover the upper ends of said liquid outlet and air inlet tubes.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,075,723 Peltason Oct. 14, 1913 1,279,667 Davis Sept. 24, 1918 1,280,675 Cullen Oct. 8, 1918 r 1,343,782 Kerr June 15, 1920 1,360,211 Grim Nov. 23, 1920 2,812,112 Allen Nov. 5, 1957 2,817,372 Barr et a1 Dec. 24, 1957 FOREIGN PATENTS 270,134 Switzerland Nov. 16, 1950

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1075723 *Oct 14, 1913Leo H PeltasonCombined can container and perforator.
US1279667 *May 21, 1917Sep 24, 1918Raymond V DavisCombined cream-separator and bottle-stopper.
US1280675 *Apr 22, 1918Oct 8, 1918George E VernierCan utensil.
US1343782 *Nov 12, 1919Jun 15, 1920Kerr John WCan cap and seal
US1360211 *Oct 17, 1919Nov 23, 1920Grim Eugene SDispensing device
US2812112 *May 3, 1956Nov 5, 1957Frank AllenCan opener and dispenser
US2817372 *Mar 21, 1955Dec 24, 1957Barr John WTransfusion assembly
CH270134A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3258168 *May 15, 1964Jun 28, 1966Continental Can CoBayonet spout with guide shield and piercing portion
US3370762 *Mar 16, 1966Feb 27, 1968Gaskel & Chambers Non Drip MeaDevices for delivering measured quantities of liquid
US4103358 *Sep 3, 1975Jul 25, 1978Picker CorporationFluid mixing and dispensing system
US4271983 *May 8, 1978Jun 9, 1981Toppan Printing Co., Ltd.Liquid-withdrawing device
US4697622 *Jun 13, 1986Oct 6, 1987Parker Hannifin CorporationPassive filling device
USRE30610 *Feb 9, 1979May 12, 1981Picker CorporationFluid mixing and dispensing system
WO1992000883A1 *Jul 4, 1991Jan 23, 1992Jung Min LeeCarton pack attached with built-in plug
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/86, 222/89
International ClassificationB67B7/48, B67B7/00
Cooperative ClassificationB67B7/26
European ClassificationB67B7/26