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Publication numberUS3131900 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 5, 1964
Filing dateMay 15, 1962
Priority dateMay 15, 1962
Publication numberUS 3131900 A, US 3131900A, US-A-3131900, US3131900 A, US3131900A
InventorsAnderson Robert J, Moline Douglas A
Original AssigneeAnderson Robert J, Moline Douglas A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Self leveling paint can holder attachment for ladders
US 3131900 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1964 R. J. ANDERSON ETAL 3, ,900

SELF LEVELING PAINT CAN HOLDER ATTACHMENT FOR LADDERS Filed May 15, 1962 INVENTORS 203551 J 41/121230,

oUe'zAsA. MOUNE ATTORNEY United States Patent "ice 3,131,900 SELF LEVELING PAINT CAN HOLDER ATTACHMENT FOR LADDERS Robert J. Anderson, 1716 7th St. NE, and Douglas A. Moline, 3609 3rd Place NW., both of Rochester, Minn. Filed May 15, 1962, Ser. No. 194,900 1 Claim. (Cl. 248-210) This invention relates broadly to holders for paint cans and the like; more particularly to a paint can holder attachment for ladders of all kinds; and specifically to a self-leveling paint can holder attachment for ladders.

The principal object of this invention is to provide a paint can holder of the class described that is entirely self-leveling when attached to the side rails of a ladder.

Another object of this invention is to provide a paint can holder of the class described wherein in addition to its self-leveling feature, may also be locked at a tilted angle if so desired.

A further object of this invention is to provide a paint can holder of the class described that is free for longitudinal movement along either side rail of a conventional ladder of any type and which may' be locked on said side rails of the ladder at any desired position.

A further object of this invention is to provide a paint can holder of the class described that is capable of supporting cans of various sizes without adjustment and which will still maintain its self-leveling abilities.

Another object of this invention is to provide a paint can holder of the class described that is relatively inexpensive to manufacture, is rugged, is easy to attach and detach from a ladder, and which is easy to clean.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a self-leveling paint can holder attachment for ladders that may be left positioned on the side rails of said ladders while the same are adjusted relative to the supporting surfaces against which the ladder may rest Within almost any angular limits.

These and other objects of the invention will become apparent from the following specification and claim when taken in conjunction with the appended drawing, in which like characters indicate like parts throughout the several views:

To the above end, generally stated, the invention consists of the following devices and combinations of devices hereinafter described and defined in the claim.

Referring to the drawing:

HG. 1 is a perspective view of the invention attached to the side rail of a conventional ladder.

FIG. 2 is a top plan View of the invention attached to a ladder fragmentarily shown, and,

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 2 with the exception that the invention is shown in side elevation.

The numeral 4 will hereinafter he directed to the invention as an entirety, the numeral 5 to the paint can supported thereby, and the numeral 6 to the ladder as an entirety.

The numeral 7 indicates a relatively open cage-like receptacle or basket for supporting and confining a standard size paint can. This receptacle as shown in one preferable form comprises a pair of crossed metal straps 8 forming a substantially open bottom portion thereof said strap-like members being thence upturned at 90* degrees to the plane of the said bottom members to form side members 9 of the receptacle 7. A relatively wide annular rim 10 rigidly secured to the upturned vertically disposed side members provides a top member of the receptacle. It will be understood that the receptacle 7, with the exception of the annular top rim 10 may be stamped from a single sheet of material to form the bottom and side members thereof, or the same may be formed of independent strap members one of which is 3,131,900 Patented May 5, 1964 provided with an offset at its longitudinal center to afford a level unbroken surface where the said independent straps are crowed. This is a manufacturing detail but worthy of note to anyone contemplating the manufacture of the device as obviously, this construction will prevent rocking movements of a paint can supported on the bottom members 8.

A relatively heavy screw-threaded stud 11 is pivotally mounted in the upper end portion of one of the side members 9 of the receptacle 7 and the annular rimv 10 and is held therein securely against any endwise or lateral wobble movements by any conventional means. A sleeve 12 is mounted to encircle the stud 11 and is acted upon by a locking member '13 that has screw-threaded engagement with the stud 11. The inner end portion of the sleeve 12 has abutting engagement with the outer upper end portion of one of the side members 9 to which the stud 11 is pivotally secured and the outer end portion of said sleeve 12 has abutting engagement with the inner face of the locking member 13.

It may be well to note at this time that in actual mmiufacturing practice it may be necessary to Weld a relatively heady boss, not shown, to the outer upper end portion of the said side member 9 on which the stud 11 is mounted to provide a more rigid pivot point, and mount, between said stud 11 and said receptacle 7. In such construction, the inner end portion of the sleeve 12 would abut against the boss rather than the upper end portion of the outer side of the side member 9 as shown.

Obviously, by turning the screw-threaded locking member 13 into engagement with the sleeve 12 the pivotal movements of the receptacle 7 can be controlled for either self-leveling adjustment or be locked in any desired position relative to the ladder 6.

Secured to the outer end portion of the screw-threaded stud 11 is a relatively heavy C-clamp having a fixed jaw 15 and a movable jaw 15 that is rotatably mounted on the outer end portion of an advancing screw 16. The main frame of the C-clamp 14 including the fixed jaw 15 is constructed and dimensioned to engage the side rails 17 of the ladder 6 with a relatively loose working fit to facilitate endwise longitudinal movement along the said side rail 17. As indicated by the numeral 18, the main frame of the C-clamp is offset in the form of a depression to afford clearance for the several types of protrusions found on most ladders to secure the same in assembled relation and in some instances, to strengthen the rungs 19 of the ladder 6.

The screw-threaded advancing screw 16 and its mounted movable jaw 15' has screw-threaded engagement with a side leg 20 of the main frame of the C-clamp 14. As shown, a fixed nut 21 is rigidly mounted on the side leg 20 to afford a greater bearing surface for the advancing screw 16, however, it will be understood, that in actual manufacturing practice a fixed boss could be formed integral with the said side leg 20.

Obviously, to install the invention on either side rail 17 of the ladder 6 it is only necessary to open the C- clamp 14 to sufiicient width to permit the same to be positioned on the said side rail with the clamp held in engagement with the side rail the advancing screw 16 is turned down until its movable jaw 15 engages the opposite side of the rail than that engaged 'by the fixed jaw 15 of the main C-clarnp frame and is then tightened sufficiently to prevent slippage of the clamp on said rail.

As stated, the locking member may be adjusted at time to control the pivotal movements of the receptacle or said locking member 13 may remain out of en gage-ment with the sleeve 12 to permit free self-leveling movement of the receptacle 7.

It will be understood that to achieve the self-leveling action of the receptacle relative to the C-clamp and the of embodiments of the structure, process and product of the invention herein presented, it is possible to produce still other embodimentswithoutdeparting from the inventive concept herein disclosed, and it is desired, therefore,

that only such limitations be imposed on the appended claim as are stated herein or required by the prior art.

What we claim is: V

A self-leveling paint can holder for use with a ladder having side rails, comprising in combination, a C-clamp having a main frame, said main frame having a flanged end portion dimensioned to engage with a loose working fit, one of the side portions of the side'rails of a ladder, said flanged end portion affording a fixed jaw, a movable jaw also flanged to engage the said side rails of the ladder, said movable jaw being mounted rotatably on an advancing screw having screw-threaded engagement with the main frame of the C-clamp, whereby when the said advancing screw is turned down, the said movable jaw is moved into engagement with the other edge portion of the said rail of the ladder and thereby secure the C-clamp at any predetermined position on the side rails of the ladder, a screw-threaded stud pivotal-1y mounting a receptacle on the C-clamp, a sleeve mounted on the screw-threaded stud having longitudinal movement thereon and a locking member having screw-threaded engagement with the said stud, said sleeve being loosely interposed on the screwthreaded stud between the receptacle and the lockingmembet whereby said locking member may be turned into engagement with the sleeve to urge said sleeve into abutting engagement with the receptacle to frictionally control the pivotal movements of the said receptacle.

References Cited the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 7 Toune Nov. 10,- 1959

Patent Citations
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US2912205 *Aug 23, 1957Nov 10, 1959Toune Edward PPaint bucket holder
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3246867 *Jun 19, 1964Apr 19, 1966Lee Ewing AlbertReceptacle holders
US3420486 *Dec 8, 1966Jan 7, 1969Baker Charles ELadder bracket
US3961766 *Aug 21, 1975Jun 8, 1976Brothers Alvin OContainer holding arrangement
US3987993 *Dec 22, 1975Oct 26, 1976Hopkins Jeffrey EPaint can support and brush receptacle
US4612856 *Nov 3, 1983Sep 23, 1986Roger JenningsPainter's cap printing
US4714162 *Dec 17, 1986Dec 22, 1987Harrison Kim AFluorescent light bulb holder
US4776550 *Aug 6, 1987Oct 11, 1988Storey Willie JPaint bucket holder for ladder
US4901638 *May 23, 1986Feb 20, 1990R. Jennings Manufacturing Co., Inc.Painter's cap printing
US5100089 *Dec 6, 1990Mar 31, 1992Mclemore Jr Charles EMason level holder
US5106045 *Jul 19, 1991Apr 21, 1992Bezotte Jack ELadder caddy apparatus
US5383533 *Feb 16, 1994Jan 24, 1995Nikula; DaleLadder clamping device
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Classifications
U.S. Classification248/210, 248/231.71, 248/311.2
International ClassificationE06C7/00, E06C7/14
Cooperative ClassificationE06C7/14
European ClassificationE06C7/14