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Publication numberUS3132848 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 12, 1964
Filing dateMay 22, 1961
Priority dateMay 22, 1961
Publication numberUS 3132848 A, US 3132848A, US-A-3132848, US3132848 A, US3132848A
InventorsLeslie H Garlinghouse
Original AssigneeGarlinghouse Brothers
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Quick mixer
US 3132848 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 12, 1964 l.. H. GARLlNGHousE 3,132,848

QUICK MIXER INVENTOR. LEsL/E H. GQL/NGHOUSE BY 3M wa/AM ATTORNEYS Filed May 22, 1961 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENToR. lEsL/E IL Gnu/Ms House ATTORNEYS May 12, 1964 L. H. GARLlNGl-louse 3,132,848

QUICK MIXER 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed May 22, 1961 "INI/ENTOR. ESL/E H GQRL/NGHOUSE ATTORNEYS 4 May 12, 1964 l.. H. GARLINGHoUsE 3,132,848

QUICK MIXER Filed May 22, 1961 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 IN VEN TOR. ESL/E H. QL/Ne House 34Min Mmc/QM,

ATTORNEYS United States Patent O 3,132,848 QUICK R Leslie H. Garlinghouse, Pasadena, Calif., assigner to Garlinghonse Brothers, Los Angeles, Calif., a copartnership Filed May 22, 1961, Ser. No. 129,918 1S Claims. (Cl. 259-72) The invention relates to mixing devices land is one especially well adapted to the mixing of ingredients where it is advantageous to complete the mixing as quickly as possible when there is call -for delivery of the mixed product, especially where the ingredients once mixed must be used immediately but which in an unmixed condition can be held for a relatively long period. The mixing device and system herein disclosed, although especially Well adapted to the mixing of concrete, is equally well adapted to the mixing of other materials both in a dry state and in a liquid state.

There are certain types of materials, of which the ingredients of concrete represent an example which, when preserved in a dry, unmixed condition, can be stored for indefinite lengths of time and either held in stock piles or shipped in that condition without need for special handling or special preservation, When, however, mixing has been accomplished as in the case of concrete,

the mixture must be made use of with considerable promptness in order that the mixture does not begin to set before being removed from lthe mixer or perhaps before being removed from some discharge hopper, con- -tainer or bucket. The same condition holds true of a varity of other materials as, for example, certain plastics incorporating chemical hardeners and catalysts which cause the mass, once mixed, to set up in a relatively hard condition.

In recognition of the `foregoing circumstances in the handling of concrete which is a typical example, an extensive business has been built up wherein the ingredients are mixed in transit in devices mounted on trucks While the ingredients are being transported from a source of supply to a particular job where the concrete is to be poured. Although it is possible to carry only a dry mix in the mixer during transportation with water transported in a readily -available tank so that the concrete will not be mixed too soon, this means of handling the situation has its limitations. Transit mix trucks are expensive pieces of equipment and where they are transporting nothing but dry sand, dry gravel, and dry cement from one place -to another it becomes an expensive way of hauling such ingredients which could just as readily be done in much less expensive dump trucks.

Further still, such transit mix trucks are large and heavy and clearly the container in which the ingredients are mixed in transit must be -an integral part of the transit mix truck. Hence, it is not one which for practical reasons can be disengaged from the truck at any time should it become desirable to use the mixer itself as a concrete placing bucket.

The limitations of this type of equipment leave much to be desired for the most eicient and economical handling of material of this kind in particular. Many of the same circumstances hold true of other ltypes of material which need mixing before use.

'It is therefore among the objects of the invention to provide a new and improved rapid mixer for materials which by resort to a simple mechanical motion causes a complete and thorough mixture of varied ingredients during a space of time that can be measured in relatively few seconds.

Another object of the invention is -to provide a new and improved quick mixing device capable of handling either dry, pasty or liquid ingredients and which in a few brief moments of operation is capable of thoroughly mixing the ingredients in either small quantities or in very large quantities -to a condition where -they are ready for immediate use, the system and device being such as to be capable of use either as a batch mixer or a continuous mixer.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved mixing device for varied ingredients which can be employed as a container for transporting the material in unmixed -form to the destination and on occasions even lifted to the precise locality Where placement of the material is to take place and there mixed almos-t instantaneously ready for use.

Another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved rapid mixer for materials which comprises a container entirely clear on the interior whereby to avoid the presence of operating parts which may be subject to wear and abrasion, which may be of such character as to provide a source of objectionable impurities to the mix, or which may be of such character as to necessitate servicing and replacement.

Another object of the invention is to provide a new land improved quick mixing device for various and sundry materia-ls and ingredients which can be builtin virtually any size and which in Whatever size may be chosen is capable `of extremely rapid mixing potential by use of a relatively small amount of power applied momentarily only `and accordingly one capable of achieving a very rapid mix at a relatively inexpensive rate, especially in that the mixing need not begin until the mix is actually needed whereupon the mixture can be immediately discharged and employment of power discontinued.

With these andkother objects in view, the invention consists in the construction, arrangement and combination of the various parts of the device, whereby the objects contemplated are attained, as hereinafter set forth, pointed out in the appended claims and illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

FIGURE l is a side elevational view of one `form of the device set up as a batch mixer mounted upon an automobile truck chassis.

FIGURE 2 is a rear View of -the device of FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary elevational view of the wobble diive of FIGURE l, partially broken away.

FIGURES 4, 5 `and 6 are successive schematic views of the container and wobble support showing successive positions in the cycle of operation.

FIGURE 7 is a side elevational view of a modied `form of the device.

FIGURE 8 is a fragmentary plan view of the device of FIGURE 7. l

FIGURE 9 is a side elevational view of another form of the device.

FIGURE 10 is a side elevational View of still another form of the device resting temporarily in a position for mixing upon a trailer.

FIGURE l1 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the upper portion ofthe device of FIGURE l0 in the position assumed after being lifted clear of the trailer.

FIGURE l2 is a form of the device somewhat similar to the device of FIGURE 10 but mounted for operation as a continuous mixer.

FIGURE 13 is still another form of device constructed in a manner to provide continuous mixing, the device being shown schematically in side elevation.

FIGURE 13a is a cross sectional view on the line 13a13a of FIGURE 13.

FIGURE 14 is a vertical sectional view of a device somewhat similar to that shown in FIGURE 4 but with the interior arranged slightly diierently.

form of the device.

In one of the embodiments of the invention chosen for the purpose of illustration a container for materials to be mixed indicated generally by the reference character itl is shown mounted upon a typical truck chassis l1 constituting a mobile support for the container by means of which it can be transported at will to its destination.

More particularly there is provided upon the chassis a frame comprising columns l2 placed forwardly of the chassis and columns 1.3 placed rearwardly. Beams 14 extend from the tops of the columns 12 to the tops of the columns 13 and corresponding beams (not shown) extend transversely to complete the supporting framework for the container id. For convenience a pivot connection 15 may be provided between the tops of the columns 13 and the beams I4 so that by making use of a hydraulic lift device 16, one element 17 on each side being secured to a bracket 18 on the respective column 13, and the other element 19 on each side being secured respectively to an extension Ztl of the respective beam i4, the beams may be tilted upwardly, as pictured in the broken line portion of FIGURE l.

In this form of the device the container employed consists of a exible sack 21 having a closed bottom wall 22 and a rim 23 forming an open top. The rim 23 is secured by suitable conventional means to the fore and aft beams 114 and two transverse beams 11i', one of which is shown in FIGURE 2. The rim 23 is accordingly supported in operating condition by the beams when the beams and the container are in operative condition resting upon the chassis in the attitude illustrated in FIG- URES 1, 2 and 3 of the drawings.

To impart the desired mixing motion to the ilexible sack of the container, there is employed a wobble plate 25, here shown as a disk of appreciable thickness, and upon which rests the closed bottom 22 of the ilexible sack. In this form of invention it may be assumed that the bottom 22 is iirmly attached to the wobble plate. To induce a wobble motion in the wobble plate and consequently in the closed bottom 22, a plate support 26 is made use of attached to the wobble plate 25. The plate support has a central bushing 27 in which is rotatably positioned a shaft 28 having a head 29 thereon received in a recess 30 of the plate support. A lower end 31 of the shaft is secured in a head 32 of a vertical drive shaft member 33 on al1 axis which is tilted relative to the vertical and which also is offset relative to Vthe axis of the drive shaft member 33.

Where the imparting of rotary motion to the closed bottom 22 is to be avoided, it may be preferable to so locate and tilt the axis of the shaft 28 with respect to the axis of the drive shaft 33 in order that the axes intersect at the topmost portion of the shaft 28. Although satisfactory results have been experienced by tilting the axis of the shaft 23 as much as about 27 degrees from vertical where moderate speed of rotation is used, smaller angles of tilt may on occasions be preferable. A range of from about 5 degrees of tilt to about 30 degrees of tilt is possible, the lesser degree of tilt necessitating generally a more rapid rate of rotation. In consequence the plane of the wobble plate 25, or at least the upper surface thereof, will be tilted at an appropriate angle from horizontal of between about 5 degrees and 30 degrees.

To provide support for the drive shaft member 33 and to mount it in a position so that the drive shaft in turn can support the wobble plate and ultimately the bottom of the container, the shaft 33 has a suitable conventional vertical mounting 34 on a bottom member 35 of the truck chassis 11.

To motivate the drive shaft, there is provided a worm gear 36, for example, on the drive shaft in operated engagement with a worm wheel 37, which in turn is nonrotatably connected to a drive shaft 3S originating in a clutch 39. The clutch may be manipulated between on and oi positions by means of a clutch handle 40 whereby the drive shaft 38 secures its power from a suitable source (not shown) in the truck chassis to a shaft extension 41.

The container and more particularly the flexible sack or bowl 2 is for the purpose of receiving and mixing the ingredients such, for example, as gravel, sand, cement and water, in order to make a concrete mix` After the mix has been completed, as a matter of convenience, the mixture can be discharged from the flexible sack by ernployment of substantially conventional clam shell gates 45 and de. To make operation of the gates possible, the structural elements comprising the beams 14, 14 may be tilted upwardly from the solid line position of FIGURE l to the broken line position of FIGURE 1 pivoting about the pivot connections l5. Once in this position the gates 45 and 46 may be manipulated to open and closed position alternatively by employment of a power device 47 of some suitable sort. Inasmuch as the gates overhang the rear of the chassis when in the discharging position, a wheelbarrow, concrete cart, bucket, or other appropriate receptacle, can be located beneath the gates in order to receive material discharged thereby. On some occasions the gates may discharge directly into forms for the placing of the concrete.

In upward position under those circumstances where the wobble plate 25 is actually secured to and made part of the closed bottom 22, it becomes advisable to elevate the plate support 26, shaft 2S, and appropriate gearing comprising the worm gear 36 and worm wheel 37, as well as the mounting element within which the mounting 34 of the shaft is secured. Appropriate conventional connections may be provided inasmuch as the parts herein described are suggestive only of this particular portion of the drive train.

In the operation of this form of the device it is anticipated that the drive shaft member 33 will be rotated at such a degree that the wobble motion imparted to the wobble plate 25 will be suiiiciently rapid so that portions Sil, 50', Sil", etc., will first move upwardly whereby to toss parti-cles 51, 51', Si, etc., upwardly into the mass, after which the corresponding portions 50, 50', 50, etc., will move away from the particles thus tossed up into the mass at a speed which exceeds the acceleration of gravity in order that the particles thus tossed up into the mass will not fall back to the closed bottom of the iiexible sack but instead other particles will work their way beneath the particles thus tossed up. In practice an effective rate of rotation of the wobble plate has been found to be such that each element of its surface moves up and down at an accelerating rate of not less than about 32.16 feet per second per second.

On an eight-inch trial wobble plate Where speed and acceleration figures were made the subject of careful study, it was found that the mixer worked extremely effectively where the speed of rotation of the shaft member 33 was about 40() rpm., making a speed at the periphery of the wobble plate of about L6 times the acceleration due to gravity, namely, l.6 32.2 feet per second. This was accomplished by employment of a source of power of one-third horse power embodied in an electric motor. It was found furthermore, as a result of extensive recordings made during the trial period, that the speed of rotation was effective and remains substantially the same for virtually all types of mixing processes which include the mixing of very Wet concrete, the mixing of what is customarily identified as dry concrete mixes, the mixing of dry ingredients alone, the mixing of pasty masses, actually sundry types of dry rocket propellant, as well as various types of liquids.

Where materials such as concrete mix are adequately mixed in the mixer and thereafter dumped from the mixer, the iiexible sack can be quickly and effectively cleaned by merely dumping a quantity of water into the llexible sack and subjecting the sack to the same type of wobble motion made use of in initially mixing the ingredients,

after which the dirty water can be poured clear, leaving the sack satisfactorily clean.

Moreover, in the performance of ythe mixing operation which is resorted to for mixing up aggregate of different types with sand, dry cement and water, by way 'of example, it is noted further that not only does the tossing of the materials upwardly by the wobble motion of the wobble plate affect the adequacy of the mix, but movement of the flexible wall of the flexible sack, as indicated at the points 52 and 53 of FIGURES 4, 5 and 6, adds appreciably to the mixing effect. For example, when the point 50 is down, as indicated in FIGURES 4 and 5, the fold area 52 on the flexible sack is straightened out slightly and the force of this straightening tosses particles 54 upwardly and inwardly into the mass. At the same moment the portion 50", being in an upwardly moved position, forms a pocket-like fold 53 for the particles 51 v into which some of the particles fall. When this is followed subsequently during rotation of the wobble plate by the motion described for the portion 50 and fold 52, the tossing of the particles, which in this instance are identified by the particles 51", will throw those particles back in the mass, as previously described for the particles 54.

During this movement there will also be imparted to particles adjacent the surface of the closed bottom a peripheral movement indicated by the arrow S5. This is an additional motion given to particles which chance at the particular moment to be substantially in contact with the surface of the closed bottom. It will, however, be appreciated that motion of the particles taking .place as rapidly as described produces a constantly moving and rapidly moving motion in virtually every single particle of the mixture of materials within the sack which might, for purposes of explanation, be likened to the familiar Brownian movement of particles in the manner described in textbooks on physics. At the rate of rotation of 400 r.p.m. there will be a somewhat vibratory motion apparent in the flexible sack which is simply a result of the rapid wobble motion imparted to the wobble plate and the corresponding portion of the closed bottom coupled with the llexino of the walls of the sack adjacent the bottom, all of which takes place with considerable rapidity such that the entire mixture in the sack is completely and thoroughly admixed, one type of particle with another, during an interval of about 21/2 seconds. The time interval appears to be substantially the same irrespective of the character of the ingredients mixed and the size of the sack. The important factor appears to be the speed of rotation such that movement of points or portions on the wobble plate in a substantially vertical direction exceeds the acceleration due to gravity so that particles tossed up into the mass are tossed far enough to be engulfed in the mass and are prevented from falling back upon a corresponding portion of the bottom from which they have been tossed.

More, although the flexible sack in the chosen example has been indicated as being a completely flexible sack such as might be made of fabric reinforced rubber or similar flexible material, it wlil be understood that the entire sack need not be flexible since that portion of the closed bottom which is in contact with the wobble plate need not be flexible inasmuch as it remains unilexed during-operation. Further still, upper portions of the side wall of the sack are not subjected to flexing and consequently these portions of the sack likewise may be of stiff material of an inflexible character should such a structure from a purely structural standpoint be more feasible under certain circumstances.

Although a wobble plate strictly has been described in connection with the form of invention illustrated in FIG- URES l through 6, inclusive, a motion sufficient to generate an effective wave pattern in a sack or bowl 21 may be achieved by other means. For example, in FIGURE 7 there is shown a sack or bowl with a semiflexible plain surfaced bottom 22'. To impart a wave motion to this bot-tom, a drive shaft 61 has attached thereto a transverse shaft 62 at the outer end of which is a wide tread roller 63. The roller is preferably one which rotates relative to the transverse shaft 62 in order that as the drive shaft 61 rotates at a'speed of about 400 r.p.m. or such related speed as may be needed to produce the desired speed of rise and fall of the portions of the sack or bowl, the roller 63 will roll in a circular path on the underside of the bottom 22 and give to it a wave motion which may, for example, be the wobble motion described for the plate of FIGURES l through 6, inclusive. Where the bottom is flexible or semiflexible a deformation 64 may be formed which follows around with the wheel, and which may be relied upon to still further improve the effect.

In still another form of the device illustrated in FIG- URE 9 where a similar sack or bowl 21 having a bottom 22 is employed, a wave pattern is achieved in a slightly different manner. Although a drive shaft 66 is shown by of example other drive means may be employed. The drive shaft is provided with a cam plate 67 upon which is a cam 68 adjacent the perimeter. The cam 68 provides in effect what may be described as a cam drive against plungers 69, 7 tl, 71, etc., in a circumferentially progressive sequence whereby one after anotherof the plungers is elevated against the bottom 22", thereby to give the bottom substantially the same wave motion or more specifically in this example the same wobble motion as has been described for the wobble plate 25. The speed of rotation, of course, of the drive shaft 66 can be varied at will to suit different demands. It is, of course, desirable to have the speed one capable of producing the same resultant vertical movement of portions of the bottom which exceeds the rate of acceleration of gravity of the particles contained in the sack 21".

In another form of the device, as illustrated in FIG- URES 10 yand 11 la somewhat larger flexible sack 75 is made use of. The sack 75 is of the same fabric reinforced rubber-like material but elongated considerably so yas to be capable of resting simultaneously upon three aligned wobble plates 76, 77 and 78. At the left end of the sack, las illustrated in FIGURE 10, there is provided a charging hatch 79 which when iopened so that a 4lid 80 `is elevated to the broken line position there shown, ma-

lterial :can be charged into the sack. Appropriate means may be employed to distend the sack Vif the sack is to be loaded while n the position of FIGURE 10i,l although it may be preferable by employment of a suspension fixture or bracket `8l having a hole 82 therein so that by hooking fa lifting hook y83 at the end of 'a lift llineSlt into the hole 82, the sack may be suspended and in suspended position may be loaded through the hatch '79. Loading can in fact be done at the discharge end. Y

A-t the opposite end of the sack there is provided a frame A86 within which is mounted -a pair of clamshell gates `87 and 88 of substantially conventional kind manipulated, if preferred, by employment of a hydraulic ram indicated by thebroken lines 89 in FIGURE l0. When the sack is in position upon a trailer indicated generally by the reference character 90, a suitable bracket 91 on a chassis 92 may be employed in which to rest a ring 93 of the frame 86.

The chassis 92, extending rearwardly so as to be supported by wheels 94 and having la part 95 extending forward-ly so as to be supported by wheels 96 provides a mobile elongated support for the sack 75. It may be assumedA in this -fo-rm of the device that the wobble plates 76, 77 and 78 are not attached 4to the flexible wall of the sack but that the sack merely rests upon the plates during transit and during the mixing cycle.

'Ilhe construction and operation of the wobble plates 76, 77 and 78 of this form of the invention is substantially the same las that already [described in connection with FIGURES l, 2 and 3. For example, drive shafts 97, 98 tand 99 'are rotatably mounted in suitable bushings 100,

areas/la 7 101 and 102 supported in an elongated portion 1113 of the chassis 92. A common drive shaft 104 may he employed suitably ygeared by appropriate gearing of the type illustrated in FIGURES l, 2 and 3 lto the drivev shafts 7, 98 tand 99, respectively. For driving the drive shaft 1104, a shaft 105 may he employed to take power from .a suitable source (not shown) whereby :to transmit the rotating power through an intermediate shaft 14115 through suitable connections 107 and 108 to the chassis 10d. The only important requisite lies in the fact that there must he suflicient power supplied to accommodate the load of material superimposed upon the wobble plates Aand to give the necessary wobble motion to the plates at the speedneeded to effect `a thorough, rapid mixing.

After a few brief moments of mixing by `operation `of all three of the wobble plates simultaneously, the entire contents of the sack 7S will be effectively and thoroughly mixed. This, of course, preferably takes place at the point lof discharge or adjacent thereto immediately prior to the need for the completed mix. Thereupon, by use of the hook S3, the sack may be elevated by appropriate conventional means and carried to a desired point of discharge. At such a location the gates '89 and S3 may be manipulated in a well-known manner, thereby to either gradually or rapidly discharge the contents of the sack 75.

Following discharge, the sack may `be partially iilled with water and readjusted upon the chassis, Vat which location the water can -be agitated for :a few seconds -hy rotation of the wobble plates :and thereafter the wash water dumped, after which the sack is ready Ifor a succeeding mixing operation.

ln addition to a hatch type mixing operation, as has heen described in connection with FIGURES '1 through ll, inclusive. the device also lends itself to use as a continuous and extremely rapid mixer. To `accomplish this there may he provided la stationary hed, indicated generally by the reference character 115, constructed of columns 116, `117 `and 118 high enough to lsupport la platform 119 at a level high enough so that a cart `120 may be rolled beneath a discharge chute 121. The discharge chute forms the discharge end of la sack or container 122 of the elongated variety similar to that described in connection with FIGURES 10 and l1. In this instance also .there is provided a loading hatch 123 at the opposite end into which the ingredients may he loaded into the sack formixing.

To accomplish the mixing there are provided the same type wobble plates 124, 125 :and 126i, as has heen previously described, upon which the container 122 is mounted. For a continuous operation device like that illustrated in FIGURE l2, the wobble plates may he permanently :attached to the sack. As usual the wobble plates are tilted lwith respect .to ia horizontal plane at ian angle of about 27 degrees land rotated by ope-ration of drive shafts 127, 128 and 1,29. These may all he rotated simultaneously hy a single common shaft :1307 appropriately mounted in the platform for rotation from a source of power (not shown).

For continuous opera-tion material may be loaded at an extremely rapid rate into the hatch 123 las, for example, by passing it therein-to through a chute l131 so that material can be lied with extreme rapidity into the container 122. Because the mix operates so fast, there may be times during the cycle when agitation will not be necessary as, `for example, when the discharge chute i121 is closed. When carts are to be used to carry away the completed mix, the periods of inactivity of the wobble plates may be relatively frequent. A handle [132 may serve to open and close the discharge chute from time to time in order to lill containersV such as the carts 120. On other occasions, however, where it may he advisable to carry away the mix more rapidly, a pipe or conduit or' appropriate trough such as those commonly used on large concrete pouring projects (not shown) may be placed with one end beneath the discharge chute and mixed concrete led continuously away from the chute to the forms as fast yas it is mixed. It will he understood that because of the extreme rapidity of action of this type of device, the last described method of placement will more frequently be preferred and by its use vast masses .and tareas of concrete Ican he placed with extreme rapidity. rIlis not only provides ya rapid pour but also is especially advantageous for the pouring of monolithic slabs and monolithic structures fwhere it lis highly detrimental to have portions of the mass :begin to set up before :the entire mass is completely poured, thereby causing unnecessary strains yand joints in what would otherwise be a monolithic mass.

As evidences of the thoroughness of the lachieved by :the wobble motion hereinabove described, cross-sections ot a terrazzo in which individual aggregates of distinguishing color have been interjected show an almost perfectly uniform disposition of all of the particles. As further evidence of the thoroughness of the mix even though only seconds pass between initiation of operation and its complet-ion, aggregate upon examination subsequent to discharge and setting shows complete envelopment of all particles lby the cement grout. Further still, tension tests on samples of concrete mixed by the process herein described show tensile strength equal to and greater than that possible by employement of conventional mixing technique heretofore available. Further still, the result-ant etfect of a system which permits standby loads to remain indefinitely adjacent a job ,and then :be mixed in a matter of seconds establishes =a condition which is very notoriously economical of use of both equipment, power and labor while at the same time ibeing one productive of `an especially eiiective concre-te mix of virtually any desired consistency.

Although there is a plurality of wobble plates shown in FGURES l0 and l2 each capable of producing a wave form pattern of motion in material in the containers, it will be understood that this is largely a convenience since one plate only for supporting the container is likewise capable of giving to the container and its contents a satisfactory wave form pattern.

in the forms of invention hereinbefore described, the mechanism has been adapted to the device in such form as to produce a Wave pattern in the flexible container which is one following progressively in a circumferential direc- Jfion. `It will be understood, however, that other wave patterns may also be effective acting in directions other than circumferential. rEhe important elements of the invention comprehend a bowl or sack which has some portion of flexible character. This may be either the side wall or the bottom wall, or perhaps hoth as evidenced by FXGURES l0 and l2. The bowl or sack or other container does not need to be annular in its basic form. It does, however, need to have a substantial ilexible portion and does need to have some motion imparting mechanism operatively associated with the flexible portion so that a wave pattern can be transmitted through the flexible container to the contents. Further still, although a desired eective speed of the wave pattern such as that described in connection with the form of device illustrated in FIG- URES 4, 5, and 6 is often a high speed, special circumstances -may require the device to be operated at lower speeds. For example, in the -form of devices of FIG- URES 10 and l2 where the sacl; merely rests upon the motion imparting plates detined as wobble plates, the rotation in these instances should be slightly less than that capable of producing motion in the particles at speeds greater than the acceleration rate of gravity. ln continuous type mixers the rates can be appreciably less because of the continuous mixing from one end of the container to the other. The slower rate is also to be preferred because of the need for keeping the sack in downward engagement with the plates. Although the plurality of plates has been shown, the continuous character of mixing can also be achieved with no more than one plate located beneath the ilexible sack.

chamber 163 of the bowl.

In the form of device illustrated in FIGURE 13 there is shown a sack 140 of an elongated type having a charging hatch '1411 at one end and a discharge gate 142 at the other end, the sack being tilted from the charging end downwardly toward the gate.

To induce a wave pattern in the sack 140 and the ingredients therein which are to be mixed, there is shown in this instance a pair of motion inducing rockers 143 and 144 by way of example. In this example the bottom portion 145 of the sack 14d is also iiexible. Rocker 143 is pivotally mounted upon a pivot pin 146 supported upon a lbracket 147, the pin being attached to a lower end 14S of the rocker. At an upper end 149, the rocker is attached to a motion imparting member which may be a drive cylinder G designed to be either pneumatically or hydraulically actuated. The `drive cylinder is in turn connected through a shaft 151 to the upper end 149 of the rocker. The rocker lays on one side of the bottom as illustrated in FIGURE 13a.

The rocker 144 similarly is provided with a pin 152 by means of which the rocker is pivotally mounted upon the bracket 147 at a location parallel to and spaced from the rocker V143. In this instance also there is provided a drive cylinder y153` attached to the rocker 144 by means of a sha-ft 154.

Accordingly in this form of -device the drive cylinders 150 and 153 respectively, are operated in alternating sequence at a relatively rapid rate, the upper ends being moved throughout the greatest arc but with the same frequency as the remaining portions of the rocker. -By alternating operation of the rockers, a wave pattern is transmitted to the bottom 145 of the sack 140 which shifts from side to side transversely of the sack as the ingredients progress from the upper end of the sack to the gate 142. Because of the steady movement of the contents from the upper end of the sack to the lower end, the speed of the wave pattern which is imparted to the contents of the sack can and should be something less than that capable of producing movement of each element as'its surface moves up and down at a rate which does not exceed the accelerating rate of 32.16 feet per second. Nevertheless, the wave pattern so induced is progressive at least from side to side of the sack, and when the pattern is at the right rate of speed a very rapid mixing will take place. Caution, however, should be observed in this and other forms of the device where a wave pattern is induced to make certain that the particular speed elected is not one which is productive of a resonant effect. In the form of device illustrated in FIGURE 14, there is shown a bowl 158 which has a ilexible annular side wall 159 and a substantially flexible bottom 150. In this form of device there is preferably provided a plate 161 Vforming part of the bottom at the central point of which is mounted a column 162 which extends upwardly into v the interior The column may be of different sizes and heighths and one effective is a column consisting of a synthetic plastic material or other comparable material which is rigid and which can be securely anchored to the plate 161.

ln this -form there may also be provided bosses 164 and 165 which are shallow projections extending inwardly from the interior wall of the side 159 of the bowl.

When a progressive wave pattern is imparted to this form of device and particularly a wave or wobble pattern which progresses circumferentially the top of the column 162 will also shift about rapidly at the mid-portion of the mass thereby to break up movement at the mid-portion to prevent the production of a relatively dead area at the center. Movement of the top of the column 162 will provide a very substantial stirring action as will also movement of lower portions of the column. The bosses 164 and 165 will also contribute to a churning of the ingredients where such an additional churning eifect is advantageous. lthough the introduction of the column and the bosses into the interior or" theV receptacle in this instance does place therein objects which may be the subject of some wear, special circumstances may suggest that the increased advantage in the churning is more to be desired than minimization of portions which may wear. The character of the ingredients being mixed and the speed of mixing will in many instances entirely offset the possible disadvantage of contamination.

`In the form of device illustrated in FIGURE 15 there is shown a bowl 1711 having a flexible side wall 171 and a bottom 172. A wobble plate 173 is located at the center of the bottom -1'72 on the outside surface and on the inside surface is a conical projection 174. The conical shape embodied in the projection being one of a very broad base and very narrow apex avoids a decided churning ei'fect but nevertheless by virtue of the presence of the conical projection, the ingredients within the bowl are compelled to concentrate in the space between the wall 17.1 and the conical projection. Hence, the physical presence of this projection inhibits the accumulation of any ingredients at a central location where motion might be at a minimum thereby to avoid the prospect of segregation of the component parts to be mixed.

While the invention has herein been shown and described in what is conceived to be the most practical and preferred embodiment, it is recognized that departures may be made therefrom within the scope of the invention, which is not to be limited to the details disclosed herein but is to be accorded the full scope of the claims so as to embrace any and all equivalent devices.

Having described the invention,vwhat is claimed as new in support of Letters Patent is: Y

1. A mixer for materials comprising a trame, a drive means rmounted on said frame, a container for said materials having a exible portion, a distorting mechanism for said container having an element thereof in engagement with the ilexible portion and movable in a wave forming pattern, and an operating connection from said drive means to said distorting mechanism, said container being of yieldable material and having an endless progressive cycle of deformation in response to wave motion induced therein by said distorting mechanism.

2.V A mixer for materials comprising a frame, a drive shaft member rotatably mounted on said frame, a wobble assembly comprising a container for said materials having a flexible wall, said container having a wobble element vin engagement with the bottom and tilted with respect to horizontal at a fixed angle and a wobble drive connection between said wobble element and said drive shaft, said wobble assembly being mounted above said drive shaft and in operative engagement with said container, said container being of yieldable material and having a perimetrically progressive cycle of `deformation in response to wobble motion induced in said wobble element by said drive shaft member.

3. A mixer for materials comprising a frame, a drive shaft member rotatably mounted on said frame, a wobble assembly comprising a container for said material having a flexible wall, said container having a wobble element in engagement with the bottom at a fixed degree of tilt with respect to horizontal and a |wobble drive connection between said wobble telement and said drive shaft, said wobble element being mounted above the upper end of said drive shaft in supported position thereon and having a peripherally progressive vertically reciprocating movement, and a drive connection between -said wobble element and said container, said flexible side wall being yieldable alternately outwardly and inwardly and having 'a periphenally progressive cycle of deformation in response to wobble motion induced in said wobble element by said drive shaft member.

4. A mixer for materials comprising a fname, a dnive 'shaft member rotatably mounted on saidframe in substantially a vertical position, -a wobble assembly comprising a wobble plate having a mixer supporting area tilted with respect to horizontal and a wobble drive connection between said wobble plate and said drive shaft, said wobble assembly being mounted on the upper end of said drive shaft in supported position thereon and having a peripherally progressive vertically reciprocally movement, and a container rior said materials having a bottom fwall in supported relationship on said mixer supporting area, said container having a ilexible side wall yieldable alternately outwardly and inwardly and having a peripherally progressive cycle of deformation in response to wobble motion induced in said wobble plate through said wobble drive connection by said drive shaft member.

5. A mobile batch mixer for materials comprising a base frame, a mobile support for said base frame a-nd a source of power carried by said base frame, a drive member mounted on said base frame in a substantially vertical position and operatively connected to said source of power, an` auxiliary frame, a container for said materials having an open topsecured to said auxiliary frame, a bottom, and a liexible side wall interconnecting said bottom with said top, means tiltably mounting said auxiliary frame and said container on said 1oase frame and enabling said container to be tilted from a mixing position to a dumping position, a distorting mechanism in engagement with said bottom and in supporting relationship therewith, and -driving means operatively connected between said distorting mechanism and said drive member for imparting a progressive wave producing motion to said distorting mechanism and said container.

6. A mobile batch mixer for materials comprising a base frame, a mobile support for said base frame and a source of power carried by said base frame, a drive shaft member rotatably mounted on said base frame in a substantially vertical position and operatively connected to said source of power, an auxiliary frame, a container for said materials having an open top secured to said auxiliary frame, a bottom, and a flexible side wall interconnecting said bottom with said top, means tiltably mounting said auxiliary frame and said container on said base frame, said auxiliary trame and said container being tiltable from a mixing position to a dumping position, a wobble plate in engagement with said bottom and in supporting relationship therewith and having a perimeter located inwardly relative to said'wall, said wobble plate having a circumferentially progressive vertically reciproeating motion, and rotatably acting driving means operatively connected between said wobble plate and said drive shaft member for imparting said motion to said wobble plate and said container.

7. A mobile batch mixer for materials comprising a 'base frame, a mobile support for said base frame and a source of power, a drive shaft member rotatably mounted on said base frame in a substantially vertical position and operatively connected to said source of power, an auxiliary frame, a container for said materials having an open top secured to said auxiliary frame, a bottom, and a flexible side wall interconnecting said bottom lwith said top, means tiltably -mounting said auxiliary frame on said base frame, said auxiliary frame and said container being tiltable about said mounting from a mixing position to a dumping position, a wobble plate in engagement with said bottom and in supporting relationship therewith and having a perimeter located inwardly relative to said wall, said wobble plate having a circumferentially progressive vertically reciprocating motion, and driving means operatively connected between said wobble plate and said drive shaft member for imparting said motion to said wobble plate and said container, said driving means comprising a wobble shaft rotatably mounting said wobble plate on said drive shaft in a position at substantially a tilt of from about 5 degrees to 30y degrees from horizontal and operable in a circumferentially pro- "gressive direction whereby to impart said motion to said l2 wobble plate and said container in response to actuation by said source of power` 8. A mixer for materials comprising a base frame, a support for said base frame and a source of power carried by said base frame, a drive member mounted on said base frame and operatively connected to said source of power, an auxiliary frame, a container for said materials having a top secured to said auxiliary frame, a bottom, and a flexible side vwall interconnecting said bottom with said top, -a distorting member in engagement with said bottom and in supporting relationship therewith, said distorting member being movable in a wave form pattern and driving means yoperatively connected between said distorting member and said drive member for imparting a progressive wave forro pattern of motion to said container', said driving means comprising contacting means engageable with the bottom of the container at progressively diterent locations whereby to impart a circumferentially progressive wave form pattern of motion to said distorting member and said container in response to actuation by said source of power.

9. A mixer for materials comprising a base iframe, a support for said base frame and a source of power carried by said base frame, a drive shaft member rotatably mounted on said base frame in a substantially vertical position and operatively connected to said source of power, an auxiliary frame, acontainer for said materials having a top secured to said auxiliary frame, a bottom, and a flexible side wall interconnecting said bottom with said top, a wobble plate in engagement with said bottom and in supporting relationship therewith, and driving means operatively connected between said wobble plate and said drive shaft member for imparting a circumferentially progressive wobble motion to said wobble plate and said container, those portions of said container lying in .a position opposed to motion of said wobble plate having a yieldable character and being displaceable when subjected to said motion, said driving means comprising a wobble 'shaft rotatably mounting said wobble plate on said drive shaft in a position at a tilt of from about 5 degrees to 30 degrees from horizontal and operable in ,a ciroumferentially progressive direction whereby to irnpart a circumferentially progressive wobble motion to said wobble plate and said container in response to actuation by said source of power.

10. A mixer for materials comprising a base frame, a support for said base frame and a source of power carried by said base frame, a drive shaft member rotatably mounted on said base frame in a substantially vertical position and operatively connected to said source of power, an auxiliary frame, a container for said materials having a top secured to said auxiliary frame, a bottom and a flexible side wall interconnecting said bottom with said top, a wobble area on the exterior of said bottom, and driving means operatively connected between said wobble area and said drive shaft member for imparting a circumferentially progressive wobble motion to said wobble area and said container, said driving means comprising a transverse shaft having the inner end nonrotatably secured to said drive shaft and extending beneath said wobble area and a roller on the outer end of the transverse shaft in rolling engagement with the underside of said wobble area and operable i-n a circumferentially progressive direction whereby to impart a circumferentially progressive wobble motion to said wobble area and the container.

l1. A mixer for materials comprising a base frame, a support for said base frame and a source of power carried by said base frame, a drive shaft member rotatably mounted on said base frame in a substantially vertical position and operatively connected to said source of power, an `auxiliary frame, a container for said materials having a top secured to said auxiliary frame, a bottom, and a flexible side wall interconnecting said bottom with said top, a wobble area on said bottom and in supporting relationship therewith, and rdriving means operatively connected between said wobble area and said drive shaft member for imparting a circumferentially progressive wobble motion to said wobble tarea and said container, said driving means comprising an intermediate plate between said wobble area and said drive shaft, a series of vertically acting cams spaced circumferentially about the perimeter of said intermediate plate and in engagement with said wobble area, and a cam drive yon said drive shaft member operable on said series of cams in a circumferentially progressive direction whereby to impart a circumferentially progressive wobble motion to said wobble area and said container in response to actuation by said source of power.

l2. A portable mixer for materials comprising a mobile chassis having a bed, at least one drive shaft rotatably mounted on the bed, a wobble plate for said Idrive shaft having an taxis of rotation tilted at an oblique angle with relation to the horizontal, and a wobble drive from said drive shaft to the wobble plate, a container having a wall -of flexible material, said container having a discharge gate for mixed material, a material feeding hatch for unmixed materials and a suspension fixture, said conrainer having a position for mixing extending over said wobble plate and supported thereby, those portions of said container llying in a position opposed to motion of said wobble plate having a yieldable character and being displaceable when subjected to said motion, said material being adapted to be rapidly mixed by operation of said wobble plate, said container when loaded with mixed material being adapted to be lifted from said wobble plate and moved to a ijnal location for placement.

13. A portable mixer for materials comprising a mobile chassis having an elongated bed, a plurality of drive shafts rotatably mounted on the bed in substantially vertical positions and a source of power in communication with said drive shafts, a wobble plate for each ydrive shaft having an axis of rotation tilted at an oblique angle with relation to the respective drive shaft, said drive shafts being rotatable relative to the Arespective wobble plate, and a wobble drive from said drive shaft to the wobble plate, a single container having a wall of -exible material, said container having at :one end a discharge gate for mixed material and at the other end a material feeding hatch for unmixed materials, and a suspension xture at said other end, said container having a position for mixing extending over said plurality of wobble plates and supported thereby with said hatch facing upwardly at one end and said discharge gate resting on said bed in closed position at the other end, those portions of said container lying in a position opposed to motion of said wobble plate having a displaceable character and location fand. being displaceable when subjected to said motion, said material being adapted to be rapidly mixed by operation of said wobble plates, said container when loaded with mixed material being adapted to be lifted from said wobble plates by use of said suspension ixture to a iinal location for placement.

14. A continuous mixer Ifor materials comprising a stationary bed, a plurality of drive shafts rotatably mounted on said bed, a wobble plate for each drive shaft having an axis of rotation tilted at an oblique angle with relation to the horizontal, and a wobble drive from said drive shafts to the respective wobble plates, a container having a wall of flexible material, said container having a discharge opening including a closure therefor and having a charging hatch, the flexible Wall at locations thereof adjacent the wobble plates being supported thereby, those portions of said container lying in a position opposed to motion of said wobble plate having a displaceable charfacter and location and being displaceable when subjected to said motion, said wall when moved in response to movement of said wobble plate being adapted to continuously mix said materials into a homogeneous mass while passing through the container from the charging hatch to the discharge opening.

15. A continuous mixer for materials comprising a stationary bed, drive shafts rotatably mounted in alignment on said bed in substantially vertical positions spaced one kfrom another, a wobble plate for each drive shaft having an taxis of rotation tilted at an oblique angle with relation to the respective drive shaft, said drive shaft being rotatable with relation to the respective wobble plate, and a wobble drive from said drive shafts to the respective wobble plates, la `single container having a wall of exible material, said container having at one end a discharge opening including a closure therefor and at the other end a charging hatch, the iexible wall at locations thereof adjacent the wobble plates being secured to lche wobble plates and supported thereby, those portions of said container lying in a position opposed to motion of said wobble plate having a displaceable character and location and being displaceable when subjected to said motion, said 'wobble plates being operatable at la speed productive of resultant vertical movement of portions of said plate about the area thereof whereby to continuously mix said materials into a homogeneous mass while said materials are passing through the container'from the charging hatch to the discharge opening.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,336,438 Evans Dec. 7, 1943* 2,497,532. Berkman Feb. 14, 1950 2,499,162 Rand Feb. 28, 1950 2,648,344 Randolph Aug. ll, 1953 2,809,020 Magee etal Oct. 8, 1957 '2,915,983 Berrian Dec. 8, 1959 2,95 8,294 Johnson Nov. 1, 1960i 3,030,081- Wilson Apr. 17, 1962 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,049,343 Germany June \15, 1955

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Classifications
U.S. Classification366/45, 68/96, 366/26, 298/11, 366/239
International ClassificationB28C5/42, B01F11/00
Cooperative ClassificationB28C5/023, B01F11/0045, B01F11/0065, B28C5/42
European ClassificationB28C5/02A, B01F11/00D2, B01F11/00J, B28C5/42